And Then There Are Bhutan and India

There’s a fellow on Facebook whose name caught my eye. A little background first. My older daughter is called.Nima, That’s a Tibetan name which means ‘the sun.’ Since my children’s father was studying Tibetan psychology at the time, we were going to name our second child Tashi. That means ‘good fortune.’

After some heart searching talks, we decided this child would be not only our second, but our last. It is a tradition in my Jewish religion to name a child after honored, deceased members of the family. There were still beloved people to be honored, so Tashi was voted out. Yet, I have always liked the name.

Now that you know why I like the name, you’re probably asking yourself what this has to do with Bhutan. That’s where the follow on Facebook whose name caught my eye lives and – surprise – he is a Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Advocate. We don’t have regular contact with each other, but I do read the posts on his Facebook Tashi Namgay Kidney page.

Now I’ll bet you want to know just where Bhutan is. As you can see from the map, it’s in Southeast Asia and is surrounded by India except for the northern border which is shared by China.
This small country has an active CKD community. The Bhutan Kidney Foundation was Tashi’s baby. He was persistent about instituting this foundation in Bhutan and finally succeeded in 2012.

This is from their website at http://www.bhutankidneyfoundation.org/

OBJECTIVES:
• To promote overall well-being of kidney patients in Bhutan.
• To raise awareness among general public on kidney related diseases in coordination with relevant agencies and stakeholders.
• To ensure all kidney patients have easy access to affordable care and services.
• To raise funds and facilitate underprivileged and needy patients to undergo transplant even though RGoB currently bears the entire medical costs besides other financial assistance.
• To support establishment of renal and other organ transplantation programmes in Bhutan in near future.
• To encourage, promote and facilitate legal organ donations.
• To provide necessary support and services to other organ-related patients as well.
• To explore international funds amongst health supporting organizations around the globe for the purposes of carrying out research on causes of rampant kidney failures in Bhutan so that in near future, the disease may be contained.

They also have a Facebook page with the same name. As a matter of fact, I mentioned that page just recently in the June 12th blog, although I didn’t realize at that time that Tashi was the prime mover behind the Bhutan Kidney Foundation.

According to World Life Expectancy at http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/country-health-profile/bhutan, Bhutan ranks 46th in the world for deaths due to kidney disease. That equates to a little less than 19 deaths per 100,000 people as of 2014. Bhutan’s population was only approximately 765,000 people at that time.With the rise in CKD in Bhutan, Tashi’s work to education the citizens about the disease is much needed.

What about India? Does they also promote CKD Awareness? Indeed, so much so that Subash Singh invited me to post the blog on his Mani Trust Facebook page. Mani Trust deals with all kinds of help for the people living in India, not just CKD. There are food initiatives, clean-ups, any kind of humanitarian undertaking they can think of.

I, of course, am only going to deal with CKD in India. According to MedIndia.net – one of the first health websites in India and one I’ve used before – at http://www.medindia.net/health_statistics/health_facts/kidney-facts.htm,

“There are approximately 7.85 million people suffering from chronic kidney failure in India…. In India 90% patients who suffer from kidney disease are not able to afford the cost of treatment.”

Reminder, it was an Indian doctor who was responsible for this blog’s existence. When What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney was published, he contacted me wanting the information for his patients who were so poor they could rarely afford the bus fare to the clinic. The book became the first blog posts.

Now I wish now that I had saved his email and his name. But who knew six years ago that SlowItDownCKD would be winning kidney health blog awards and be the source of six more CKD books?

Back to CKD activity in India. Oh my! India ranks a whopping 24th in the world for kidney related deaths. That was almost 22 people per 100,000 in 2014. At that time, India’s population was 1,271,702,542. For comparison, the population of the U.S. for the same year was 325,120,000.

This is from BioMedCentral at http://bmcnephrol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2369-13-10. Due to space constraints, I have not reproduced the entire chart. By the way,  BioMedCentral is the home to BMC Nephrology, which is an open access journal.

The number of cases reported from each zone (me here: of India) in the different years

Year
2006            13,231
2007            11,196
2008            11,644
2009            10,188
2010*            6,388

*Till Sep 30, 2010

Apparently, most of the CKD in India is caused by diabetic nephropathy. I turned to my old favorite WebMD for a definition. This one is at http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/tc/diabetic-nephropathy-topic-overview#1.

Nephropathy means kidney disease or damage. Diabetic nephropathy is damage to your kidneys caused by diabetes. In severe cases it can lead to kidney failure. But not everyone with diabetes has kidney damage.

Healthline, a well-respected health information site, at http://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/diabetic-neuropathy#types3 tells us:

Diabetic neuropathy is caused by high blood sugar levels sustained over a long period of time. Other factors can lead to nerve damage, such as:

• damage to the blood vessels, such as damage done by high cholesterol levels
• mechanical injury, such as injuries caused by carpal tunnel syndrome
• lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use

Low levels of vitamin B-12 can also lead to neuropathy. Metformin (Glucophage), a common medicine used to manage the symptoms of diabetes, can cause lower levels of vitamin B-12.

So much to digest, umm, I mean understand.

