Say That Again

I have been uttering that phrase for years, maybe even a decade. Each time I went for a hearing test, I was told I was getting there, but I didn’t need hearing aids yet. This year it changed. I’ll bet it’s because I have CKD.

This is from SlowItDownCKD  2011:

“Research shows that hearing loss is common in people with moderate Chronic Kidney Disease. As published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases and highlighted on the National Kidney Foundation web site, a team of Australian researchers found that older adults with moderate Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) have a higher prevalence of hearing loss than those of the same age without CKD.”

How moderate CKD and hearing are connected is another matter, one that apparently isn’t as well documented. Here’s what I found on Timpanogos Hearing and Balance’s website at https://utahhearingaids.com/hearing-loss-likely-individuals-chronic-kidney-disease/ and the other sites I searched. This comes from the same Universtiy of Sydney study I cited in my 2011 blog.  A study that was completed in 2010… eight years ago.

“The link between hearing loss and CKD can be explained by structural and functional similarities between tissues in the inner ear and in the kidney. Additionally, toxins that accumulate in kidney failure can damage nerves, including those in the inner ear. Another reason for this connection is that kidney disease and hearing loss share common risk factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and advanced age.”

Wait a minute. I wrote about this in SlowItDownCKD 2014, too:

“Suddenly it became clear. If toxins are – well – toxic to our bodies, that includes our ears. My old friend The Online Etymology Dictionary tells us the word toxic is derived directly from late Latin toxicus, which means ‘poisoned.’

Now I got it. Moderate CKD could be poisoning our bodies with a buildup of toxins. Our ears and the nerves in them are part of our body. Damaged nerves may cause hearing loss. I’d just never thought of it that way before. Sometimes all it takes is that one last piece of the puzzle to fall in place.

Hmmm. High blood pressure is the second most common leading cause of CKD and it can also lead to hearing loss. Let’s take a look at that.

According to WebMD

‘Certain illnesses, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes, put ears at risk by interfering with the ears’ blood supply.’

I went right to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease to figure out how since it includes a diagram from The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health that demonstrates how high blood pressure is caused… and if you read on, you’ll read about the problems high blood pressure causes….and this sentence:

‘Humans have 10 pints of blood that are pumped by the heart through the arteries to all the other parts of the bodies.’

That would include the ears. Moderate CKD might mean that blood is tainted by the toxins our compromised kidneys could not rid us of.”

I was frustrated at not finding any more recent research, but sometimes you just have to take what you can get… like now.

I thought of an online hearing test I’d heard (Ouch! Poor word choice there.) about and decided to give it a try since it asked questions rather than having you listen to sounds as you would in an audiologist’s office. Here are my results from the  Better Hearing Institute at http://www.betterhearing.org/check-your-hearing

“SUMMARY

 Your hearing loss would be described as: Mild Hearing Loss. A hearing test may be necessary to monitor your hearing loss.

DETAIL REPORT

 Your Check Score: You scored 21 out of a possible 60 points. The remainder of this report will tell you what your score means.

Your Check Norm: Your score of 21 is at the 19 percentile of people with hearing loss in the United States, where low percentages mean lower hearing losses and high percentages mean more serious hearing losses compared to other people with hearing loss….

Subjective Hearing Loss Description: Based on the responses of more than 10,000 people with hearing loss and their family members, they would describe your hearing loss as: Mild Hearing Loss.

What Your Hearing Loss Means for Your Quality of Life: Research has shown that the higher your predicted hearing loss, the more likely the following quality-of-life factors may be negatively affected:

  • irritability, negativism and anger
  • fatigue, tension, stress and depression
  • avoidance or withdrawal from social situations
  • social rejection and loneliness
  • reduced alertness and increased risk of personal safety
  • impaired memory and ability to learn new tasks
  • reduced job performance and earning power
  • diminished psychological and overall health

What should you do next? Based on your score, we recommend the following: A hearing test may be necessary to monitor your hearing loss. Now hearing loss is situational, and the next step you take is dependent on your need to hear in various listening situations. Some people can live with mild hearing losses. Others, such as teachers and therapists whose auditory skills are very important for their everyday work, require corrective technology — such as hearing aids — even when their hearing loss is at mild levels. It becomes important for them to do something about their hearing loss so they can function adequately in their work environment….

