Dialysis is Now Old Enough to Have Its Own Museum

You know kidney disease advocates sort of bond together, right? I somehow magically ran across Steve Weed, a two time transplant recipient who has his own web development company that specializes in social media planning: Landau Digital Solutions. Actually, he unwittingly led me to the publisher of my first book: What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease before I even knew what he did for a living. But I digress.

While recovering from his recent transplant, Steve posted about visiting a dialysis museum. I found myself mystified that such a thing existed. Wasn’t dialysis only about fifty years old? Who had a museum about such a young invention?

Then I realized that I had never written about the history of dialysis. Maybe it was older. So I did a little digging for us. Will you look at that! The idea of dialysis is much older than I’d thought. This is from Renal Med at http://www.renalmed.co.uk/history-of/haemodialysis:

“Scottish chemist Thomas Graham, known as the ‘father of dialysis’, first described dialysis in 1854. He used osmosis to separate dissolved substances and remove water through semi-permeable membranes, although he did not apply the method to medicine

He worked as a chemist in Glasgow University at around the same time as physician Richard Bright was describing the clinical features and diagnosis of renal failure in Edinburgh. He noticed that crystalloids were able to diffuse through vegetable parchment coated with albumin (which acted as a semi-permeable membrane). He called this ‘dialysis’. Using this method he was able to extract urea from urine. Graham prepared a bell-shaped vessel….”­

This was the seed that later became hemodialysis, which is defined by MedlinePlus (part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine) at https://medlineplus.gov/dialysis.html in the following way:

“Hemodialysis uses a machine. It is sometimes called an artificial kidney. You usually go to a special clinic for treatments several times a week.”

The difference in spelling is due to the variations between British English and American English.

Another step in dialysis becoming dialysis as we know it today is:

“The first human hemodialysis was performed in a uremic patient by (Me: His given name is Georg.) Haas in 1924 at the University of Giessen in Germany…. He used a tubular device made of collodion immersed in dialysate solution in a glass cylinder. Haas was able to calculate that the total non-protein nitrogen removed was 2,772 g. He also showed that the presence of some uremic substances in the dialysate and that water could be removed from the blood. In 1928, he first used the anticoagulant, heparin. In 1937, the first flat hemodialysis membrane made of cellophane was produced, which is produced in similar manner to cellulose, but dissolved in alkali and carbon disulfide…. The resulting solution is then extruded through a slit and washed multiple times to obtain a transparent semipermeable material.”

I found the information on the Advanced Renal Education Program site at https://www.advancedrenaleducation.com/content/history-hemodialysis.

Then, finally, dialysis as we know it. DPC Education Center (Dialysis Patient Citizens) at http://www.dpcedcenter.org/brief-history-dialysis provided this information.

“The history of dialysis dates back to the 1940s. (Me here again: although we know the seeds for the dialysis were planted much earlier.) The first type of dialyzer, then called the artificial kidney, was built in 1943 by Dutch physician Willem Kolff. Kolff had first gotten the idea of developing a machine to clean the blood after watching a patient suffer from kidney failure. When his invention was completed, he attempted to treat over a dozen patients with acute kidney failure over the next two years. Although only one treatment turned out successful, he continued to experiment in improving his design.”

The sources use many words you may not be familiar with. IvyRoses at http://www.ivyroses.com/HumanBody/Urinary/Urinary_System_Kidney_Dialysis.php was able to help us out here.

Parts of a Kidney Dialysis Machine

Dialysis Membrane (sometimes referred to as simply a ‘dialyser’)
Note that there are two types of artificial kidney dialysis in clinical use: Hemodialysis uses a cellulose-membrane tube immersed in fluid, whereas peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of the patient’s abdominal cavity (peritoneum), as a dialysis membrane. This section … only describes the case of hemodialysis.
The “dialyser” part of a kidney dialysis machine consists of a large surface area of cellulose acetate membrane mechanically supported by a plastic structure. Blood is pumped past one side of this membrane while the dialysate fluid passes on the other side. The membrane may be folded-over many times so that the large area of the membrane occupies a practical volume of space.

