All Is Not Lost

Last week, I told you the good news about SlowItDownCKD 2015 being available in print and digital on And last week, I told the bad news about yet another member of my family being stricken with Parkinson’s disease.SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

I didn’t know much about the medication to ameliorate the symptoms of the disease, so that’s what I’m exploring this week. But… we need to go back a little bit to see what this myriad of symptoms consists of. Let’s start with a simple definition of Parkinson’s disease. We’ll call it PD, but remember that doesn’t mean peritoneal dialysis in this particular blog.

According to Consumer Health Digest at,

“Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system that progresses with time. It primarily affects the movement of a person. It develops steadily typically beginning with a slight tremor in one hand. Aside from causing tremor that is the most well-known sign of the disease, it also usually causes stiffness or the slowing of movement. During the early stages, the face may show very little, or no expression at all and the arms may not swing when the affected individual walks. Speech can also become softer or slurred.”no expression

I do see most of these symptoms in the newly diagnosed member of my family.  (Anecdote to lighten this heavy blog: one of my brothers has the ‘no expression’ symptom. A young fellow snidely called him stone face. I quietly told him my brother has Parkinson’s and can’t smile. My brother laughed. I laughed. Finally, the young fellow laughed, too.) What else?

The Mayo Clinic at answered my question:

“Tremor. A tremor, or shaking, usually begins in a limb, often your hand or fingers. You may notice a back-and-forth rubbing of your thumb and forefinger, known as a pill-rolling tremor. One characteristic of Parkinson’s disease is a tremor of your hand when it is relaxed (at rest).

Slowed movement (bradykinesia). Over time, Parkinson’s disease may reduce your ability to move and slow your movement, making simple tasks difficult and time-consuming. Your steps may become shorter when you walk, or you may find it difficult to get out of a chair. Also, you may drag your feet as you try to walk, making it difficult to move.

Rigid muscles. Muscle stiffness may occur in any part of your body. The stiff muscles can limit your range of motion and cause you pain.

Impaired posture and balance. Your posture may become stooped, or you may have balance problems as a result of Parkinson’s disease.

Loss of automatic movements. In Parkinson’s disease, you may have a decreased ability to perform unconscious movements, including blinking, smiling or swinging your arms when you walk.

Speech changes. You may have speech problems as a result of Parkinson’s disease. You may speak softly, quickly, slur or hesitate before talking. Your speech may be more of a monotone rather than with the usual inflections.

micrographiaWriting changes. It may become hard to write, and your writing may appear small.”

Oh, I’d seen all of these in him. Maybe he should have taken his neurologist’s suggestion that he begin medication, but it hadn’t been explained very well. Actually, it hadn’t been explained at all. So what was it?

Oh, my, there are so many different medications listed depending upon your unique set of symptoms. The most common is a combination of L-dopa and carbidopa according to WebMD at

“Levodopa (also called L-dopa) is the most commonly prescribed and most effective drug for controlling the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, particularly bradykinesia  and rigidity.

Levodopa is transported to the nerve cells in the brain that produce dopamine. It is then converted into dopamine for the nerve cells to use as a neurotransmitter.

…carbidopa increases its effectiveness and prevents or lessens many of the side effects of levodopa, such as nauseavomiting, and occasional heart rhythm disturbances.”

Hey, wait a minute! at is emphatic that you tell your doctor if you have diabetes or kidney disease BEFORE this is prescribed for you. Ummmmm, we have CKD; that’s kidney disease… and many of us have diabetes which caused the CKD. There’s the same warning about kidney disease on the same site for carbidopa.

Last week, I discovered that if you have ESRD, you’ll more likely to develop Parkinson’s. This brings up more and more questions for me. My newly diagnosed with Parkinson’s family member doesn’t have CKD, but I do… and you do. What if we reach end stage? What if we develop Parkinson’s? You know what? That’s what the specialists are for.parkinsons-disease-info

Thank you to for sharing the infogram above.

Looking at the medical treatments of a disease that’s fairly new to me, what I’ve realized is that your drug treatment has to be specifically tailored for you. You may have symptoms my loved one doesn’t; he may have symptoms you don’t. You may well tolerate a drug; he may need secondary drugs to counteract the side effects of the same drug. He may well tolerate a drug you just can’t without several secondary drugs to counteract the side effects.

When one of my brothers told me this is a complicated disease, I don’t think I realized just how complicated. I’m not a doctor as I keep repeating. I know when we need one, a specialist at that, and now is the time.

Does that mean lose hope? Of course not, drugs are only one type of treatment for Parkinson’s. There’s a whole new field of physical therapy especially for movement disorders. Most of these will cover:

Strengtheningpd ex



Gait Training

Transfer Training

I’ve been watching my loved one struggle to lift himself off the couch, navigate turns while walking, and keep his balance. It could be heart breaking if we didn’t know help is available. The program he’ll be attending is intensive, four weeks of four days a week. The retired teacher over here told him to think of it as school. Honestly, I don’t care how he thinks of it as long as he does it.