References:

To review the study this report is based on visit:
http://www.betterhearing.org/hearingpedia/bhi-archives/eguides/validity-and-reliability-bhi-quick-hearing-check

To review research on hearing loss and quality of life visit:
www.betterhearing.org/hearingpedia/counseling-articles-tips/impact-treated-hearing-loss-quality-life as well as the following publication conducted by the National Council on the Aging (NCOA):
Hearing Aids and Quality of Life

My audiologist will be introducing me to hearing aids in the new year. I thought I had considered all the ramifications of CKD. And, frankly, I thought I understood what was happening to my kidneys. It looks like I did understand the loss of some kidney function… just not how that would affect the rest of my body.

I don’t know whether to break out the duct tape or the crazy glue to keep this aging body in one piece. Are you laughing? Good, because I wanted to have this Chanukah blog leave you in a good mood. I know, I’ll break out the dreidles in your honor. Happy Chanukah!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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A Meta Is Going to Come? Shouldn’t That Be A Change is Going to Come?

Victorian clockYou may notice the blog is late today.  Blame the flu.  Scratch that.  I’ll take responsibility.  While I was debating whether or not it was time to take the flu shot all Chronic Kidney Disease patients are urged to take each year, the flu found me.  No kidding about this compromised immune system business.  I considered this a light case, but was just ordered back to bed… after over a week of laying low.

Keep in mind that this year’s flu’s vaccine only covers three or four of the many strains around, so you may end up with the flu even after having the shot.  My family doctor’s advice?  Once you’re well again have the inoculation and protect yourself from as many strains as you can.flu shot

Dr. Jamal Attalla is my new nephrologist and also a Landmark Graduate.  That’s where I met him way before I even knew he is a nephrologist.  I like that he is non-alarmist, non-paternalistic and easy going.  When I told him that 50 as an eGFR reading was my panic point, he very gently reminded me that readings will vary within a range depending on the day, your hydration, etc. – all variable factors.  I knew that.

Then he reminded me that after 35, we lose about 1% of our kidney function yearly.  I was under the impression it was ½% annually and thought that started at a much later age.  Finally, we talked about my reading of 48%. But I understood better now how that happened and am confident I can raise it again before I see him a year from now.

Enough about me, let’s get to that metabolic syndrome.  Oh, wait, that’s about me too.

Kibow has sent me quite a bit of information about using their probiotics as a method of treating chronic kidney disease.  I need to warn you that this is not an endorsement of their product.  I don’t know enough about it yet.

Along with their press release, they sent me a booklet entitled Kibow’s Educational Guide to Probiotics and Kidney Health written by Natarajan Ranganathan, Ph.D. and Henry D’Silva, M.D.  In the booklet, they discuss metabolic syndrome.  This part of that discussion lists five conditions in metabolic syndrome.  Only three are necessary to diagnose the syndrome:

“1. Abdominal obesity

2. high blood pressure

3. high blood sugarapple shaped

4. low levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol

5. high triglycerides”

I’d first heard about metabolic syndrome two years ago when I met an Aussie nurse at a friend’s house.  She assumed I knew all about it.  When I told her I didn’t and asked her to explain, she promised a coffee date to do just that.  We never had the date since she was called home quite suddenly and I forgot about the syndrome.

Then Kibow sent me their material.  Except for the high triglycerides and low levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol, I have all these conditions.  Granted, the abdominal obesity is self-diagnosed but you’d have to be blind (and I’m not yet) to miss it.

So what’s the big deal about metabolic syndrome?  By the way, meta does mean change.  According to The National Institutes on their Institute of Heart, Lungs, and Blood page at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/-topics/ms/:

“The term ‘metabolic’ refers to the biochemical processes involved in the body’s normal functioning. Risk factors are traits, conditions, or habits that increase your chance of developing a disease.”

The National Institutes is a fount of information on all topics that deal with your health.

heart attackAgain, the same question: what’s the big deal about metabolic syndrome?  Usually it’s stated backwards for Chronic Kidney Disease patients.  The MayoClinic at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/metabolic%20syndrome/DS00522  tells us:

“Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions — increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels — that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.”