Dialysate
The dialysate (solution) has the same solute concentrations as those in ordinary plasma. Therefore if the patient’s blood plasma contains excess concentrations of any solutes, these will move into the dialysate, and if the blood plasma lacks the ideal concentration of any solutes, these will move into the patient’s blood. Conversely, the dialysate fluid does not contain any waste products such as urea – so these substances in the patient’s blood move down the concentration gradient into the dialysate.

Anticoagulant
Heparin is the usual anticoagulant that is added to the patient’s blood as it enters the dialysis machine (in order to prevent the blood from clotting as it passes through the machine). Preventing the blood from clotting should, in turn, prevent any blood clots from blocking the filtration surface of the system. However, heparin is not added during the final hour of dialysis in order to enable the patient’s blood clotting activity to return to normal before he or she leaves.”

Finally, I went to the museum site itself for more information. You can find their site at https://www.nwkidney.org/about-us/dialysis-museum/. This important piece of information showed up there.

“It was 1960 when Dr. Belding Scribner and his colleagues at University of Washington developed the Scribner shunt, a device made of Teflon that could link an artery and a vein. This relatively simple device was revolutionary – it made long-term dialysis possible for the first time. Chronic kidney failure was no longer a death sentence.”

So now I know… and so do you. If I ever get out to Seattle again, this museum is on my list of places to visit.

Before I go, The American Kidney Fund asked me to let you know about two webinars this month, both on topics close to my heart… I mean my kidneys. They are Slowing down kidney disease on September 20th and Tips for talking with your doctor on Sept. 25th. Why not mark these on your calendar now while you’re thinking of it?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Just a Little Bit Pregnant

We are in Dayton, Ohio, right now and have attended the surprise baby shower for one of my daughters. Wow, just wow! Every other phrase from the guests’ lips was baby this or baby that… and rightly so. It was a baby shower, for goodness’ sake. I loved the oohing and aahing, the happy tears, the stories about when the mom and dad to be were babies themselves. I loved seeing how excited the parents to be were and how thrilled we all were for them.

Yep, I got to thinking. Is it the same for those pregnant moms with CKD? When I first started writing about Chronic Kidney Disease back in 2010, this was included in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“Pregnancy is risky for women with CKD. The risks for both the mother and fetus are high as is the risk of complications.  You’ll need to carefully discuss this with your nephrologist and your gynecologist should you absolutely, positively want to bear a child rather than adopt.”

How dismal. And how outdated. Eight years can make one heck of a lot of difference in the medical field.

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/pregnancy has information which is far more recent so I’m going to turn this week’s blog over to them for a while:

“A new baby is a joy for any family. But pregnancy can put a lot of stress on your body. If you have kidney disease or kidney failure, it can put you and the health of your unborn child at risk.

Are you thinking about pregnancy? If so, you should discuss it beforehand with your doctor or other healthcare provider. They know you, and they can help you make a decision that is based on your own personal health. There are many things to consider. You and your doctor should discuss them all very carefully. Some things that can affect a healthy pregnancy include:

  • Your stage of kidney disease
  • Your general health
  • Your age
  • Having high blood pressure, diabetes, or heart disease
  • Having other serious health conditions
  • Protein in your urine

Here are a few brief answers to some common questions about kidney disease and pregnancy.

Can a woman with “mild” kidney disease have a baby?

That depends. There is good evidence to suggest that women with very mild kidney disease (stages 1-2), normal blood pressure, and little or no protein in the urine (called “proteinuria”) can have a healthy pregnancy. What is proteinuria? It’s a sign of kidney damage. Your body needs protein. But it should be in your blood, not your urine. Having protein in your urine usually means that your kidneys cannot filter your blood well and the protein is leaking out.

In women with moderate to severe kidney disease (stages 3-5), the risk of complications is much greater. For some women, the risk to mother and child is high enough that they should consider avoiding pregnancy.

