Good Bye To 2012 And Its Obesity

Today is the last day of 2012.  That means you can start your new year’s resolutions tomorrow.  When you’re done laughing, think about it.  We new-years-eve-celebrations-live-streammake resolutions intending to keep them – at least I do – but something happens right about March something or other.  We tend to forget what they are.

We could look at it another way.  Pollyanna over here likes this way better.  What has become part of your life as a former new year’s resolution?  For me, it’s the renal diet and exercise.  I actually feel bad when I can’t exercise now.

There’s hope for me in the form of a possible cortisone injection to lubricate that hip that has eroded so much that it is bone on bone. I know you were really worried about that [she wrote tongue in cheek].

Sometimes we need motivation to even think of resolutions.  Jody Charnow provided that for me in the Dec. 26th issue of Renal and Urology News:

 

Overweight, Obesity Raise Kidney Disease Risk

A large study conducted in Thailand corroborates previous findings showing that overweight and obesity are associated with an increased likelihood of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Subjects with CKD had a significantly higher mean BMI than those without CKD (25.36 vs. 24.04), as well as a significantly higher prevalence of abdominal obesity (35.7% vs. 25.3%). The investigators defined abdominal obesity as a waist circumference of 90 cm (That’s 35 7/16 inches for the math challenged like me) or greater for men and greater than 80 cm (This one is about 31 and a half inches) for women.

You can read the rest of the article at http://www.renalandurologynews.com/overweight-obesity-raise-kidney-disease-risk/article/273848/#

IMAG0093My poor dog, Bella, keeps waiting for me to walk with her.  Can’t be done until the hip is taken care of.  Believe me, I tried.  But it’s not just Bella’s disappointment, it’s mine too.  I saw the pictures from Christmas Eve.  Not good, boys and girls.  How am I going to get my BMI under control without exercise?

Just in case you don’t remember, BMI means Body Mass Index or a way of measuring the fat content of your body based on your height and weight.  If you have the fortitude, you can make use of the BMI calculator at http://nhlbisupport.com/bmi/  I just did and I can tell you this is not for the faint of heart. I was a thinner young woman.  I can even prove it!  early headshots (Pardon the cigarette pix.  This was a long, long time ago.) My goal is to lose weight and be healthier.  This picture is another motivation (thank you for finding it, Nima), even though I realize my thinner 65 year old body is not going to look anything like my thinner 25 year old body.

So why all the whining about not being able to exercise, you ask.  Read that article excerpt again.  I already have stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease.  How much worse do you think a lack of exercise – which leads to weight gain – is going to make my ckd?  Technically (I just had to qualify that), I already am obese.  I’m not that vain, but I want to stay at stage 3 for the rest of my life and avoid dialysis completely.  This is not the way to do it.

Let’s try this another way – for those of you who can walk – untreated hypertension (high blood pressure) may also be one of the causes of ckd.  According to http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/easy-steps-reduce-blood-pressure-article-1.1226714, exercise can lower your blood pressure.  We already know that obesity is another possible cause of ckd.  Here’s the good part: while you’re walking to lower your blood pressure, you’re also exercising which means you’re losing weight if you’re consistent enough. Wow!  Two for one here!

I found surprising information in that article.  Who knew that fructose raises your blood pressure?  The only time I’d heard it mentioned as a medical deficit is at the immunologist’s. According to http://www.immunologist.com, an immunologist is, “A specialist concentrating on allergic diseases and those disease processes that involve the immune system.”  She had warned me that fructose should be avoided if you have allergies.

Potassium may also be a key in lowering your blood pressure.  I’ve been draining my canned fruit and only occasionally having a fresh (oh, all right, HALF a fresh) banana to control my potassium intake.  Guess what.  My blood pressure has gone up.  Maybe I shouldn’t be that surprised.

Oh no! The article also suggests losing weight.  Looks like it always comes back to the same thing.  A thinner body is a healthier body as long as we don’t go past thinner to obscenely thin.

Book CoverAh, I forgot to mention other new year’s resolutions that have become part of my life.  I blog about ckd every week.  This started out as a way to publicize What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease (Amazon.com and B&N.com – print and digital), but soon took on a life of its own. Another new year’s resolution that has become a way of life is posting some ckd related news on the facebook page for the book (https://www.facebook.com/WhatHowearlyCKD).  Say, that’s not bad for new year’s resolutions.

