You Think It’s All in Your Head?

As I was sitting in my allergist’s office last week, I started to wonder if Chronic Kidney Disease had anything to do with my runny nose. I’d thought it was the usual seasonal allergies, but over the last dozen years or so I’ve learned that almost every malady I experience has some kind of relation to my kidneys…  so why not the runny nose? 

The American Kidney Fund at https://bit.ly/3kvpjb9 explains for us: 

“Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, is a disease that causes swelling and irritation of blood vessels in the kidneys, nose, sinuses, throat and lungs. Swollen blood vessels make it harder for blood to get to the organs and tissues that need it, which can be harmful. The disease also causes lumps called granulomas to form and damage the area around them. In some people GPA only affects the lungs. GPA that affects the kidneys can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.” 

Whoa! Not good. Let’s see how it’s treated. The Cleveland Clinic at https://cle.clinic/3mjudss tells us, 

“People with GPA who have critical organ system involvement are generally treated with corticosteroids [Gail here: commonly just called steroids] combined with another immunosuppressive medication such as cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan ®) or rituximab (Rituxan®). In patients who have less severe GPA, corticosteroids and methotrexate can be used initially. The goal of treatment is to stop all injury that is occurring as a result of GPA. If disease activity can be completely ‘turned off,’ this is called ‘remission.’ Once it is apparent that the disease is improving, doctors slowly reduce the corticosteroid dose and eventually hope to discontinue it completely. When cyclophosphamide is used, it is only given until the time of remission (usually around 3 to 6 months), after which time it is switched to another immunosuppressive agent, such as methotrexate, azathioprine (Imuran®), or mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept®) to maintain remission. The treatment duration of the maintenance immunosuppressive medication may vary between individuals. In most instances, it is given for a minimum of 2 years before consideration is given to slowly reduce the dose toward discontinuation.” 

If this sounds familiar, you’re right. It’s straight out of this year’s May 25th blog. Aha! Now we see the value of using the category drop down to the right of the blog. 

Anyway, while this is interesting (to me, at least), it’s not answering my question: Can CKD cause sinus problems. What was that? You want to know what a runny nose has to do with your sinuses? Let’s find out.  

I returned to the ever-reliable Cleveland Clinic, this time at https://cle.clinic/2FXOm7Q,  for some information: 

“Sinusitis is an inflammation, or swelling, of the tissue lining the sinuses. The sinuses are four paired cavities (spaces) in the head. They are connected by narrow channels. The sinuses make thin mucus that drains out of the channels of the nose. This drainage helps keep the nose clean and free of bacteria. Normally filled with air, the sinuses can get blocked and filled with fluid. When that happens, bacteria can grow and cause an infection (bacterial sinusitis). 

This is also called rhinosinusitis, with ‘rhino’ meaning ‘nose.’ The nasal tissue is almost always swollen if sinus tissue is inflamed.” 

It seems that you need a runny nose to avoid sinusitis. Is that right? I don’t think so, and neither does MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/sinusitis/article.htm.  

“Sinusitis signs and symptoms include 

sinus headache, 

facial tenderness, 

pressure or pain in the sinuses, in the ears and teeth, 

fever, 

cloudy discolored nasal or postnasal drainage, [I bolded this symptom.] 

feeling of nasal stuffiness, 

sore throat, 

cough, and 

occasionally facial swelling.” 

So, now it seems that a runny nose can be a symptom of sinusitis. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

And how does that fit in with having CKD? Before we answer that, I think we need to straighten out the differences between allergy and cold symptoms since both conditions may cause sinusitis. 

“The symptoms of allergies and sinusitis overlap a lot. Both can give you a stuffy nose. If it’s allergies, you may also have: 

Runny nose and sneezing 

Watery or itchy eyes 

Wheezing 

If it’s sinusitis, besides a stuffy nose, you may have: 

Thick, colored mucus 

Painful, swollen feeling around your forehead, eyes, and cheeks 

Headache or pain in your teeth 

Post-nasal drip (mucus that moves from the back of your nose into your throat) 

Bad breath 

Cough and sore throat 

Fatigue 

Light fever” 

Thank you to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/allergies/sinusitis-or-allergies for the list above.  

 On to my original question. This is from Vick’s at https://vicks.com/en-us/treatments/how-to-treat-a-cold/how-to-stop-a-runny-nose. (Who better to go to than a trusted friend since childhood?)  

“A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. A runny nose is a discharge of mucus from the nostrils. It’s the result of excess nasal mucus production. The excess nasal mucus leads to watery nasal secretions that flow out of your nostrils or drip down into your throat. Nasal congestion is due to the inflammation of the linings of the nasal cavity.” 

Did you notice the word “inflammation” in the last sentence? Ahem, an article by Oleh M Akchurin of Weill Cornell Medical College and Frederick J Kaskel of Albert Einstein College of Medicine published by ResearchGate at https://bit.ly/3jtVzKL states: 

“Chronic inflammation should be regarded as a common comorbid condition in CKD and especially in dialysis patients.”   

And there you have it. Your (and my) runny nose can be caused – in part – from having CKD. Inflammation is the name of the game if you have Chronic Kidney Disease. 