If you are thinking of becoming pregnant, ask your doctor or other healthcare provider about your stage of kidney disease, your risk for complications, your degree of proteinuria, and any other health conditions you may have.

Can a woman who is on dialysis have a baby?

Some changes in your body make it hard to become pregnant. For example, most women on dialysis have anemia (a low red blood cell count) and hormone changes. This may keep them from having regular menstrual periods.

Women with kidney failure are usually advised against becoming pregnant. The rate of complications is very high. Risks to both the mother and developing baby are high. If you are thinking of becoming pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider. If you become pregnant, you will need close medical supervision, changes in medicine, and more dialysis to have a healthy baby.

Can a woman who has a kidney transplant have a baby?

Yes. If you have a kidney transplant, you are likely to have regular menstrual periods and good general health. Therefore, getting pregnant and having a child is possible. But you should not become pregnant for at least one year after your transplant, even with stable kidney function. Some medicines that you take after a kidney transplant can cause problems to a developing baby. In some cases, pregnancy may not be recommended because there is a high risk to you or the baby. Another reason is if there is a risk of losing the transplant.

Talk with your healthcare provider if you have a transplant and are thinking about getting pregnant. Your healthcare provider may need to change your medications so that it is safe for you to become pregnant. It is very important to use birth control until you and your healthcare provider have agreed that it is safe for you to become pregnant.”

There is even more information at the URL for this article. What I found encouraging is that for each stage of kidney disease – chronic, dialysis, transplant – there is hope. I see the cautions, I know it means extra care and extra work, but it is possible. Nowhere did I read that pregnancy is not for those with CKD.

By the way, I didn’t develop CKD until my youngest was in her twenties and my doctor still had to take my general health, age, and if I had high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, or other serious health conditions into account.

The baby whose shower we attended is our first grandchild. When I was diagnosed with CKD a decade ago, I doubted I would live to see this day… and that had nothing to do with the fact that I had just met the man who was to be my husband and hadn’t yet met his daughter who will be this baby’s mother.

My point here is that I’ve learned so much about keeping my CKD under control and it’s pretty much been through asking questions and working with my nephrologist, as well as researching. And now I’m urging you to learn as much as you can if you’d like to have a baby. Well, in general too, but today’s blog is about pregnancy.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Ratio: Is That Like Rationing?

urine containerA friend called me Friday night wondering what her creatinine/albumin ratio meant since that reading was high on her last blood draw. Actually, she wanted to know if this was something to worry about. After extracting a promise that she would call her doctor with her questions today when her physician’s office opened for business again, I gave her some explanations. Of course, then I wanted to give you the same explanations.

Although the Online Etymology Dictionary tells us both ratio and rationing are derived from the same Latin root – ratio – which means “reckoning, calculation; business affair, procedure,” also “reason, reasoning, judgment, understanding,” they aren’t exactly the same. My old favorite, The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines ratio at dictionaryhttps://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ratio in the following way: the relationship in quantity, amount, or size between two or more things, as in that of your creatinine and albumin.

As for rationing, if you’re old enough to remember World War II, you know what it means. If you’re not, the same dictionary can help us out again. At https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rationing, we’re told it’s “a share especially as determined by supply.” Nope, doesn’t work here since we’re not sharing our creatinine or albumin with anyone else. We each have our own supply in our own ratios, albeit sometimes too high or sometimes too low.

What are creatinine and albumin anyway? Let’s see what we can find about creatinine in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

“Additional important jobs of the kidneys are removing liquid waste from your body and balancing the minerals in the body. The two liquid waste products are urea which has been broken down from protein by the digestive system and creatinine which is a byproduct of muscle activity.”

Well, what about albumin? This can get a bit complicated. Remember, the UACR (Hang on, explanation of this coming soon.) deals with urine albumin. There’s an explanation in SlowItDownCKD  2016 about what it’s not: serum albumin.