It seems to me that while CKD is burgeoning world wide (although as we see in the chart, come countries are lowering the incidence of the disease), but so is CKD awareness… and that gives me hope. I haven’t written about them here, but the European countries each have their own kidney organizations. I remember writing about some of the Caribbean and African countries. If there’s a particular country that interests you which I haven’t covered, leave me a comment.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

Here, There, and Everywhere

I was thinking about the AAKP Annual National Meeting coming up in September. You see, I’ve never been to one. Years ago, when I first started writing about Chronic Kidney Disease a reader asked if I’d be there. I was almost a decade younger then and had lots on my plate: teaching college classes, acting, writing, being an active mother, and getting used to my new diagnose. I had no time to run off to meet a bunch of people with the same disease. I didn’t even know anyone there!

Yep, things have changed for me. I’ve retired from both education and acting as of 2013, my children are out of the house although we still have almost daily contact, and I’m better at dealing with CKD. So I’m going. I thought you might like to know something about this group since it was started by patients for patients.

AAKP is the acronym for the American Association of Kidney Patients. I am flabbergasted that six patients in Brooklyn, New York, started this group in 1969 while they were undergoing dialysis and that today AAKP reaches one million people at all stages of kidney disease. I’m a member as of last week. Did I mention that membership is free? This year’s meeting will be in St. Petersburg, Florida from September 8th to the 10th.

I also shied away because I thought they’d have nothing to offer me since I’m stage 3 and the association was started by dialysis patients. I was wrong. Some of the General Sessions deal with national policy and kidney disease, innovations in kidney disease care, patient centered kidney disease care, and the kidney friendly diet. This is not all of them, just the ones I’m interested in.

The smaller Breakout Sessions that might interest others in the early or moderate stages of CKD are social media, dental health, clinical trials, staying active, veterans’ health, lab values, and vaccinations. But that’s not all: there’s even lunch with the experts on the first two days. The topics range from transplant, caregiver, advocacy, cooking, and support groups to acute kidney injury. I mentioned those areas that interest me, but there’s more, far more.

Before I start to sound like I’m selling you a product, here’s their web site so you can explore this association and national meeting for yourself: https://aakp.org.

Let’s say you don’t want to travel. How else can you partake of the kidney patient world, the part of it that doesn’t deal with going to the nephrologist or renal dietician? Well, have you heard of Renal Support Network at http://www.rsnhope.org/? Lori Hartwell has had kidney disease since she was two years old and wanted to instill hope in those with the disease. Now you understand the URL. There are also podcasts about kidney disease at http://www.rsnhope.org/kidneytalk-podcast/ or you can go through the menu on their home page.

Here’s something you can do to help other kidney patients and maybe, just maybe, see your work in print.

Calling all Storytellers who have kidney disease, Share your Experience!

Enter RSN’s 15th Annual Essay Contest.
This year’s theme is “Describe a positive decision that you have made about your healthcare.”
First Prize: $500, Second Prize: $300, Third Prize: $100
Winning essays will be published on RSNhope.org and in Live&Give newsletter

Lori was especially helpful to me when I was first starting out in CKD awareness advocacy. I think you’ll find something of interest to you on her website, although I’ll bet it won’t be the same something for any two people. What I especially like is the Health Library with articles on varied subjects.

Further afield, The Bhutan Kidney Foundation is doing an Amazonian job of spreading kidney disease awareness. I am constantly reading about their walks and educational meetings, as well as governmental initiatives. I think they may even have a Facebook page. Let me go check. Hi again. I’m back and they do.

Have you heard of Mani Trust? This is an India based group that strives to provide humanitarian help to individuals and their country, including those suffering from kidney disease. We know this is not a Western-part-of-the-world-only problem, but I wonder if we realize just how widespread it is.

Remember I told you about the CKD awareness presentation I offered at a global conference several weeks ago? I found astounding facts from World Life Expectancy at http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com. One of the most striking facts I included in that presentation is that globally 864,226 people  died of kidney disease last year. That makes kidney disease number 15 in the cause of death hit parade.

In Malaysia, there were 2,768 deaths due to kidney disease, over 2% of the country’s total population. In Albania, there were 443, that’s also close to 2% of the country’s total population. Ghana had 2,469 deaths, which is 1.3%.  Egypt? 15,820, which is almost 3½ %. Here in the United States, there were 59,186 deaths, which is almost 3% of our population. What’s my point?

Kidney disease is a global problem. I don’t know what I can do to help in other countries in other parts of the world, but I do know what I can do to help here… and what you can do to help here. If you’re able to, attend the national meetings and local conferences about kidney disease and spread whatever new information you’ve learned. If you are unable to travel, keep your eye on the Facebook kidney disease pages which often have files and delve into them. Share this information, too. If you don’t travel and you’re not on a computer, register for mailing lists and share information from them, too. Of course, check everything you read with your nephrologist before you share and use the advice yourself.

 

You’ll find a blog roll – a list of kidney care and awareness organizations – on the right side of my blog. Why not explore some of these and see which ones appeal to you? If you like them, you’ll read them. And, hopefully, if you read them, you’ll share the information. According to the latest CDC findings, more than one out of every seven people in the United States has CKD. Let’s try to change those figures. By the way, you can read more about this at https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/kidney_factsheet.pdf.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!