Sometimes, Chronic Kidney Disease is mentioned as one of the diseases this syndrome puts you at risk for.  We, however, already have that, so why should we try to either avoid the syndrome completely or ameliorate it if we do have it?

Before I was diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease, I joyfully proclaimed Dr. Andrew Weil as my health guru and actually had pretty good health following his suggestions.  This is what he has to say,

“Doctors may also prescribe medications to lower blood pressure, control cholesterol or help you lose weight. Insulin sensitizers like Glucophage (Metformin) may be prescribed to help your body use insulin more effectively. It lowers blood sugar, which also seems to help lower cholesterol and triglycerides as well as decreasing appetite. The side effects of Metformin (often temporary) include nausea, stomach pain, bloating and diarrhea. A more serious side effect, lactic acidosis, can affect those with kidney or liver disease, severe heart failure or a history of alcohol abuse and is potentially, though rarely, fatal. Aspirin therapy is often given to help reduce risk of heart attack and stroke.”

Notice the mention of kidney damage and that of aspirin therapy.  We just can’t take the chance.

Take a look at his article yourself for even more information: http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART03193/Metabolic-Syndrome.html.Dr. Andrew WEil

Sometimes you just have to use your common sense.  We ARE already at risk of heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure as CKD sufferers.  Why would we take a chance of doubling our risk of developing these medical problems?  Don’t forget that while diabetes and high blood pressure can cause CKD, the reverse is true, too.

Kindle has offered me the opportunity to correct two spelling errors in the book.  What I want to know – since they are simple words – is how did spell check (and me for that matter) miss these in the first place? I find it amazing that not one single medical term was misspelled, but these two common words were.Book Cover

Keep an eye out for a new print/digital program they’ll be announcing.  It’s theirs so I’m not at liberty to discuss it until they announce it.  That is a bit of a tease, isn’t it?

Exercise is an essential part of slowing down the progression of your CKD, so kudos to Abby Wegerski (that’s my baby!) and her instruction partner, Tyler Robbins, on the One Year Plus dance celebration for Sustainable Blues this past weekend!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!blues

Frustrated and Wondering

You’ve seen it all over the book’s Facebook page and on Twitter.  Yesterday was my birthday, my 66th birthday to be exact.  “I feel good.  I knew that I would,” as James Brown sings when someone calls me.  But what does my, uh, advanced age mean to my kidneys?James Brown

According to my nephrologist, I would lose 1/2 % of my kidney function each year since I was older.  Interesting… and wrong.  I’ve gained between 9 and 21 points on my GFR in the last five years.  It does vary depending on numerous factors: diet, sleep, exercise, stress, illness.

I had my blood drawn two weeks ago and the results told me that my GFR was 52, down from the 64 it had been only three months before. My primary care doctor told me not to worry about this lower number since I had clearly been incubating the flu at the time of the draw.

Here’s something you haven’t heard from me in a while (she wrote tongue in cheek): that got me to thinking.  What do illness – other than chronic kidney disease – and age have to do with your Glomerular Filtration Rate, a widely accepted indication of just how well your kidneys are functioning?

I found the following chart on The National Kidney Foundation’s website at http://www.kidney.org/professionals/kls/pdf/12-10-4004_KBB_FAQs_AboutGFR-1.pdf

      Average Measured GFR by Age in People Without CKD 

AGE  (Years)                   Average Measured GFR (mL/min/1.73 m2)

20-29                                                      116

30-39                                                      107

40-40                                                        99

50-59                                                        93

60-69                                                        85

70+                                                           75

Notice this is for people without CKD.   Now I’m not a mathematician, as we all know, but if those without our disease lose almost ten points of their GFR each decade they age, why am I not surprised that we who do have Chronic Kidney Disease are expected to be lose the same number of points?

By the way, that does take into account the 1/2% a year I would be losing on my GFR – according to my nephrologist – due to age.  But it’s just not happening.

This is a good place to mention that a reader was infuriated that her nephrologist never told her to double her rate to see where she was on the charts.  She previously had a kidney removed due to cancer and was living with one kidney.