“Maybe we should take a look at serum albumin level. Serum means it’s the clear part of your blood, the part without red or white blood cells. This much is fairly common knowledge. Albumin is not. Medlineplus, part of The National Institutes of Health’s U.S. National Library of Medicine at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003480.htm tells us, ‘Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.’ Uh-oh, this is also not good: a high level of serum albumin indicates progression of your kidney disease. Conversely, kidney disease can cause a high level of serum albumin.”

17362522_10212181967927975_1328874508266442848_n (1)

This is from SlowItDownCKD 2015 and explains what the UACR is and why your albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UAC R) is important:

In recent years, researchers have found that a single urine sample can provide the needed information. In the newer technique, the amount of albumin in the urine sample is compared with the amount of creatinine, a waste product of normal muscle breakdown. The measurement is called a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). A urine sample containing more than 30 milligrams of albumin for each gram of creatinine (30 mg/g) is a warning that there may be a problem. If the laboratory test exceeds 30 mg/g, another UACR test should be done 1 to 2 weeks later. If the second test also shows high levels of protein, the person has persistent proteinuria, a sign of declining kidney function, and should have additional tests to evaluate kidney function.

Thank you to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse , a service of the NIH, at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/proteinuria/#tests for that information.”

Basically, that means if you have a high UACR once, get your urine retested a week or two later before you even think about worrying, which is what my friend’s doctor confirmed. But do make sure to get that second test so you can be certain your kidney function is not being compromised.

I was thrilled that both my paper and notes from the field about Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness were accepted for Landmark’s Journal for the  Conference for Global Transformation AND then be able to Journal for the Conference for Global Transformationpresent a poster about it during the conference this past weekend. In addition I was lucky enough to have lunch with one of the keynote speakers. Who, you ask? Amy D. Waterman, Ph.D.

This is one important person to us. She has changed the face of pre dialysis and transplant education globally by starting “an educational nonprofit corporation and has been awarded more than $20 million in grants…she has reached tens of thousands of people to date, educating them in the miracle of live organ donation. Last year, Dr. Waterman was invited to the White House to share about the possibility of ending the organ donor shortage.” This material is from the Journal of the 2017 Conference for Global Transformation, Volume 17, No. 1.

This is exactly what we need to do for early and moderate stage CKD. This is what the social media presence, the blogs, and the books are about. And you know what? That’s just.plain.not.enough. Last I heard, I have 107,000 readers in 106 countries. And you know what? That’s just.plain.not.enough. Am I greedy? Absolutely when it comes to sharing awareness of CKD. Do I know how to expand my coverage? Nope…not yet, that is. I am so very open to suggestions? Let me hear them!

K.E.E.P.Lest we forget, this year’s first Path of Wellness Screening will be Saturday, June 17th at the Indo American Cultural Center’s community hall, 2809 W. Maryland Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85017. As they’ve stated, “The free screening events can process up to 200 people.  Their use of point-of-care testing devices provides blood and urine test results in a matter of minutes, which are reviewed onsite by volunteer physicians.  All screening participants are offered free enrollment in chronic disease self-management workshops.  Help is also given to connect participants with primary care resources.  The goals of PTW are to improve early identification of at-risk people, facilitate their connection to health care resources, and slow the progression of chronic diseases in order to reduce heart failure, kidney failure and the need for dialysis.”

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

At Last: Cuba

img_4287I’ve been saying for a couple of weeks now that I would write about Cuba, or rather The Republic of Cuba since that is the country’s official title. That’s where I spent my Groundhog’s Day 70th birthday in the company of my husband, brother, and sister-in-law. By the way, whenever we travel together, they are the best part of the trip no matter what we see or where we go.

But I digress; Cuba is a beautiful country with friendly people and colorful buildings painted in those colors the government approves … in addition to free education and free medical care. Considering Cuba is a country run by The Communist Party, maybe this universal medical and education isn’t as free as we might think.

