It Isn’t  Ain’t; It’s AIN.  

I’ll explain that in a minute, but first – on this Labor Day weekend – I want to thank all the readers who have liked individual blogs. These likes let me know I’m writing about topics that interest you.

Let’s turn to AIN now.  You know it’s not just a word, but an acronym. That’s a word formed by the initials of a term, like ASAP for as soon as possible. By the way, ‘nym’ means name, while ‘acr’ means height, summit, tip, top.  ‘O’ connects the two roots. So, we have the tip of the words or the first letters forming an acronym which becomes a recognized word. Thank you to my college course in Greek and Latin roots. I knew that would come on handy someday and it has again and again.

Well, what does AIN mean? It is the acronym for Allergic Interstitial Nephritis, which is a mouthful itself. ‘Allergic’ we get. That’s a common enough word. ‘Interstitial’, though? I remember the prefix (group of related words before the root word that changes its meaning) ‘inter’ means between, but between what? Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://bit.ly/3h3cF0H, here we come.

asituated within but not restricted to or characteristic of a particular organ or tissue —used especially of fibrous tissue

 baffecting the interstitial tissues of an organ or part

I wonder if we’ll need both definitions. I think we need to be reminded of what nephritis is before we can tell. Again, I remember from that college course so very long ago (Funny what sticks in your mind, isn’t it?) that ‘itis’ means inflammation. We know from all the writings about Chronic Kidney Disease that ‘neph’ means kidneys. Putting these together, we have inflammation of the kidneys. Let’s take a look at my favorite dictionary again, just to be certain.

Yep, there we have it at www.merriam-webster/dictionary/nephritis:

“acute or chronic inflammation of the kidney caused by infection, degenerative process, or vascular disease”

How do you define the whole term? According the excerpt from Nancy A. Finnigan and Khalid Bashir’s book Statpearls on NCBI’s bookshelf at https://bit.ly/31ZTeS2,

“Allergic interstitial nephritis (AIN) is the most common form of acute interstitial nephritis. It is most often caused by exposure to a drug. AIN is often associated with an acute decline in renal function and may be associated with permanent renal insufficiency.”

Acute? Oh, yes. That’s means sudden. It’s the opposite of chronic, which means long term. Looks like we only needed the second dictionary definition of interstitial after all.

So, this kind of nephritis is usually caused by drugs? Which drugs? I went to UpToDate at https://bit.ly/3i4exHS for the answer:

“The most common drug causes of AIN now include …:

  • Nonsteroidalanti-inflammatoryagents (NSAIDs), including selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors
  • Penicillinsand cephalosporins
  • Rifampin
  • Antimicrobial sulfonamides, including trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole
  • Ciprofloxacin and,perhaps toa lesser degree, other quinolones
  • Diuretics, including loop diuretics such as furosemide and bumetanide, and thiazide-type diuretics
  • Cimetidine (only rare cases have been described with other H-2 blockers such as ranitidine) [24,25]
  • Allopurinol
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as omeprazole and lansoprazole [26-29]
  • Indinavir
  • 5-aminosalicylates (eg, mesalamine)”

There are some very common drugs on this list. As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we are warned away from NSAIDS. I’ve been warned about Ciprofloxacin, too, and PPIs, but diuretics? Most of the other drugs we’d have to ask our doctors about when and if they’re prescribed. Then again, I ask my family doctor to check the effect of the drug on the kidneys when she prescribes a drug. She happily does so.

You should note that many of these drugs do not require a prescription. In that case, speak with your pharmacist about its possible effect on your kidneys before buying any over the counter drug. Another possibility is using Drugs.com or a similar website for possible effects on your kidneys before using any drugs.

What are the symptoms, if any, of AIN? Well, much like Chronic Kidney Disease, there are often no symptoms until it is quite advanced. Then you would notice the acute drop in kidney function. A blood test and urine test will help with the diagnosis, although the urine test will only show the presence of white blood cells. That indicates an infection. Sometimes a kidney biopsy is required to diagnose AIN.

And now the biggie: what do you do if you develop AIN? You stop the medication. It’s common sense. Your doctor will probably suggest that once it’s been determined you have allergic interstitial nephritis. Remember though, there are other causes of AIN such as infections and/or autoimmunity.

Topic switch: While I’ve been laboring over this blog, I’ve also been thinking about the fact that today is Labor Day in the United States. Coming from a union family, I thought I’d tell you a little bit about Labor Day that you may not know.

This, and more information about Labor Day, may be found at https://bit.ly/3jPeaRR

“In the late 1800s, the state of labor was grim as U.S. workers toiled under bleak conditions: 12 or more hour workdays; hazardous work environments; meager pay. Children, some as young as 5, were often fixtures at plants and factories.

The dismal livelihoods fueled the formation of the country’s first labor unions, which began to organize strikes and protests and pushed employers for better hours and pay. Many of the rallies turned violent.

On Sept. 5, 1882 — a Tuesday — 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march in a parade from City Hall to Union Square in New York City as a tribute to American workers. Organized by New York’s Central Labor Union, It [sic]was the country’s first unofficial Labor Day parade. Three years later, some city ordinances marked the first government recognition, and legislation soon followed in a number of states.”

