World Kidney Day, 2019

Will you look at that? The world keeps moving on no matter what’s going on in our personal lives. And so, I recognize that Thursday of this week is World Kidney Day. In honor of this occasion, I’ve chosen to update last year’s World Kidney Day blog… so sit back and enjoy the read.

…World Kidney Day? What’s that? I discovered this is a fairly new designation. It was only thirteen years ago that it was initiated.

 

According to http://worldkidneyday.org,

World Kidney Day is a global awareness campaign aimed at raising awareness of the importance of our kidneys.”

Sound familiar?  That’s where I’m heading with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease; SlowItDownCKD 2011; SlowItDownCKD 2012; SlowItDownCKD 2013; SlowItDownCKD 2014; SlowItDownCKD 2015; SlowItDownCKD 2016; SlowItDownCKD 2017; Facebook; Instagram; LinkedIn; Pinterest; Twitter; and this blog. We may be running along different tracks, but we’re headed in the same direction.

The 59 year old International Society of Nephrology (ISN) – a non-profit group spreading over 155 countries – is one part of the equation for their success.  Another is the International Federation of Kidney Foundations with membership in over 40 countries. Add a steering committee and The World Kidney Day Team and you have the makings of this particular concept….

According to their website at https://www.theisn.org/advocacy/world-kidney-day :

“The mission of World Kidney Day is to raise awareness of the importance of our kidneys to our overall health and to reduce the frequency and impact of kidney disease and its associated health problems worldwide.

Objectives:

  • Raise awareness about our ‘amazing kidneys’
  • Highlight that diabetes and high blood pressure are key risk factors for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)
  • Encourage systematic screening of all patients with diabetes and hypertension for CKD
  • Encourage preventive behaviors
  • Educate all medical professionals about their key role in detecting and reducing the risk of CKD, particularly in high risk populations
  • Stress the important role of local and national health authorities in controlling the CKD epidemic.”

While there are numerous objectives for this year’s World Kidney Day, the one that lays closest to my heart is this one: ‘Encourage systematic screening of all patients with diabetes and hypertension for CKD.’

Back to World Kidney Day’s website at https://www.worldkidneyday.org  now, if you please.

This year’s theme is Kidney Health for Everyone Everywhere.

Their site offers materials and ideas for events as well as a map of global events. Prepare to be awed at how wide spread World Kidney Day events are.

Before you leave their page, take a detour to Kidney FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) on the toolbar at the top of the page.  You can learn everything you need to know from what the kidneys do to what the symptoms (or lack thereof) of CKD are, from how to treat CKD to a toolbox full of helpful education about your kidneys to preventative measures.

If only my nurse practitioner had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, she could have warned me immediately that I needed to make lifestyle changes so the decline of my kidney function could have been slowed down earlier. How much more of my kidney function would I still have if I’d known earlier? That was a dozen years ago. This shouldn’t still be happening… but it is.

I received a phone call a few years ago that just about broke my heart.  Someone very dear to me sobbed, “He’s dying.” When I calmed her down, she explained a parent was sent to a nephrologist who told him he has end stage renal disease and needed dialysis or transplantation immediately.

I pried a little trying to get her to admit he’d been diagnosed before end stage, but she simply didn’t know what I was talking about. There had been no diagnose of Chronic Kidney Disease up to this point. There was diabetes, apparently out of control diabetes, but no one impressed upon this man that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD.

What a waste of the precious time he could have had to do more than stop smoking, which he did (to his credit), the moment he was told it would help with the diabetes.  Would he be where he was then if his medical practitioners had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, especially since this man was high risk due to his age and diabetes?  I fervently believe so.

I have a close friend who was involved in the local senior center where she lives.  She said she didn’t know anyone else but me who had this disease.  Since 1 out of every 7 people does nationally (That’s 15% of the adult population) and being over 60 places you in a high risk group, I wonder how many of her friends were included in the 96% of those in the early stage of CKD who don’t know they have CKD or don’t even know they need to be tested.  I’d have rather been mistaken here, but I’m afraid I wasn’t. National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day could have helped them become aware.

For those of you who have forgotten (Easily read explanations of what results of the different items on your tests mean are in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.), all it takes is a blood test and a urine test to detect CKD.  I have routine blood tests every three months to monitor a medication I’m taking.  It was in this test, a test I took anyway, that my family physician uncovered Chronic Kidney Disease as a problem.

There is so much free education about CKD online. Maybe you can start with the blogroll on the right side of the blog or hit “Apps” on the Topics Dropdown. None of us needs to hear another sorrowful, “If only I had known!”

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Stressed? You Must Be Kidding.

You’re reading this and I’m recovering from my first cataract surgery.  Only one eye is operated on at a time, so the next one is September 4th.  Part of the post operation plan is not driving for a week, which I’m sure I’ll be chaffing at before that week is over.  Another part is reading (and computing) for only ten minutes at a time which is why I’m writing this particular blog a week ahead of time, even though it will be published August 21st.