Let’s take a look at the education first since you can’t have nephrologists without education. While there is free education, you need to be loyal to the government and perform community service as the ‘price’ of receiving it. I wasn’t clear about how you demonstrated “loyal to the government,” but the Cubanos (as the Cuban people refer to themselves) politely declined to discuss this.

The education includes six years of basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic – the same 3 Rs we study in grade school in the USA. After that, there are three years of img_4006middle school with traditional school subjects that are taught pretty much anywhere. But then things change. Cubanos can attend what we might consider a traditional high school for three years or a vocational school for three years.  This is also when marching in parades and community service begins.

Nephrologists would have chosen the traditional high school. After that, there’s another five to six years of university for their medical degree. Not everyone attends university; students need to pass certain exams in order to be allowed to attend… something we’re used to hearing. So now our doctor has become a doctor. What additional education is needed to become a nephrologist?

I tried to question the people I met in ports of call, but again they declined to answer in full. From the little bit I got from them and the even less I could garner from the internet: all medical students need to do a residency in General Medicine. If you want to go on to a specialty – like Nephrology – you need to do an additional residency in that field.

Well, what about the medicine itself? What do Cubano doctors know about nephrology?

According to Radio Angulo – Cuba’s information radio – on November 23 of last year,

img_4040“The positive development of this specialty began with the triumph of the Revolution in 1959, as Dr. Charles Magrans Buch, full professor and professor emeritus, told Granma International. Magrans began practicing his profession in 1958 in the Clinico de 26, today the Joaquin Albarran Clinical-Surgical Teaching Hospital, home to the Dr. Abelardo Buch Lopez Institute of Nephrology.”

Granma International describes itself as The Official Voice of the Communist Party of Cuba Central Committee.

As for the quality of the medical schools,

“…Cuba trains young physicians worldwide in its Latin American School of Medicine (ELAM). Since its inception in 1998, ELAM has graduated more than 20,000 doctors from over 123 countries. Currently, 11,000 young people from over 120 nations follow a career in medicine at the Cuban institution.”  You can read more about ELAM in Salim Lamrani’s blog in the 8/8/14 edition of The Huffington Post at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/salim-lamrani/cubas-health-care-system-_b_5649968.html

Yesterday, I stumbled upon this which is also from Granma: “The Cuban Institute of Nephrology is celebrating its 50th anniversary this December 1st, having provided more than 5,000 kidney transplants and 3,125 patients with dialysis.”

So, nephrology is not new to Cuba nor is there a dearth of opportunities to study this specialty. Keep in mind that this is government run health care. There aren’t img_4142any private clinics or hospitals in Cuba.

And how good is that health care system? This is from the 4/9/14 HavanaTimes.org:

“Boasting health statistics above all other countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (and even the United States), Cuba’s healthcare system has achieved world recognition and been endorsed by the World and Pan-American Health Organizations and the United Nations.”

HavanaTimes.org is not part of the government. Some of their writers have been blacklisted, while others have been questioned. Somehow, that makes me feel more secure that their information is not the party line but more truthful. I don’t mean to say the government is dishonest, but I prefer information from private sources in this case.

Before you get your passport in order and book a trip to Cuba for medical reasons, you should know  “…it is not legal for Americans to go to Cuba as medical tourists….” This information is from Cuba Medical Travel Adviser & Guide at http://www.doctorcuba.com/. What I found curious is that it is not illegal for Cuban doctors to treat American patients in Cuba. Do Americans disguise themselves as being from other countries to obtain the low cost, high quality medical treatment Cuba has to offer? How can they do that if a passport is needed to enter the country? Maybe I’m naïve.

img_4213Cuban medicine follows a different model than that of the USA. A general (family) doctor earns about $20 a month with free housing and food.  His or her mornings are spent at the clinic with the afternoons reserved for house calls. Doctors treat patients and/or research. Preventive medicine is the norm with shortages of medication and supplies a constant problem.

