Zap!

To my surprise, hair started growing back in unexpected places after I finished chemotherapy. One place was my face. My face! And quite a bit of it, more than a bearded person would have. At least, that’s how it looked to me. I was surprised no one mentioned it to me, but supposed they were just glad I was still alive. I wasn’t worried. I’d just use laser hair removal… or would I? I do have Chronic Kidney Disease.

What did that mean as far as the laser hair removal? I remembered from when I’d had it done on the mustache area about seventeen years ago that it doesn’t work on white hair. No problem with this currently. This facial hair was growing in black and thick.

My goodness, you’d think I’d just be thankful to be alive at this point, too. But as is often attributed to Mr. Shakespeare, “Vanity, thy name is woman.” (Actually, he wrote “Frailty, thy name is woman,” but no one seems to remember that.) So, time to explore what CKD limits there are with laser hair removal.

Let’s start at the beginning with what it is. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/beauty/laser-hair-removal#1  explained it this way:

“Laser hair removal is one of the most commonly done cosmetic procedures in the U.S. It beams highly concentrated light into hair follicles. Pigment in the follicles absorb the light. That destroys the hair.”

Just in case you need reminders,

“A hair follicle is a tunnel-shaped structure in the epidermis (outer layer) of the skin. Hair starts growing at the bottom of a hair follicle. The root of the hair is made up of protein cells and is nourished by blood from nearby blood vessels.

As more cells are created, the hair grows out of the skin and reaches the surface. Sebaceous glands near the hair follicles produce oil, which nourishes the hair and skin.”

Thank you to Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/hair-follicle#anatomy for that information. Notice I specified hair follicles since there are other kinds of follicles.

What else might we need defined. Oh yes, pigment. I used the definition of pigmentation instead since it was less convoluted to my way of thinking. The ‘ation’ part just means the action or process of whatever we’re discussing – in this case pigment. MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=9681  tells us it’s:

“The coloring of the skin, hair, mucous membranes, and retina of the eye. Pigmentation is due to the deposition of the pigment melanin, which is produced by specialized cells called melanocytes.”

Now, the limitations with CKD – if any. In the last 17 years, I’ve learned that not only wouldn’t white hair respond to laser hair removal, but gray and blonde won’t either. It will also be less effective on red hair. It all has to do with your melanin.

Whoa! This was unexpected. I not only did NOT find any research warning about CKD and laser hair removal, but found some that endorsed it. For instance, The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which is part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, which in turn is part of the National Institutes of Health, which is connected to PubMed at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30005102.

“Laser hair reduction is a well-established modality for a wide range of medical indications. Laser hair reduction can be beneficial for hemodialysis patients who undergo repeated adhesive tape application and removal at their hemodialysis site during hemodialysis sessions. There is a paucity of published literature on efficacious laser hair removal treatments for hemodialysis patients. Herein, we present a case of a 50-year-old male (Fitzpatrick III) with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis, who achieved successful laser hair reduction at his hemodialysis vascular access site with five sessions of a neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1064 nm) to improve his quality of life by reducing the hair burden at the adhesive tape site application. We recommend providing this safe and effective hair reduction treatment option for hemodialysis patients given the decreased quality of life associated with end stage renal disease and hemodialysis. J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(7):794-795.”

Let me translate the medicalese. This abstract means that using laser hair removal around the patient’s access site for dialysis made his life easier (and less painful) since the tape wasn’t sticking to his arm hair anymore. We all know how painful taking off adhesive anything can be if body hair is involved.

I have dug around in my computer for hours and hours. That’s all I found about laser hair removal and Chronic Kidney Disease. That’s the great thing about keeping an open mind; you find some unexpected information.

Here’s hoping you had a fun Halloween and didn’t eat too much candy, especially if you’re diabetic.

Talking about food, are you aware of Mrs. Dash’s seasonings for use instead of salt? It’s come to the point where I can taste even a teeny bit of salt. After almost a decade of not using salt, I’ve lost my taste for it… but Mrs. Dash? How does lemon pepper seasoning sound to you? Or garlic and herb? There are about 28 different flavors of seasoning. Go to the website at https://www.mrsdash.com/ to see for yourself. They also make marinades which was news to me. I usually choose the less spicy seasonings, but they have some zingers that you spicy food loving CKD patients will probably enjoy more.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Dialysis is Now Old Enough to Have Its Own Museum

You know kidney disease advocates sort of bond together, right? I somehow magically ran across Steve Weed, a two time transplant recipient who has his own web development company that specializes in social media planning: Landau Digital Solutions. Actually, he unwittingly led me to the publisher of my first book: What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease before I even knew what he did for a living. But I digress.

While recovering from his recent transplant, Steve posted about visiting a dialysis museum. I found myself mystified that such a thing existed. Wasn’t dialysis only about fifty years old? Who had a museum about such a young invention?

