But Why?

As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we all know that proteinuria is one indication of our disease. Would you like a reminder about what proteinuria is? Here’s one from The American Kidney Fund at http://www.kidneyfund.org/kidney-disease/kidney-problems/protein-in-urine.html:

“Healthy kidneys remove extra fluid and waste from your blood, but let proteins and other important nutrients pass through and return to your blood stream. When your kidneys are not working as well as they should, they can let some protein (albumin) escape through their filters, into your urine. When you have protein in your urine, it is called proteinuria (or albuminuria). Having protein in your urine can be a sign of nephrotic syndrome, or an early sign of kidney disease.”

I used to think that’s all it was: an indicator of CKD. That is until my occupational therapist and I got to talking about the edema caused by neuropathy.

Ah! Flash! We did also talk about Havimat which I wrote about last week and I checked on a number of sites to see if it were safe for an active tumor. The consensus of the sites agreed it was safe to use on someone with an active tumor that was being treated as long as it was not used on the location of the tumor itself. I feel better now about having had three sessions with Havimat since the occupational therapist was careful not to use it anywhere near my pancreas – the site of the tumor.

But I digress. Back to the topic at hand: proteinuria. It seems that protein is needed in the body, rather than being excreted in the urine. You guessed it. My question became the topic of today’s blog: But Why?

According to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/men/features/benefits-protein#1:

“Protein is an important component of every cell in the body. Hair and nails are mostly made of protein. Your body uses protein to build and repair tissues. You also use protein to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals. Protein is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood.”

Okay, got it that protein is very necessary but what does that have to do with the chemotherapy I had that seemed to cause the proteinuria problem?  After looking at bunches of different sites (Today’s blog is taking a very long time to write.), I gleaned a little hint here and a little hint there until I figured out that certain types of chemotherapy may make proteinuria worse if you already have it, or cause it. Boo for me; I lost on that one since I already had proteinuria.

Well, what about the edema from the neuropathy? Was proteinuria affecting that in some way? Or did I have it backwards and it was the neuropathy that was causing the edema. I went to eMedicineHealth at https://www.emedicinehealth.com/neuropathy/article_em.htm#what_is_neuropathy for some help with this.

“Certain drugs and medications can cause nerve damage. Examples include cancer therapy drugs such as vincristine(Oncovin, Vincasar), and antibiotics such as metronidazole (Flagyl), and isoniazid (Nydrazid, Laniazid).”

This little tidbit is from MedicalNewsToday at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323481.php :

“Chemotherapy can damage nerves that affect feeling and movement in the hands and feet. Doctors call this condition chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Symptoms can be severe and may affect a person’s quality of life.”

By the way, diabetic neuropathy is another form of peripheral neuropathy.

Uh-oh, now what do I do? The HonorHealth Research Institute in Scottsdale, Arizona, where I’m being treated offered both the gabapentin for the pain (which I skipped since I want to try non-drug treatment first) and occupational therapy. Let’s see what that might do for me. Please note that occupational therapy works at reducing the pain of the neuropathy.

I have a bag of toys. Each has a different sensory delivery on my hands and feet. For example, there’s a woven metal ring that I run up and down my fingers and toes, then up my arms and legs. I do the same with most of the other toys: a ball with netting over it, another with rubber strings hanging from it. I also have a box of uncooked rice to rub my feet and hands in… and lots of other toys. The idea is to desensitize my hands and feet.

I was also given physical exercises to do, like raising my fisted hands above my head and straightening out my fist several times.  This is one of many exercises. Do you remember the old TV show, E.R? It takes me slightly longer than one 43 minute episode to complete the exercises.

When I go to see the therapist, she uses the Havimat (electrical stimulation), another machine that sucks the chemo out (no kidding… and it doesn’t hurt either.), and a third that pulses. I am amazed at how the edema disappears when she uses these. But, unfortunately, the effect doesn’t stay very long. Compression socks have helped and, despite their not-so-pleasing appearance are quite comfortable.

Wow! Proteinuria is so much more than just an indication that you may have Chronic Kidney Disease.

Ready for a topic change? The following is part of an email I received from KDIGO (Kidney Disease – Improving Global Outcomes).

“We … invite your comments at any time.  Suggest topics, look for opportunities for KDIGO to implement its work in your area, bring new ideas to us, and help us become more relevant to the lives of patients like you. As a global organization, we seek to continue to develop communication channels to patients throughout the world.  This is difficult to do from one perspective, but if we work together we can build a robust base of individuals and ideas that will help us plan and carry out our mission.

KDIGO doesn’t have any members or local entities to whom we are accountable.  We only are accountable to you, our patients.  Outcomes of your care are our mission.  We can do it better if you work with us and give us your constructive input.

Again, thanks for letting us know you’d like to be a part of this global effort.  Your ideas are welcome and will be taken into account. “

Keep those comments coming, folks. Their email is kdigocommunications@kdigo.org.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Rising to the Challenge

Remember Loyal Reader from a few years ago? He and I are still in touch and toss around ideas here and there. He sent me an article about Chronic Kidney Disease patients being at higher risk for Hepatitis C along with the comment, “Hmmm, I wonder why?” I know a challenge when I see one, so let’s find out.