As many of you already know, my grandfather was an organizer for the Brass Workers Union. Many a time he’d disappear. He was jailed for his activities, but that didn’t stop him.

As you labor to avoid AIN and keep your kidneys functioning properly, enjoy the holiday weekend.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Frustrated and Wondering

You’ve seen it all over the book’s Facebook page and on Twitter.  Yesterday was my birthday, my 66th birthday to be exact.  “I feel good.  I knew that I would,” as James Brown sings when someone calls me.  But what does my, uh, advanced age mean to my kidneys?James Brown

According to my nephrologist, I would lose 1/2 % of my kidney function each year since I was older.  Interesting… and wrong.  I’ve gained between 9 and 21 points on my GFR in the last five years.  It does vary depending on numerous factors: diet, sleep, exercise, stress, illness.

I had my blood drawn two weeks ago and the results told me that my GFR was 52, down from the 64 it had been only three months before. My primary care doctor told me not to worry about this lower number since I had clearly been incubating the flu at the time of the draw.

Here’s something you haven’t heard from me in a while (she wrote tongue in cheek): that got me to thinking.  What do illness – other than chronic kidney disease – and age have to do with your Glomerular Filtration Rate, a widely accepted indication of just how well your kidneys are functioning?

I found the following chart on The National Kidney Foundation’s website at http://www.kidney.org/professionals/kls/pdf/12-10-4004_KBB_FAQs_AboutGFR-1.pdf

      Average Measured GFR by Age in People Without CKD 

AGE  (Years)                   Average Measured GFR (mL/min/1.73 m2)

20-29                                                      116

30-39                                                      107

40-40                                                        99

50-59                                                        93

60-69                                                        85

70+                                                           75

Notice this is for people without CKD.   Now I’m not a mathematician, as we all know, but if those without our disease lose almost ten points of their GFR each decade they age, why am I not surprised that we who do have Chronic Kidney Disease are expected to be lose the same number of points?

By the way, that does take into account the 1/2% a year I would be losing on my GFR – according to my nephrologist – due to age.  But it’s just not happening.

This is a good place to mention that a reader was infuriated that her nephrologist never told her to double her rate to see where she was on the charts.  She previously had a kidney removed due to cancer and was living with one kidney.

Until she was given that information, she thought she should be on par with those living with two kidneys and was aghast as how low her GFR was.  I can see where her ire would rise (as well as her blood pressure from all that unnecessary worry).

I have been researching for hours and the only answers I’ve found to the question of how the flu affected my GFR were on forums or pay-an-expert-for-a-medical-answer sites.

kidney anatomySorry, folks, I just don’t trust them.  I will be seeing my nephrologist this week and will make it a point to ask him.

When I had the flu, my nephrologist told me to go right ahead and take the over the counter medications my primary physician had suggested and in the dosages recommended on the labels.  He did caution that I not take anything with the letter  ‘d’ in the name since that might raise my blood pressure.

Here’s what DaVita at http://www1.davita.com/3617 has to say about that:

When the flu season hits, the use of treatments for cold and flu soars. These medications often include compounds that can intensify

hypertension and salt retention. Should you require a product to treat cold and/or flu symptoms, it is strongly recommended that you

take them as prescribed by your doctor and carefully read the package instructions.

Notice we still don’t know if the flu affects the GFR.  Although, logically, if hypertension (high blood pressure) affects your kidneys and these medications may raise your blood pressure… perhaps that means they lower your GFR?

These are the kinds of questions that sent me running to interview different nephrologists, rather than trying to research my answers on the internet, when I was writing the book.

Attempting to research these questions brought me to this chart on the site of The National Kidney Disease Education Program – which is a part of The U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services – at http://www.nkdep.nih.gov/learn/testing/understand-gfr.shtml.GFR

I have included it here due to its clarity.  Seeing numbers written doesn’t always make it obvious just what the guidelines are, especially for those of us who think we’re not that good at math.

I certainly do not mean to beg the issue, but I’m getting nowhere looking for definitive answers as to how my age and any other illness such as the flu affect CKD.

We can all see how age and illness affect us as far as appearance, physical use of our body, and even shrinkage (Proof: I am ½ inch shorter due to the compression of the discs between my vertebrae), as well as the coughing, sneezing, and body aches of the flu.

Apparently, you have to be a doctor, or have the vocabulary of one, to be able to understand the connection of these conditions to your GFR.

On another note, The Southwest Nephrology Conference is on March 1 & 2 at Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Resort in Chandler.  That is simply too close to ignore.  I am thinking about going to meet all the specialists I’ve corresponded with from different parts of the country in person.

Could I interest any of you in joining me?  You can read more information about the conference at http://swnc.org/

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I keep forgetting to mention the book!  Since I no longer do book signings or book talks, the only way to get the information out there is for you to buy books for your friends and family.

Hey!  I’m donating as fast as I can! (Wait until my accountant hears about that.)

Until next week,

Keep living your life!