Although, in these times, I wonder if Covid-19 might somehow be involved in certain cases. Just remember, I’m not a doctor and never claimed to be one, so this just might be a question for your medical provider. 

Until next week, 

Keep living your life! (Safely: mask up, wash up, social distance) 
 

The Other Side of the Coin

Here’s hoping everyone had a wonderful Father’s Day. During our relaxed celebration for Bear, I found myself ruminating about how many times we’ve celebrated this holiday for fathers no longer with us and how many more times  we would be able to celebrate it for the fathers who are. They are aging. Wait a minute, that means their kidneys are aging, too.

Yep, that meant a new blog topic. We already know that kidney function declines with age. According to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/blog/ask-doctor/what-age-do-kidneys-decline-function, “The general ‘Rule of Thumb’ is that kidney function begins to decline at age 40 and declines at a rate of about 1% per year beyond age forty. Rates may differ in different individuals.” 40?

Well, what is a perfect kidney function score… if such exists? Back  to the NKF, although they call this a ‘normal’ not ‘perfect’ GFR, this time at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/gfr:

In adults, the normal GFR number is more than 90. GFR declines with age, even in people without kidney disease.
Average estimated GFR
20–29     116
30–39     107
40–49     99
50–59     93
60–69     85
70+         75

Got it. So even for a normal 70+ person, I have CKD with my 50ish GFR.

It seems I’m getting a bit ahead of myself here. I haven’t defined GFR yet. Let’s take a gander at What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for that definition,

“Glomerular filtration rate [if there is a lower case “e” before the term, it means estimated glomerular filtration rate] which determines both the stage of kidney disease and how well the kidneys are functioning.”

No, that won’t do. I think we need more of an explanation. This is from SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through  the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Many thanks to MedlinePlus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007305.htm for the definition.”

Okay, I think that’s clear now. However, that’s not what I wanted to know. This is – if kidney function already declines with age, does having CKD age us more quickly?

Premature aging is a process associated with a progressive accumulation of deleterious changes over time, an impairment of physiologic functions, and an increase in the risk of disease and death. Regardless of genetic background, aging can be accelerated by the lifestyle choices and environmental conditions to which our genes are exposed. Chronic kidney disease is a common condition that promotes cellular senescence and premature aging through toxic alterations in the internal milieu. This occurs through several mechanisms, including DNA and mitochondria damage, increased reactive oxygen species generation, persistent inflammation, stem cell exhaustion, phosphate toxicity, decreased klotho expression, and telomere attrition….”

You can read the entire fascinating (to my way of thinking) American Journal of Kidney Disease article at http://www.natap.org/2013/HIV/PIIS0272638612015922.pdf.

Nature.com at http://www.nature.com/nrneph/journal/v10/n12/full/nrneph.2014.185.html seems to agree that CKD accelerates aging:

“Chronic kidney disease (CKD) shares many phenotypic similarities with other chronic diseases, including heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV infection and rheumatoid arthritis. The most apparent similarity is premature ageing, involving accelerated vascular disease and muscle wasting. We propose that in addition to a sedentary lifestyle and psychosocial and socioeconomic determinants, four major disease-induced mechanisms underlie premature ageing in CKD: an increase in allostatic load, activation of the ‘stress resistance response’, activation of age-promoting mechanisms and impairment of anti-ageing pathways. The most effective current interventions to modulate premature ageing—treatment of the underlying disease, optimal nutrition, correction of the internal environment and exercise training—reduce systemic inflammation and oxidative stress and induce muscle anabolism. Deeper mechanistic insight into the phenomena of premature ageing as well as early diagnosis of CKD might improve the application and efficacy of these interventions and provide novel leads to combat muscle wasting and vascular impairment in chronic diseases.”

Remember the friend of my daughter’s who hadn’t seen me in five years who (thought) he whispered to her, “Your mom got so old.” Now I understand why, although I have noticed this myself. I look in the mirror and see the bags under my eyes that are not errant eye liner. I see the lines in my faces, especially around my mouth, that weren’t there just a year ago. I see the stubborn fat around my middle that frustrates me no end. I see that it takes me forever (okay, so I’m being figurative here, folks) to recover from the flu, and I see how easily I become – and stay – tired. The dancer in me screams, “No fair!” The adult patient in me says, “Deal with it,” so I do.

I’ve used quite a bit of advanced terminology today, but haven’t explained a great deal of it in the hopes that when you read these articles their meanings will become clear in context. If they don’t, please leave me a comment and I will explore each one of them in future blogs. Who knows? Maybe I’ll need to devote an entire blog to whichever term it is you’d like to know more about.

Don’t let our premature aging get you down. We can work against it and, hopefully, slow it down just as we do with the progress of the decline in our kidney function.

I have been saving this bit of news for the last item in today’s blog. The world is not going to suffer if it doesn’t know about my photography, my teaching ,writing, or acting careers. But, when it comes to CKD, my writing can add something for those 31 million people who have it…especially the 90% that haven’t been diagnosed yet. What I did was completely change my web site so that it deals only with my Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Advocacy (It’s all caps because that’s the way I think of it.) under the umbrella of SlowItDownCKD. I have to admit, I was surprised to see how active I’ve been in the last decade. It’s different when you see your work listed all in one place. Take a look at www.gail-raegarwood.com and tell me what you think, would you?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!