Then I realized that I had never written about the history of dialysis. Maybe it was older. So I did a little digging for us. Will you look at that! The idea of dialysis is much older than I’d thought. This is from Renal Med at http://www.renalmed.co.uk/history-of/haemodialysis:

“Scottish chemist Thomas Graham, known as the ‘father of dialysis’, first described dialysis in 1854. He used osmosis to separate dissolved substances and remove water through semi-permeable membranes, although he did not apply the method to medicine

He worked as a chemist in Glasgow University at around the same time as physician Richard Bright was describing the clinical features and diagnosis of renal failure in Edinburgh. He noticed that crystalloids were able to diffuse through vegetable parchment coated with albumin (which acted as a semi-permeable membrane). He called this ‘dialysis’. Using this method he was able to extract urea from urine. Graham prepared a bell-shaped vessel….”­

This was the seed that later became hemodialysis, which is defined by MedlinePlus (part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine) at https://medlineplus.gov/dialysis.html in the following way:

“Hemodialysis uses a machine. It is sometimes called an artificial kidney. You usually go to a special clinic for treatments several times a week.”

The difference in spelling is due to the variations between British English and American English.

Another step in dialysis becoming dialysis as we know it today is:

“The first human hemodialysis was performed in a uremic patient by (Me: His given name is Georg.) Haas in 1924 at the University of Giessen in Germany…. He used a tubular device made of collodion immersed in dialysate solution in a glass cylinder. Haas was able to calculate that the total non-protein nitrogen removed was 2,772 g. He also showed that the presence of some uremic substances in the dialysate and that water could be removed from the blood. In 1928, he first used the anticoagulant, heparin. In 1937, the first flat hemodialysis membrane made of cellophane was produced, which is produced in similar manner to cellulose, but dissolved in alkali and carbon disulfide…. The resulting solution is then extruded through a slit and washed multiple times to obtain a transparent semipermeable material.”

I found the information on the Advanced Renal Education Program site at https://www.advancedrenaleducation.com/content/history-hemodialysis.

Then, finally, dialysis as we know it. DPC Education Center (Dialysis Patient Citizens) at http://www.dpcedcenter.org/brief-history-dialysis provided this information.

“The history of dialysis dates back to the 1940s. (Me here again: although we know the seeds for the dialysis were planted much earlier.) The first type of dialyzer, then called the artificial kidney, was built in 1943 by Dutch physician Willem Kolff. Kolff had first gotten the idea of developing a machine to clean the blood after watching a patient suffer from kidney failure. When his invention was completed, he attempted to treat over a dozen patients with acute kidney failure over the next two years. Although only one treatment turned out successful, he continued to experiment in improving his design.”

The sources use many words you may not be familiar with. IvyRoses at http://www.ivyroses.com/HumanBody/Urinary/Urinary_System_Kidney_Dialysis.php was able to help us out here.

Parts of a Kidney Dialysis Machine

Dialysis Membrane (sometimes referred to as simply a ‘dialyser’)
Note that there are two types of artificial kidney dialysis in clinical use: Hemodialysis uses a cellulose-membrane tube immersed in fluid, whereas peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of the patient’s abdominal cavity (peritoneum), as a dialysis membrane. This section … only describes the case of hemodialysis.
The “dialyser” part of a kidney dialysis machine consists of a large surface area of cellulose acetate membrane mechanically supported by a plastic structure. Blood is pumped past one side of this membrane while the dialysate fluid passes on the other side. The membrane may be folded-over many times so that the large area of the membrane occupies a practical volume of space.

Dialysate
The dialysate (solution) has the same solute concentrations as those in ordinary plasma. Therefore if the patient’s blood plasma contains excess concentrations of any solutes, these will move into the dialysate, and if the blood plasma lacks the ideal concentration of any solutes, these will move into the patient’s blood. Conversely, the dialysate fluid does not contain any waste products such as urea – so these substances in the patient’s blood move down the concentration gradient into the dialysate.

Anticoagulant
Heparin is the usual anticoagulant that is added to the patient’s blood as it enters the dialysis machine (in order to prevent the blood from clotting as it passes through the machine). Preventing the blood from clotting should, in turn, prevent any blood clots from blocking the filtration surface of the system. However, heparin is not added during the final hour of dialysis in order to enable the patient’s blood clotting activity to return to normal before he or she leaves.”

Finally, I went to the museum site itself for more information. You can find their site at https://www.nwkidney.org/about-us/dialysis-museum/. This important piece of information showed up there.

“It was 1960 when Dr. Belding Scribner and his colleagues at University of Washington developed the Scribner shunt, a device made of Teflon that could link an artery and a vein. This relatively simple device was revolutionary – it made long-term dialysis possible for the first time. Chronic kidney failure was no longer a death sentence.”

So now I know… and so do you. If I ever get out to Seattle again, this museum is on my list of places to visit.

Before I go, The American Kidney Fund asked me to let you know about two webinars this month, both on topics close to my heart… I mean my kidneys. They are Slowing down kidney disease on September 20th and Tips for talking with your doctor on Sept. 25th. Why not mark these on your calendar now while you’re thinking of it?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!