You know how some people announce the addition of grand-children?  I do believe we’re going to be announcing our new grand-animals for quite a while before we get to grand-children. Here’s the newest, as yet unnamed, addition to the family, Lara’s new pal. Each of my biological daughters has a cat and my other step-daughter has both a dog and a cat. We are a pet loving family.Lara and Dog

Until next YEAR,

Keep living your life.

As I Sneeze My Way Through Life

Let me first open this up to you: if you were newly diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease and were stunned by your diagnose, where would you  look for information first ?  I ask because whatever you answer  is where I’ll be donating copies of the books.  While I’d love to make back my initial investment, the book was never meant to be a money maker for me. What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was written so no one else would have to endure the fear I did when I was first diagnosed.  It took me too long to gather the information I needed in a way I could understand it so that my fear could abate.  Why should anyone else have to endure that? Answer: There is NO reason.

Anyone ever hear of Landmark Education?  My daughter, Abby, gave me this seminar as a gift for my 65th birthday back in February.  I’d seen how it transformed her life and was definitely curious.  Guess what.  It is not a “cult.”  This seminar is REQUIRED by the Pentagon (I know that’s not a great endorsement to some people) and The Air Force Academy.  Before you decide it’s military, Buddhist monks, Trappist monks, schools, companies, families, and just plain people like you and me take their courses.  I think of it as learning how to get out of your own way so you can create whatever you want in your life.  I’m still me after the weekend seminar, but I’m a me who has found the joy in her life again.  I’m a pretty happy person, but that joy was slowly ebbing  away without my realizing it.  Not anymore.  I’ll like the whole world to learn this way of thinking about yourself so each and every person can get out of their own way and have a happy, productive life.  Thank you, Abby.

The sneezing.  Ah, yes, I was going to write about the sneezing.  Ever since I was a teenager and got a kitten for my Sweet Sixteen (hey, that is all I wanted), I knew I’m allergic to cats.  That didn’t stop me from always having cats, though.  I just bought more tissues and had chronically red eyes.  Once I had kids, they always had multiple cats in the house.  And, again, I just bought more tissues and put up with red eyes.

Then I moved out to Arizona.  That was almost ten years ago. I noticed the cat allergy got worse, but that was okay because my last child had moved out and taken her cats with her. But, wait, what was this?  Certain kinds of dogs made me sneeze, too.  Luckily, not my sweet Bella who is part Australian Cattle Dog and part German Short-Haired Pointer.  I was becoming uncomfortable and going back to the sneezing and need for lots of tissues without a cat in the house and with a dog who didn’t cause these symptoms.  What made it never worse is that I love fresh air and would keep the doors and windows opened until it hit 90 degrees each day.

It was easy enough to figure out these were allergies, but I thought because I had Chronic Kidney Disease that I couldn’t do anything about it.  When my primary care doctor suggested they were keeping me up at night (which meant I wasn’t getting the eight hours of sleep a night CKDers need), she suggested I see an allergist to see what, if anything, could be done to alleviate the situation.  Thank you, Dr. Zhao of Deer Valley Family Medicine, for suggesting I see Dr.Ching at Arizona Asthma & Allergy Institute.

It turned out that I am not only allergic to cats and certain breeds of dogs, but I now have allergies to weeds and plants that don’t live back East.  I had been exposing myself to vast amounts of pollen from Firebush, Kochia, Mesquite (ack!  I planted one outside my office window when I bought this house), juniper, white mulberry and the list goes on and on.  I could have simply sealed myself into my house with its no-air-gets-though windows and arcadia doors, but that wouldn’t have worked.  I need open windows. I need open doors. To me, they are  as essential as food.

Dr. Ching carefully explained to me that we could start a regimen of injections but it would take a long time to build up the antibodies.  I didn’t really care about that since I was getting sort of tired of red eyes and always having a tissue clutched in my hand.  I was concerned about what was in those injections. Once she explained, I had one of those why-didn’t-I-conside-this years ago moments.  They contained minute portions of each of the substances I was allergic to.  There were no chemicals in them to exit via the kidneys.  In other words, they were safe for a CKDer like me.

This is how allergy shots work: “Allergy shots work like a vaccine. Your body responds to the injected amounts of a particular allergen (given in gradually increasing doses) little by little, developing a resistance and tolerance to it. Allergy shots can lead to decreased, minimal or no allergy symptoms when you are again exposed to the allergen(s) in the shot.” You can read the rest of this explantation about immunotherapy at: http://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/at-a-glance/allergy-shots.aspx

Until next week,

a less sneezy, red-eyed Gail suggests you

Keep living your life!