If you’re following us on Facebook or Twitter, you know I had a cardiovascular scare during my pre-op testing.  While talking to the ever reassuring Dr. Waram at Southwest Desert Cardiology, he mentioned the stellar reviews for What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease on Amazon. That got me to thinking I hadn’t looked at them so months, so I did.  I found two new ones I want to share with you:

5.0 out of 5 stars very helpful for calming down and getting to work on controlJune 23, 2012

By R. Sass

Format:Paperback|Amazon Verified Purchase

This is not a medical book, but it is the ONLY book I could find discussing the issue of early stage CKD. My twenty month old son was diagnosed on thursday, almost in passing by his nephrologist. I did not ask any questions on CKD, I was not handed any pamplets – I went into schock and reacted like I always do to bad news I can not process. I asked questions about my infant son’s high blood pressure (the reason for the appointment). Tried to pay attention, remained calm so as not to upset my children who were with us in the room, and then began to research like crazy. I also went back to the doctor and confirmed that she had in fact diagnosed my son with CKD (stage 1). So for me this book has been very helpful, but again I am still in a schock like state and just want to know how to slow the progression of the disease so that my son can have a mostly normal childhood. Best I can tell there is no treatment for the early stages and at least my son’s nephrologist (who is an expert in the area) does not appear to be at all concerned or worried. So I appreciate this book because it remined me to take the reigns (no one else will or can) and I plan to speak to my son’s pharmacist today about his other daily perscriptions, just to make sure that its okay to take… I plan to get more knowledgeable about nutrition (just like the author did) but most of all I plan to let my son play the sports he loves because activity is so important (the author loves to dance, my son loves to try and ice skate like his big sister).

This book is a very quick read, its almost like you are having a conversation with a friend over coffee. It calmed me down, it gave me direction and it was available on my kindle in seconds. THANK YOU!!!!

5.0 out of 5 stars great down to earth read. May 31, 2012

By HELEN A. VIOLA

Format:Kindle Edition|Amazon Verified Purchase

This book and the author was very informative and so close to my situation that I felt at timess, I wrote it myself. There is so much information included, along with so many web sites to continue my own research. I want to thank this author for her down to earth style of writing!

Back to the cardiovascular scare.  There is no, zero, zilch history of heart disease in my family BUT (as we all know), I do have Chronic Kidney Disease. That moves me up a notch for developing heart problems. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, ckd may be the cause of the following heart and blood vessel complications:

(Diagram  by  Nucleus Medical Art, Inc./Getty Images)

I was worried, but keeping my fear under control thanks to Bear and my good buddy, Joanne Melnick. – one with hugs and kisses, one with common sense (e.g.  Are you in the hospital?  No? Then it’s not an emergency.)

By the way, you can read more about ckd at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001503/

Here’s what happened.  I needed pre-op clearance for the cataract surgery. My trustworthy primary care doctor was unavailable, so her lovely and efficient physician assistant made an appointment for me with the nurse practitioner in the practice.  This woman asked her own physician assistant to perform an EKG on me – twice since she didn’t like the results of the first one.

I didn’t know the np., but was more than a bit disconcerted that she arrived late and had not looked at the notes, did not believe me when I pointed out on the ophthalmologist’s request that I needed an EKG and asked my pcp’s p.a. to verify, and – here’s the worst one – was visibly shaken at the EKG results.  Okay, maybe I was annoyed when I walked in (none of this was taken care of in a timely fashion despite my phone calls so it ended up being a terrific rush), but if anyone should be upset at the results, shouldn’t it be the patient?

The practice provided cardiology recommendations since it was clear seeing one was my next step. I called the closest one hoping they could get me in before my scheduled surgery. Southwest Desert Cardiology’s Brittany had me in the next day.  Their Dr. Kethes C. Waram answered every single one of my numerous questions (Hey, this is me.) and scheduled a stress test for the next day after reading the results of the EKG I’d been given in this office.  Dr. Duong wandered into the examining room while I was there and explained that EKGs can be interpreted from different aspects. While the np. used electrodes on many different parts of my body, the cardiologist concentrated on those areas nearer the heart. These EKG results were far less worrisome, but there still was an abnormality in one part of my heart function they wanted to explore.  Hence, the stress test. (The photo to the left is not my EKG and is for demonstration purposes only. Courtesy of Pharmacotherapy Publications via Medscape.com)

Dave made me very comfortable during that test. He even supplied a blanket since nuclear medicine rooms need to be kept very cold. I was injected with a slightly radioactive dye, but was assured this went nowhere near the kidneys and was so safe that I didn’t even have to check with the nephrologist about its use.

The test results came back normal. According to Dr. Waram, an EKG may be too sensitive to female hearts.  I’m having trouble verifying that via research, but I have to admit I had no symptoms and no results. I wonder why the np. didn’t explain that so I wouldn’t worry about the possible diagnoses (infarction, which mean heart attack, was one of them) on the EKG print out she gave me.

Moral: Go to doctors you know or have an immediate affinity with.  I didn’t know any of these doctors, but was immediately frustrated with the np, while I immediately felt comfortable with Dr. Waram.  Is this sound medical advice?  Hardly, but it makes me feel better should I have to see that doctor again.

Of course, if you have no affinity with someone who is the best doctor for you, ignore my advice.  I’ve done that myself.  The nice thing about advice is that you don’t have to take it.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!