You have to remember that I have limited access to information about Cuba (as does the rest of the world), and am not so certain my even more limited Spanish – which is not even Cubano Spanish – and the limited English of the Cubanos I spoke with has allowed me to fully understand the answers I was given to the questions I asked.

It’s been fun sharing what I think I learned with you since it brought the feeling of being in Cuba right back. Can you hear the music?  I’ve got to get up to dance.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!IMG_2979

Maybe for You, But Not for Me

hairLast week, when I wrote about thinning hair, I received loads of suggestions. While I was pleased with all the interaction, it was clear to me that we had people answering from three different positions: pre-dialysis (like me at Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease), dialysis, and post-transplant. What also became clear is that the ‘rules’ for each position are different. That got me to wondering.

But first, I think a definition of each of these is necessary. My years teaching English ingrained in me that ‘pre’ is a prefix meaning before; so pre-dialysis means before dialysis. In other words, this is CKD stages 1-4 or 5 depending upon your nephrologist. It’s when there is a slow progression in the decline of your kidney function.

I remembered a definition of dialysis that I liked in SlowItDownCKD 2015, and so, decided to repeat it here.IMG_2980

“According to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/dialysisinfo,

‘Dialysis is a treatment that does some of the things done by healthy kidneys. It is needed when your own kidneys can no longer take care of your body’s needs. There are several different kinds of dialysis. Basically, they each eliminate the wastes and extra fluid in your blood via different methods.’”

And post -transplant?  Simply put, it means after having had an kidney (or other organ) placed in your body to replace one that doesn’t work anymore.

I know as a pre-dialysis that I have certain dietary restrictions.  Readers have told me some of theirs and they’re very different. It’s not the usual difference based on lab results that will tell you whether you need to cut back more on one of the electrolytes this quarter. It seemed like an entirely different system.

FullSizeRender (2)Let’s go back to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease to see what my basic dietary restrictions as a pre-dialysis CKD patient are.

 “The (e.g. renal) diets seem to agree that protein, sodium, phosphorus and potassium need to be limited. … Apparently, your limits may be different from mine or any other patient’s.  In other words, it’s personalized.”

Well, what about those on dialysis? What do their dietary guidelines look like? I found this in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“Knowing End Stage Renal Disease is not my area of expertise, I took a peek at National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), A service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)National Institutes of Health (NIH), at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/eatright/index.aspx#potassium anyway to see what dialysis patients can eat.

“Potassium is a mineral found in many foods, especially milk, fruits, and vegetables. It affects how steadily your heart beats. Healthy kidneys keep FullSizeRender (3)the right amount of potassium in the blood to keep the heart beating at a steady pace. Potassium levels can rise between dialysis sessions and affect your heartbeat. Eating too much potassium can be very dangerous to your heart. It may even cause death.”

I suspected that potassium is not the only dietary problem for dialysis and dug a bit more.  I discovered this information on MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=78054, along with the caveat that these also need to be individualized as per lab results.

  1. Fluids: Allowance is based primarily on the type of dialysis and urine output. If you have any edema, are taking a diuretic, and/or have congestive heart failure, your allowance will be adjusted.
  2. Sodium: This will be modified to maintain blood pressure and fluid control and to help prevent congestive heart failureand pulmonary edema.
  3. Potassium: Your intake of this will be adjusted to prevent your blood levels from going too high or too low.
  4. bananaPhosphorus: The majority of dialysis patients require phosphate binders and dietary restrictions in order to control their blood phosphorus levels.
  5. Protein: Adequate protein is necessary to maintain and replenish your stores. You may be instructed on increasing your intake now that you are on dialysis.
  6. Fiber: There is a chance that constipation may be a problem due to fluid restrictions and phosphate binders, so it’s important to keep fiber intake up. You will need guidance on this because many foods that are high in fiber are also high in potassium.
  7. Fat: Depending on your blood cholesterol levels, you may need to decrease your intake of trans fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.
  8. Calories: If you are over or underweight, you will be instructed on adjusting the amount of calories that you take in each day.
  9. Calcium: Most foods that contain calcium also contain phosphorus. Due to your phosphorus restrictions, you will need guidance on how to get enough calcium while limiting your intake of phosphorus.