Until she was given that information, she thought she should be on par with those living with two kidneys and was aghast as how low her GFR was.  I can see where her ire would rise (as well as her blood pressure from all that unnecessary worry).

I have been researching for hours and the only answers I’ve found to the question of how the flu affected my GFR were on forums or pay-an-expert-for-a-medical-answer sites.

kidney anatomySorry, folks, I just don’t trust them.  I will be seeing my nephrologist this week and will make it a point to ask him.

When I had the flu, my nephrologist told me to go right ahead and take the over the counter medications my primary physician had suggested and in the dosages recommended on the labels.  He did caution that I not take anything with the letter  ‘d’ in the name since that might raise my blood pressure.

Here’s what DaVita at http://www1.davita.com/3617 has to say about that:

When the flu season hits, the use of treatments for cold and flu soars. These medications often include compounds that can intensify

hypertension and salt retention. Should you require a product to treat cold and/or flu symptoms, it is strongly recommended that you

take them as prescribed by your doctor and carefully read the package instructions.

Notice we still don’t know if the flu affects the GFR.  Although, logically, if hypertension (high blood pressure) affects your kidneys and these medications may raise your blood pressure… perhaps that means they lower your GFR?

These are the kinds of questions that sent me running to interview different nephrologists, rather than trying to research my answers on the internet, when I was writing the book.

Attempting to research these questions brought me to this chart on the site of The National Kidney Disease Education Program – which is a part of The U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services – at http://www.nkdep.nih.gov/learn/testing/understand-gfr.shtml.GFR

I have included it here due to its clarity.  Seeing numbers written doesn’t always make it obvious just what the guidelines are, especially for those of us who think we’re not that good at math.

I certainly do not mean to beg the issue, but I’m getting nowhere looking for definitive answers as to how my age and any other illness such as the flu affect CKD.

We can all see how age and illness affect us as far as appearance, physical use of our body, and even shrinkage (Proof: I am ½ inch shorter due to the compression of the discs between my vertebrae), as well as the coughing, sneezing, and body aches of the flu.

Apparently, you have to be a doctor, or have the vocabulary of one, to be able to understand the connection of these conditions to your GFR.

On another note, The Southwest Nephrology Conference is on March 1 & 2 at Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Resort in Chandler.  That is simply too close to ignore.  I am thinking about going to meet all the specialists I’ve corresponded with from different parts of the country in person.

Could I interest any of you in joining me?  You can read more information about the conference at http://swnc.org/

54603_4833997811387_1521243709_o

I keep forgetting to mention the book!  Since I no longer do book signings or book talks, the only way to get the information out there is for you to buy books for your friends and family.

Hey!  I’m donating as fast as I can! (Wait until my accountant hears about that.)

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

So Is It A Good Thing Or Not?

I cannot begin to tell you how eager I am for the second cataract surgery.  The repaired eye sees so well that the other one seems worse than it really is.

In my big ten minutes of reading at a time while the repaired eye continues to heal, I’ve seen the same word over and over again. It isn’t a word I usually expect to see: statin.  According to Macmillandictionary.com, it means “a drug that is used to reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood.”

 This class of drugs can have a different name in other countries. It preforms its miracle by inhibiting a key enzyme while encouraging the receptor binding of LDL-cholesterol (Low-density lipoprotein which causes health problems and cardiovascular disease), resulting in decreased levels of serum cholesterol (that’s cholesterol in the blood stream) and LDL-cholesterol and increased levels of HDL-cholesterol.

I don’t know about you, but I went running back to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease to remind myself what that all means. From the glossary, I understood that dyslipidemia means abnormal levels of cholesterol, triglycerides or both. Well then, what does HDL-cholesterol do? What else? This so called good cholesterol fights LDL-cholesterol.  This is important because what we call the bad cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) can build up in your arties and may even block them eventually. Look at page 97 in the book for a clear diagram of just how this affects your blood pressure.

Let’s get to the articles now. One from this past June suggests that statins may cause fatigue and that women may experience this more than men. Notice the mention of vitamin D production in the article at:  http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/06/25/hlsb0626.htm

Study links statin use to fatigue

One possible reason is that reducing cholesterol levels can lead to the production of less vitamin D.