What is it

Well, it’s time to try out some of his until therapy starts exercises with him.IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!


If Only It Had Been an April’s Fools Joke

I thought it was a mean April Fool’s joke, but it wasn’t. I thought I’d heard wrong, but I hadn’t. I thought this was a mistake, but it wasn’t. Both of my brothers have Parkinson’s Disease. Now another non-blood family member had just been diagnosed with the same disease… out of the blue, unexpectedly, seemingly impossibly.

PD – Parkinson’s Disease in this case, not to be confused with Peritoneal Dialysis – is not only a genetic driven disease, but sometimes an environmentally driven one. This relative had been in Viet Nam. This relative had had the job of patrolling the areas of the jungle that had been saturated with Agent Orange to defoliate for better visibility. He’d done that every 15 days for over a year. 45 years later, he’s been diagnosed with PD. A coincidence? Not according to his neurologist who immediately told him to file disability papers with the Veterans’ Administration based on this information.

agent orangeMy mind was tripping over itself trying to explain this all to you – and to me. I needed to know just what this Agent Orange was. at explained:

“a powerful herbicide and defoliant containing trace amounts of dioxin, a toxic impurity suspected of causing serious health problems, including cancer and genetic damage, in some persons exposed to it and birth defects in their offspring: used by U.S. armed forces during the Vietnam War to defoliate jungles.”

Dioxin? What’s that? It sounded familiar, but I couldn’t quite remember. I wanted a definition I could understand so I jumped right over to MedicineNet at

“One of a number of poisonous petroleum-derived chemicals which are produced when herbicides (substances used for killing plants) are made or when plastics are burned. Dioxins are chemically dibenzo-p-dioxins….”

Poisonous. That made me wonder what this poison could do to a human body. This is the list of those possibilities I found on the Veterans’ Administration’s Agent Orange website at

AL Amyloidosis, A rare disease caused when an abnormal protein, amyloid, enters tissues or organs

Chronic B-cell Leukemias, A type of cancer which affects white blood cellsdioxin

Chloracne (or similar acneform disease), A skin condition that occurs soon after exposure to chemicals and looks like common forms of   acne seen in teenagers.

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 (Me here: Diabetes is the number one cause of CKD.), A disease characterized by high blood sugar levels resulting from the body’s inability to respond properly to the hormone insulin

Hodgkin’s Disease, A malignant lymphoma (cancer) characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and by progressive anemia

Ischemic Heart Disease, A disease characterized by a reduced supply of blood to the heart,  that leads to chest pain

Multiple Myeloma, A cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell in bone marrow

Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, A group of cancers that affect the lymph glands and other lymphatic tissue

tremorParkinson’s Disease (My bolding), A progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects muscle movement

Peripheral Neuropathy, Early-Onset, A nervous system condition that causes numbness, tingling, and motor weakness.

Porphyria Cutanea Tarda, A disorder characterized by liver dysfunction and by thinning and blistering of the skin in sun-exposed areas.

Prostate Cancer, Cancer of the prostate; one of the most common cancers among men

Respiratory Cancers (includes lung cancer), Cancers of the lung, larynx, trachea, and bronchus

Soft Tissue Sarcomas (other than osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Kaposi’s sarcoma, or mesothelioma), A group of different types of cancers in body tissues such as muscle, fat, blood and lymph vessels, and connective tissuespd

My heart sank. But what of the Parkinson’s patient who also has Chronic Kidney Disease. How will the CKD be affected by the PD? We already know we, as CKD patients, can develop muscle weakness and tiredness due to our poorly filtered blood (We know you’re trying, damaged kidneys.). Parkinson’s does the same. I couldn’t even image being the victim of doubly weak muscles.

I found a number of scholarly studies on the effects of PD on those with CKD, but each site was of the purchase-the-study-if-you-want-to-read-it type. That was a bit too costly for me. I still needed more information though.

I discovered that renal disease does contribute to “excessive daytime sleepiness in PD patients” (, although I was actually looking for PD effects on CKD. We’re already tired. Does this mean we’ll be even more tired should we develop PD?

banner-nihlogoReady to be shocked? Here we go: “ESRD is significantly associated with an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. Close surveillance for Parkinson’s disease should be considered for patients with ESRD.” Oh great. As if we didn’t have enough to worry about. By the way, ESRD is end stage renal disease. Once again, the National Institutes of Health gave us this information. Take a look at the study’s abstract at

While not exactly on topic, I found this disturbing similarity between the two diseases:

“Frustratingly, for kidney failure patients, the routine laboratory tests are almost never abnormal, and only hint abnormality when the failure process has already begun.  In Parkinson’s disease, as in kidney failure, a ‘threshold’ of cells must be lost before one manifests symptoms.”