Big difference here!  More protein, less calcium, phosphate binders, fat and calcium. No wonder the responses I got to last week’s blog were so varied.

And post-transplant? What about those dietary restrictions? The Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/kidney-transplant/manage/diet-nutrition/nuc-20209734 has that one covered, with the same warning as the other two groups’ diets: your labs dictate your amounts.

  • Eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each dayfruits and veggies
  • Avoiding grapefruit and grapefruit juice due to its effect on a group of immunosuppression medications (calcineurin inhibitors)
  • Having enough fiber in your daily diet
  • Drinking low-fat milk or eating other low-fat dairy products, which is important to maintain optimal calcium and phosphorus levels
  • Eating lean meats, poultry and fish
  • Maintaining a low-salt and low-fat diet
  • Following food safety guidelines
  • Staying hydrated by drinking adequate water and other fluids each day

So it looks like you get to eat more servings of fruits and vegetables a day, must avoid grapefruit and its juice, and be super vigilant about calcium and phosphorus levels. Notice the same suggestion to have enough fiber in your diet as when on dialysis.

Whoa! We have three different sets of diet guidelines for three different stages of CKD, along with the strict understanding that everything depends upon your lab results. That means that the post-transplant patients were right – for them – that I needed more protein.  And the dialysis patients were right – for them – too. But for the pre-dialysis patients? Nope, got to stay below five ounces daily. IMG_2982

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Will This Really Be Possible?

Are you so busy in this period between Thanksgiving and Chanukah/Christmas/Kwaanza/ whatever other celebration I don’t know about that you haven’t had the chance to keep up with the chronic kidney disease world?  Relax: that’s what this blog is for.  Besides, this may very well be a gift for you – albeit not this year. Honestly, I’d settle for this gift anytime before I hit the need for dialysis.

If you’ve read the book or the earliest blogs, you know I have an irrational revulsion toward dialysis.  It’s an emotional reaction and one that rears its ugly head every time I think about the process.  Maybe I don’t have to have that reaction any more.  Maybe dialysis won’t be necessary any more.  I know I sound delusional, but let’s hold off on that opinion until after you read this article from MedIndia. It’s a bit long, but well worth the read.

Hope for Treating Chronic Kidney Disease Via Regeneration of Specialized Cells

                 by Kathy Jones on  December 06, 2011 at 7:26 PM                         Genetics & Stem Cells News        
Pedocytes are specialized type of epithelial cells in the kidney, which get damaged in more than 90 percent of all chronic kidney disease cases.
 
 Hope for Treating Chronic Kidney Disease Via Regeneration of Specialized Cells
Now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have uncovered an unexpected pathway that reveals for the first time how these cells may regenerate and renew themselves during normal kidney function.

This finding is an important step toward one day therapeutically coaxing the cells to divide, which could be used to treat people with chronic kidney disease.

“Researchers have studied these cells for years, but the prevailing view has been that they don’t renew themselves,” said associate professor of medicine Steven Artandi, MD, PhD. “Now we’ve found that podocytes can enter and leave the cell cycle in response to certain common signaling pathways.”

Artandi is the senior author of the study, which will be published online Dec. 4 in Nature Medicine. The first author of the work is former postdoctoral scholar Marina Shkreli, PhD, who is now at the Laboratory of Biology and Pathology of Genomes at the University of Nice in France.

Podocytes are found only in the kidney and are an integral structural component of its blood-filtering system. They stand shoulder-to-shoulder in a part of the organ called the glomerulus and wrap their long “feet” around the semi-permeable capillaries through which blood flows. Narrow slits between the feet allow small molecules, such as water and salts, to pass while blocking large proteins.

