D’immunity

I can just see your faces now. Huh? What is that? The concept makes sense, but the word doesn’t. Do you remember my mentioning that one of the joys of being a writer is that you make up words? Well, that’s one I made up right after my doctor talked with me about vitamin D and immunity. He was talking about warding off a reoccurrence of cancer, but when I started researching I found that it has to do with all immunity.

Wait a minute. Just as I keep reminding you that I’m not a doctor and never claimed to be one, it’s important you realize that when I use the word ‘research,’ I mean searching the web and whatever journals or texts I have available. I am not a researcher in the true sense of the word. My favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/research can help us out here:

1: careful or diligent search

2: studious inquiry or examination especially investigation or experimentation aimed at the discovery and interpretation of facts, revision of accepted theories or laws in the light of new facts, or practical application of such new or revised theories or laws

3: the collecting of information about a particular subject”

(‘Er’ is a suffix that means ‘one who,’ so a researcher is one who researches.) Most of us think of a researcher as the second definition. I think of myself as the third definition.

Okay, now that’s cleared up let’s get back to the miraculous vitamin D and your immunity. ScienceDaily at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190417111440.htm tells us,

“The University of Edinburgh team focused on how vitamin D affects a mechanism in the body’s immune system — dendritic cells’ ability to activate T cells.

In healthy people, T cells play a crucial role in helping to fight infections. In people with autoimmune diseases, however, they can start to attack the body’s own tissues.

By studying cells from mice and people, the researchers found vitamin D caused dendritic cells to produce more of a molecule called CD31 on their surface and that this hindered the activation of T cells.

The team observed how CD31 prevented the two cell types from making a stable contact — an essential part of the activation process — and the resulting immune reaction was far reduced.

Researchers say the findings shed light on how vitamin D deficiency may regulate the immune system and influence susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.

The study, published in Frontiers in Immunology, was funded by the Medical Research Council, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Natural Environment Research Council and Wellcome.”

If you’re like me, you’ll need help with some of these terms.

Dendritic cells are:

“a branching cell of the lymph nodes, blood, and spleen that functions as a network trapping foreign protein,”

according to Dictionary.com at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/dendritic-cell.

Let’s take a look at T cells now. I was comfortable with MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=11300’s definition:

“T cell: A type of white blood cell that is of key importance to the immune system and is at the core of adaptive immunity, the system that tailors the body’s immune response to specific pathogens. The T cells are like soldiers who search out and destroy the targeted invaders.

Immature T cells (termed T-stem cells) migrate to the thymus gland in the neck, where they mature and differentiate into various types of mature T cells and become active in the immune system in response to a hormone called thymosin and other factors. T-cells that are potentially activated against the body’s own tissues are normally killed or changed (“down-regulated”) during this maturational process.”

I’m sure my doctor had been telling me about this during the course of my treatment, but last week – now that I’ve been declared cancer free – immunity became a big issue to me and I finally listened with both ears. Maybe you should, too, since we’re in the middle of the Corona Virus Pandemic.

Let’s get some more information about vitamin D and your immunity. Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-d-coronavirus#effect-on-immune-health gives us another view of vitamin D and the immune system:

“Vitamin D is necessary for the proper functioning of your immune system, which is your body’s first line of defense against infection and disease.

This vitamin plays a critical role in promoting immune response. It has both anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties and is crucial for the activation of immune system defenses ….

Vitamin D is known to enhance the function of immune cells, including T-cells and macrophages, that protect your body against pathogens….

In fact, the vitamin is so important for immune function that low levels of vitamin D have been associated with an increased susceptibility to infection, disease, and immune-related disorders ….

For example, low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased risk of respiratory diseases, including tuberculosis, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as viral and bacterial respiratory infections….

What’s more, vitamin D deficiency has been linked to decreased lung function, which may affect your body’s ability to fight respiratory infections….”

I caught a word or two in that explanation that we may need defined.

Vocabulary.com at https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/pathogen informs us that a pathogen is,

“… is a tiny living organism, such as a bacterium or virus, that makes people sick. Washing your hands frequently helps you avoid the pathogens that can make you sick.”

How about macrophages? I went to News Medical Life Sciences at for their definition.

“Macrophages are important cells of the immune system that are formed in response to an infection or accumulating damaged or dead cells. Macrophages are large, specialized cells that recognize, engulf and destroy target cells. The term macrophage is formed by the combination of the Greek terms “makro” meaning big and “phagein” meaning eat.”

This must be what my doctor was talking about re cancer.

On another note: I am 73, still undergoing chemotherapy, and have Chronic Kidney Disease. Please be kind to me and others like me by wearing your mask, even if you hate it or think it makes you look weak. You could be saving my life.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!