You’re Bringing What?

I have stayed overnight in the hospital three times in my life: once for a concussion, of which I don’t remember anything (No surprise there.), and twice for the birth of each of my daughters, of which I only remember the actual births. I’m facing a six to thirteen day stay towards the end of the month… and I just don’t know what to bring or why. While it’s not a kidney related stay, as Chronic Kidney Disease patients we all know CKD patients may need to stay in the hospital, too, for transplants,  kidney cancer, or other reasons.

I got a call from the surgeon’s office today. They were able to explain what to bring on the day of surgery: nothing. It seems there are no lockers to hold valuables while you’re in surgery. While I took a breath to contemplate life without my phone and/or iPad, it was explained that I would probably be sleeping until the next day, anyway. I didn’t know that. Hmmm, maybe I’ll just bring a book – a real book – for that first day… just in case I wake up. I can bring a paperback so I won’t care if it’s ‘mislaid.’ Or can I?

All right, enough guessing. Let’s do some researching here. This is from MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/hospital_10_tips_packing_for_a_hospital_stay/views.htm:

  1. Documents and paperwork. Ideally, you should bring all the necessary paperwork in one folder, preferably the kind with a tie or snap closure to guarantee that important documents will not be lost. Don’t forget insurance cards, a list of all the medications you are currently taking, and a list of telephone numbers of family and friends. If you have a written power of attorney or living will, always bring those along with you too.
  2. A small amount of money for newspapers, vending machines, and such. Bringing credit cards or large amounts of cash is not recommended, since theft can occur in hospitals. It is also a good idea to leave all jewelry at home, it is one less thing to worry about losing or being stolen.
  3. Clothing. You may want to bring comfortable pajamas or lounging clothes, if you’ll be able to wear your own clothing. Bring a supply of loose-fitting underwear and comfortable socks …. A cardigan-style sweater or bed jacket can help ward off the chills. Make sure you have slippers to walk around in the hospital and one pair of regular shoes (in case you’re allowed to walk outside, and you’ll need them for the trip home anyway).
  4. Eyeglasses, if you require them.
  5. Writing paper and pen, for making notes or recording questions you want to ask your doctor
  6. A prepaid phone card for calls from your room telephone.
  7. Toiletries. You can bring your toothbrushtoothpaste, lotion, deodorant, soap, shampoo, a comb or hair brush, and other toiletries from home, but avoid perfumes and any highly scented products. Lip balm is also a good addition to your toiletries kit.
  8. Something to occupy your time – Bring books or magazines to help pass the time….
  9. Photos or small personal items. Many people enjoy having a couple of small framed photos or mementos from home to personalize their hospital space.
  10. Finally, check the hospital’s policy about electronic items before you pack your laptop, portable DVD player, MP-3 or CD player, or cell phone. In particular, cell phone use is forbidden in many hospitals since it may interfere with electronic patient monitoring equipment. Don’t forget that high-end electronic items can also be targets for theft – if you are allowed to bring them, make sure that a relative or friend takes them home or that they can be safely stored when you’re sleeping or not in your room.

Now, wait a minute. I get it that MedicineNet may be referring to the day after surgery. But, in my case, that means I prepare a bag and give it to my daughter to bring the next day. The staff at the surgeon’s office did tell me the hospital will provide a toothbrush and toothpaste, but will they allow me to bring the BiPap that I use for sleep apnea or the mouth piece I sleep with to prevent my jaw from locking? Let’s look again.

U.S. News has some of the same items on their list at https://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/slideshows/11-items-to-pack-in-your-hospital-bag?onepage :

To recap, here are 11 items to pack in your hospital bag.

  • Loose, warm and comfortable clothing.
  • Your own pillow.
  • Your own toiletries.
  • Flip-flops.
  • Earplugs and earphones.
  • Comfort flicks.
  • Escapist books.
  • Laundry lists: of your medications, doctors and family and friends.
  • Pen and paper.
  • Scents.
  • Drugstore supplies.”

They also make a really good point about bringing you own medications and toiletries so you’re not being charged for them by the hospital. I would avoid the scents just because so many people are scent sensitive these days.

 

I was still a bit confused, so I went to my hospital’s website. I learned that not only are cell phones permitted, but Wi-Fi is offered for free. Great. What more can I find out about what to pack, I wondered. My biggest desire was for Shiloh, my comfort dog, to be with me but I knew that wasn’t going to happen.

I thought VeryWellHealth at https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-to-pack-for-the-hospital-3157006 was more realistic about what to pack and I especially appreciated the warnings about electronics:

“You won’t have a lot of space to store things, so try to fit everything you need into a standard roll-on bag. Be sure that is well labeled and is lockable as an extra layer of security.

Among the things you should include on your packing checklist:

  • Personal medications, preferably in their original container so that the nurse can find them for you if you are unable to reach them
  • A list of your current medications to add to your hospital chart, including names, dosages, and dosing schedule
  • Comfortable pajamas (loose-fitting is best)
  • A light robe for modesty, especially in a shared room
  • Slippers with rubber soles (to prevent slipping)
  • Plenty of socks and underwear
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, and deodorant
  • Hairbrush or comb
  • Soap, skin care products, and hair care products if you prefer your own (ideally travel size)
  • Special needs products like tampons, sanitary pads, or denture cream
  • Glasses (which may be easier than contacts if you think you’ll be dozing a lot)
  • Outfit to wear home (something loose is best, also make sure it won’t rub on your incision)
  • A cell phone charger for your cell phone
  • Your laptop charger if you intend to bring one
  • Earplugs if you are ​a light sleeper
  • An eyemask if you are used to black-out curtains
  • Entertainment such as books, a portable DVD player, puzzles, or magazines
  • Earbuds or earphones for your P3 or DVD player
  • Non-perishable snacks, especially if you have dietary concerns (such as diabetes or chronic medications that need to be taken with high-fat foods)”

One quick call to the hospital to see if they have any additions to make to these lists and I’m ready to pack. How about you?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!