This filtering process is the first step to forming urine, and it is critically important — even one missing cell can leave a gap that would allow unwanted molecules through the barrier. (Imagine wrapping your hands around a length of leaky garden hose so that the water seeps out between your fingers. Lift up one finger and you’re liable to get sprayed in the face.)

This may be why previous researchers searching for signs of self-renewal in podocytes were unsuccessful, because any such renewal or replacement would likely need to be carefully orchestrated to avoid compromising the filtration system. As a result, scientists have been forced to conclude that the podocytes rarely, if ever, divided.

“It used to be thought that you were born with podocytes, and you died with the same podocytes — you don’t make any more during your lifetime,” said Artandi. The only exception was certain rare types of kidney disease in which the podocytes abandon their blood-filtration duties en masse to de-differentiate into less-specialized, dividing cells that little resemble their predecessors. As a result, the glomerulus collapses and the patients’ kidneys begin to fail. One such disease is HIV-associated nephropathy, or HIVAN.

The problem was, such a scenario doesn’t make a lot of evolutionary sense — particularly when other epithelial cells routinely regenerate themselves. “Podocytes are vitally important, and are also under enormous physical stress,” said Artandi. “It’s hard to understand why we would have such a vulnerable blood-filtration system.”

To understand more about kidney biology, Artandi and Shkreli investigated the role of a protein component of the telomerase complex called TERT. Although telomerase is best known as an enzyme involved in cell aging, recent research in Artandi’s lab and others have shown that TERT also plays a role in many types of cellular regeneration.

The researchers found that temporarily increasing the expression of TERT in adult, otherwise healthy laboratory mice caused the formerly stolid podocytes to abruptly de-differentiate and begin dividing. As a result, the glomerulus collapsed in a way that resembles what happens in humans with HIVAN. Conversely, ceasing the overexpression allowed the cells to stop dividing, re-specialize and resume their normal functions.

When Artandi and Shkreli looked closely at the glomeruli in humans with HIVAN, they found that TERT expression was increased. Equally important, the Wnt signaling pathway, which is important in embryonic development and in the self-renewal of stem cells, was also activated. (Previous research in the Artandi lab has linked telomerase activity to the Wnt pathway.)  Blocking Wnt signaling in a mouse model of HIVAN also stopped the podocytes from dividing and improved their function.

“The implication is that podocytes may utilize recognized pathways of regeneration to renew themselves throughout life,” said Artandi. People suffering from chronic kidney disease may simply have worn out or outpaced their podocytes’ capacity for renewal, he believes.

Now that the researchers know podocytes have the ability regenerate in response to common cellular signals, their next step is to learn whether this regeneration occurs in healthy animals and people. “If we can harness this regeneration,” Artandi said, “we may one day be able to treat people with chronic kidney disease.”

In addition to Artandi and Shkreli, other Stanford researchers involved in the study include medical resident Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD; graduate students Matthew Pech and Peggie Cheung; medical student Woody Chang; lab manager Stephanie Brockman; former research assistant Eunice Lee; research associate Frank Kuhnert, PhD; and associate professor of medicine Calvin Kuo, MD, PhD.

The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Stanford School of Medicine, the Stanford Center on Longevity and the Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging at Stanford. Information about Stanford’s Department of Medicine, which also supported the work, is available at http://medicine.stanford.edu.

The URL for this article is  http://www.medindia.net/news/Hope-for-Treating-Chronic-Kidney-Disease-Via-Regeneration-of-Specialized-Cells-94388-1.htm

On the book front, Nima Beckie – a columnist for Skorch and my daughter, the writer – recommended the book as a Christmas gift.  That was an unexpected gift from daughter to mother!  Don’t forget the book signing at Next Coffee Company, 19420 N 59 Ave., Glendale, Az. 85308; I really enjoy meeting my readers in person.  Looking ahead to the new year, there’s a twitter chat coming up in January, another radio show in March (which is National Kidney Month) and possibly another book signing along the way. I hadn’t realized that getting my book into the hands of every newly diagnosed Chronic Kidney Disease patient would be so much fun!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!