All right, I’m a woman.  I take statins. I’m fatigued, but I take vitamin D supplements.  Back to the sleep apnea exploration for me.

Then in July, only one month later, this article appeared in The New York Times:

 Women May Benefit Less From Statins

Many studies have found that statins reduce the risk for recurring cardiac problems, but not the risk for death. Now an analysis suggests that the drugs may reduce mortality significantly only in men.

You can read more about this at: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/02/women-may-benefit-less-from-statins/?partner=rss&emc=rss

Back in February of this year, The New York Times was warning us about the possible side effects of statins, albeit rare ones:

Safety Alerts Cite Cholesterol Drugs’ Side Effects

Federal health officials on Tuesday added new safety alerts to the prescribing information for statins, the cholesterol-reducing medications that are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the world, citing rare risks of memory loss, diabetes and muscle pain.

The entire article is located at: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/29/health/fda-warns-of-cholesterol-drugs-side-effects.html?_r=3

Hmmm, my primary care doctor has been monitoring me for muscle pain since we met.  She has already changed my statins three times in the last five years.  As for the memory loss, who can tell?  I’m at that age, you know. Diabetes can be a problem.  You take statins to reduce your LDL cholesterol so that you don’t end up with high blood pressure, but it may cause diabetes. Which is the lesser of the two evils? Read on for help from USA Today this month to make that decision.

Benefits of cholesterol-cutting drugs outweigh diabetes risk

The benefits of taking cholesterol-lowering medications outweigh the increased risk some patients have of developing diabetes from using the drugs, a report out Thursday says.

Patients who were at higher risk for diabetes were 39% less likely to develop a cardiovascular illness on statins and 17% less likely to die. Patients who were not already at risk for diabetes and were taking statins had a 52% reduction in cardiovascular illness, and no increase in diabetes risk.

“When we focus only on the risk (of diabetes) we may be doing a disservice to our patients,” says lead author Paul Ridker of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. “As it turns out for this data, the hazard of being on a statin is limited almost entirely to those well on their way to getting diabetes.”

Here’s where you can find that article: http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-08-09/statins-diabetes/56920686/1?csp=34news&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+UsatodaycomHealth-TopStories+%28News+-+Health+-+Top+Stories%29

Also this month, there was good news about statins:

 Statins reduce pancreatitis risk

Statins reduce the risk for pancreatitis in patients with normal or mildly elevated triglyceride levels, say the authors of a large meta-analysis.

The address?  It’s: http://www.news-medical.net/news/20120824/Statins-reduce-pancreatitis-risk.aspx

My all time favorite appeared in The New York Times as a blog in March of this year.

Do Statins Make It Tough to Exercise?

For years, physicians and scientists have been aware that statins, the most widely prescribed drugs in the world, can cause muscle aches and fatigue in some patients. What many people don’t know is that these side effects are especially pronounced in people who exercise.

Do read the rest of it at: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/do-statins-make-it-tough-to-exercise/?smid=tw-nytimeswell&seid=auto

I got this smug sense of satisfaction at a hit against exercise… until I realized I still had to exercise so I could keep my organs healthy.  Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

Being in the midst of cataract surgeries, I could not help myself.  I had to include this month’s article from Medical News Today even though it doesn’t mention ckd. The article’s address is: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248785.php

Cataracts Risk Associated With Statins    
     
     

A new study, appearing in the August issue of Optometry and Vision Science , has found that patients might have an increased risk of developing age-related cataracts if they use cholesterol-lowering statin drugs.

We know I’m older and I use cholesterol lowering statins.  But I am getting better eye sight than I ever had (I think).

Note: I may have been too quick to condemn Medical ID Fashions.  The rhodium replacement bracelet they sent when I complained the first bracelet of brass, copper and silver both tarnished and wasn’t waterproof seems to be doing well.  It’s too shiny for me, but it is waterproof and hasn’t tarnished.  I also discovered this company donates $2.00 of every purchase to one of six charities. Maybe they just didn’t receive my first and second emails.

Before I forget, the book is not only available in Europe now, but it’s on sale in India too. Amazing.

I’ve given you enough homework to last more than a week!  Uh-oh, getting back into teacher mode.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!