There’s more, much more, from The Center for Movement Disorder and Neurorestoration at

Now I’m beginning to wonder if the drugs for Parkinson’s exit the body through the kidneys, but I think that’s a topic for another blog. I also realize that having CKD may affect PD more than PD may affect CKD. Sometimes, I surprise myself with what I learn.SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

On the other hand, I have some good news. Yay! SlowItDownCKD 2015 is now available in print form and the digital form has been updated somewhat. Click on the title to go right to Amazon. One of my readers tells me I get more editing done when I’m sick (Yep, I have the flu.) than at any other time. I believe she has a point there.What is it

Part 2



Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The Coffee Blog

Last week’s blog discussed different kinds of drinks.  I mentioned that coffee is my favorite.  Since I’m still recovering from the second cataract surgery and we all know how good it feels to be self-indulgent when you’re recovering, this week’s blog is all about coffee.  I won’t be repeating what I included in last week’s blog, but there is quite a bit of medical information about coffee available.  Let me just pour myself a cup and I’ll tell you….

We’re smiling because we’ve just had COFFEE.

Really? Drinking Coffee Lowers Colon Cancer Risk

Over the years, most studies of the subject have been either small or plagued by methodological flaws. But recently a team of researchers at the National Cancer Institute followed half a million Americans over 15 years. The researchers looked in detail at their diets, habits and health, and found that people who drank four or more cups of coffee a day — regular or decaf — had a 15 percent lower risk of colon cancer compared with coffee abstainers. While the researchers could not prove cause and effect, they did find that the link was dose-responsive: Greater coffee consumption was correlated with a lower colon cancer risk. The effect held even after they adjusted their findings for factors like exercise, family history of cancer, body weight, and alcohol and cigarette use.

The address for this article is:

And to answer your question about what colon cancer has to do with chronic kidney disease, you have to remember you are medically compromised already. Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as chronic kidney disease  is.  By the way, it’s said that alkaline foods are a better way of eating should  cancer rear its ugly head in your life.

But that’s not all  drinking coffee can do for you:

Coffee Drinking Linked to Lower Death Risk

Older adults who drank coffee—caffeinated or decaffeinated—had a lower risk of death overall than others who did not, according a study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute and AARP. Coffee drinkers were less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, injuries and accidents, diabetes, and infections.

You can find this information at

I am an older (thank you for that ‘er’) adult. I absolutely love coffee. I also have chronic kidney disease which may lead me down the primrose path to diabetes.  Perhaps I can prevent that?  Too bad I’m restricted to two cups a day.

This one can get a bit technical so I’ve copied the most easily understood part of it:

Coffee consumption inversely associated with risk of most common form of skin cancer

PHILADELPHIA — Increasing the number of cups of caffeinated coffee you drink could lower your risk of developing the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

“Our data indicate that the more caffeinated coffee you consume, the lower your risk of developing basal cell carcinoma,” said Jiali Han, Ph.D., associate professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston and Harvard School of Public Health.

You can find the whole article at

So coffee – formerly universally maligned by the medical community – now can help prevent colon and skin cancer and prolong your life.  I’m liking this very much, but we’re not done, folks.  I’m grinding (love being punny) the sources out right now.

 I am in heaven!  Look what I found at (You’ll probably understand my over the top joy if you remember I’ve had both a root canal and a crown replacement so the dentist could reach the cavity underneath the crown  this summer.  Both were so expensive that, even with insurance, I’ll be paying them off well into the new year.)

9 Healthy Reasons to Indulge Your Coffee Cravings

 Coffee gets a bad rap, but study after study shows your java habit is actually good for you. From a lower stroke risk to fewer cavities, here are the best reasons to enjoy a cup or two.

“Coffee is incredibly rich in antioxidants, which are responsible for many of its health benefits,” says Joy Bauer, RD, nutrition and health expert for Everyday Health and The Today Show. Its caffeine content may also play a protective role in some health conditions, but many of coffee’s health perks hold up whether you go for decaf or regular.

According to this article, coffee can help avoid diabetes, skin cancer, stress, cavities, Parkinson’s disease, breast cancer, heart disease, and head and neck cancers.

Parkinson’s disease runs in the family, too.  That’s another reason I’m so happy to have found this article.

One of the most romantic acts my sweet Bear performs is bringing me a cup of coffee to wake me up each day.  Sharing that time as we drink our coffee in bed cements the connection between us.  Could be I’m mixing up coffee and love, but there does seem to be some kind of interaction there.

My neighbor Amy – one of the busiest people I know – makes time to come over for a cup of coffee whenever she can.  She gets an hour’s break from her three kids and household duties or gets to de-stress from her work day and I get the pleasure of her company and hearing what’s going on in her life.

There’s more to coffee than caffeine.

An aside: talk about over problem solving – I just happened to notice that I can link websites from wordpress, too.  I seem to be doing a lot of that over stuff as I get older!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!