Back to basics: what is Hepatitis C anyway? As I mentioned in SlowItDownCKD 2013, Hepatitis is from the … Greek word root, hepa, which means liver.” Interesting, but not enough information for our purposes.

According to our old friend the MayoClinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hepatitis-c/symptoms-causes/syc-20354278,

“Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated blood.”

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/sites/default/files/HepC_Infographic.pdf explained why hepatitis C is associated with Chronic Kidney Disease:

“Hepatitis C infection is strongly associated with kidney disease. Hepatitis C is more common in people with kidney disease than the general population. Hepatitis C can be a cause of kidney disease, or make existing kidney disease worse. People receiving a kidney transplant, or donating a kidney, are routinely tested for hepatitis C.

Hemodialysis and Hepatitis C People receiving long-term hemodialysis have a risk of getting hepatitis C through transmission in the dialysis clinic. The risk is small because of strict standard health precautions used in dialysis units today. However, some cases of hepatitis C being spread between patients have been reported.”

By the way, NKF uses infographs which are easy to understand.

In SlowItDownCKD 2017, I explained what KDIGO is. We’re going to need that explanation in just a moment.

“This stands for KIDNEY DISEASE | IMPROVING GLOBAL OUTCOMES. Their homepage at KDIGO.org states, “KDIGO MISSION – Improving the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through the development and implementation of global clinical practice guidelines.”

Here’s where KDIGO comes in. Way back in 2008, the following was published in the April issue of the official journal of the International Society of Nephrology, Kidney International, which supports the KDIGO:

“‘HCV infection is associated with an increased prevalence of reduced kidney function, albuminuria, and an increased risk of developing end stage renal disease,’ says Dr. Jaber, who is also vice chair for clinical affairs, Department of Medicine at Caritas St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, ‘HCV infection is also associated with increased mortality among patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis and among kidney transplant recipients.'”

But, in 2018, KDIGO updated their recommendations: “We recommend screening all patients for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection at the time of initial evaluation of chronic kidney disease (CKD).”

Hmmm, as Loyal Reader would say, I wonder if this has something to do with the albuminuria Dr. Jaber mentioned in 2008.

Let’s see what we can find out. I found this in SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“Albumin is a protein.  It will show up as microalbumin in your urine test.  It may also show up as proteinuria since albumin is a protein.”

We can figure out that microalbumin is extremely small particles of albumin, but what about proteinuria? I went back, back, back to my first CKD book, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for the definition:

“Protein in the urine, not a normal state of being.”

Does anyone else feel like we’re going down the rabbit hole here? Of course it’s not normal! It means we have CKD. Now, if there’s any amount   of protein in our urine… and there may be since we do have Chronic Kidney Disease… it looks like Hepatitis C Virus can raise that amount and lower our GFR. Not good, not good at all.

So what do we do about it? WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/digestive-diseases-hepatitis-c#2 held the least medicalese answer about the drugs that all the sites I viewed saw as the best treatment plan:

“Your treatment will depend on many things including what type of hepatitis C virus you have. In the U.S., the most common type is genotype 1, followed by genotypes 2 and 3. Genotypes 4, 5, and 6 are very rare in the U.S. Your doctor will help you figure out what’s right for you, based on your medical needs and insurance coverage. “

I know. I had the same question. What is a genotype? Hello, Dictionary.com, my old friend, at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/genotype.

“the genetic makeup of an organism or group of organisms with reference to a single trait, set of traits, or an entire complex of traits.”

Well, that makes sense. Just one more thing, though. Is it possible to know we have Hepatitis C before we’re diagnosed with CKD – at which time we should be tested for HCV – or even if we don’t have CKD? That is a loaded question. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), fully 80% of those with acute or short term HCV won’t have any symbols. The other 20% may experience mild symptoms you might experience with any illness: fever, joint pain, being tired and/or nauseous, and the like. However with chronic or long term HCV, you might experience dark urine and/or jaundice of the skin and eyeballs. To complicate matters even more, there are three different kinds of hepatitis. You can read much more about hepatitis at https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/cfaq.htm

There’s one thing that I haven’t yet made clear. Your body rids itself of wastes and excess fluids through either the kidneys or the liver. If you have CKD, your kidneys are already not functioning as well as they should which means you’re not getting rid of either wastes or excess fluids efficiently. Guess what. One of the functions of the liver is to also clean your blood. Having two organs that are not effectively cleansing your blood is not a position you want to be in… ever.

This was a difficult blog to write. There were so many little pieces to link together. But thanks for the challenge, Loyal Reader, I learned a lot.

Switching topics now. Since the weather has been,uh, difficult lately (to say the least), I thought this might be helpful.  Use this link rather than clicking below: https://ecs.page.link/SVpB 

Until next week,

 

Keep living your life!