I Can’t Eat That 

Now that I’m cancer free, I’ve resumed visits to all the other specialists (Isn’t growing older wonderful?) I had been seeing before the cancer diagnosis. One of these specialists was my immunologist, who had suggested I stop taking my allergy injections while I was doing chemotherapy since the chemo would change many of the conditions in my body. She was right. I no longer need the monthly injections for seasonal allergies, but there are certain foods I can no longer eat.

Why not, you may be asking yourself. Easy answer? I’m allergic to them. Wait just a minute here. What exactly does allergic mean and how will this affect your Chronic Kidney Disease?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/allergy tells us that allergy means,

“1altered bodily reactivity (such as hypersensitivity) to an antigen in response to a first exposure….

2exaggerated or pathological immunological reaction (as by sneezing, difficult breathing, itching, or skin rashes) to substances, situations, or physical states that are without comparable effect on the average individual

3medical practice concerned with allergies

4a feeling of antipathy or aversion”

It’s definition number two for us. Maybe an explanation of those monthly allergy injections would be helpful here, too. The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/allergy-shots/about/pac-20392876#:~:text=If%20you%20get%20weekly%20or,reaction%2C%20particularly%20a%20local%20reaction had the explanation we needed:

“Allergy shots are regular injections over a period of time — generally around three to five years — to stop or reduce allergy attacks. Allergy shots are a form of treatment called immunotherapy. [Gail here: Hence, the specialist who treats allergies is called an immunologist.] Each allergy shot contains a tiny amount of the specific substance or substances that trigger your allergic reactions. These are called allergens. Allergy shots contain just enough allergens to stimulate your immune system — but not enough to cause a full-blown allergic reaction.

Over time, your doctor increases the dose of allergens in each of your allergy shots. This helps get your body used to the allergens (desensitization). Your immune system builds up a tolerance to the allergens, causing your allergy symptoms to diminish over time.”

Lucky me: no more seasonal allergies. Let’s get back to those food allergies and CKD now… or not. While I found quite a bit of information about drug allergies, I found very little about food allergies. It’s nice to know my allergies to shellfish and vanilla will not harm my kidneys. Come to think of it, I don’t eat these foods because I’m allergic to them, so they’re not in my system anyway.

Hmmm, is it any different with food sensitivities? How’s about a definition first. It’s so nice to have a favorite dictionary. This is what The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sensitivity?utm_campaign=sd&utm_medium=serp&utm_source=jsonld has to say:

“the quality or state of being sensitive: such as

athe capacity of an organism or sense organ to respond to stimulation: IRRITABILITY

bthe quality or state of being hypersensitive

cthe degree to which a radio receiving set responds to incoming waves

dthe capacity of being easily hurt

eawareness of the needs and emotions of others”

Definition a is the one we need.

Again, I did not find enough validation that food sensitivities could damage our kidneys to write about it.

Maybe I’m looking at this backwards. Maybe it’s not do food sensitivities and allergies damage our kidneys that I should be dealing with, but rather can they cause kidney damage. Back to the internet. Will you look at that? Again, there was much more information about drug allergies damaging your kidneys and very little about food allergies or sensitivities.

I’ve satisfied myself that, just as with my food allergies, my sensitivity to lactose, wheat, fructose syrup, and acidic foods will not harm my kidneys. Although, they may cause me to read more food labels than I usually do. Hopefully, you’re satisfied that your food allergies and sensitivities will not harm your kidneys. If you’re still concerned, speak with your nephrologist or renal dietitian.

Of course, none of this means we can ignore the kidney diet. That is, not if you want to slow down the progression of the decline of your kidney function. Eat according to your labs. Keep watching your potassium, phosphorous, protein, and sodium restrictions. This is highly individualized, so again: speak with your nephrologist or renal dietitian should you have questions.

While we’re on the subject of food, do you remember when I wrote about Flavis? That’s the low sodium, low phosphorus, low potassium food company. Bear made a beef stew which we decided to eat upon a layer of pasta. We chose Flavis’s fusilli. That’s a kind of short, spiral pasta. I have got to say it was delicious. I like that it tastes so light, especially since I usually find pasta so heavy.   

News! I’ve gotten so many emails asking where readers can buy my books that I’ve made each title clickable. Click on the title and you go directly to the book’s page on Amazon.com. The titles are to the right of the blog itself on the blog roll.

I know, especially now in the time of Covid-19, that money can be an issue and even the $2.99 for the digital version of each of the books can be $2.99 too much. In that case, I suggest you request your library order the book and then you can borrow it for free. Even libraries that have shut down have virtual sites now. I do humbly request reviews from those of you who read the books. You can leave them on the Amazon.com page for each book. Thank you in advance.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!