It’s Like the Sahara in There

I like my dentist, especially when he tells me something I didn’t know. When I went to see him last time, I told him my chemo experience and how dry my mouth was. I thought they might be related. He patiently gave me the same information as the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dry-mouth/symptoms-causes/syc-20356048.

“Dry mouth, or xerostomia (zeer-o-STOE-me-uh), refers to a condition in which the salivary glands in your mouth don’t make enough saliva to keep your mouth wet. Dry mouth is often due to the side effect of certain medications or aging issues or as a result of radiation therapy for cancer. Less often, dry mouth may be caused by a condition that directly affects the salivary glands.

Saliva helps prevent tooth decay by neutralizing acids produced by bacteria, limiting bacterial growth and washing away food particles. Saliva also enhances your ability to taste and makes it easier to chew and swallow. In addition, enzymes in saliva aid in digestion.

Decreased saliva and dry mouth can range from being merely a nuisance to something that has a major impact on your general health and the health of your teeth and gums, as well as your appetite and enjoyment of food.

Treatment for dry mouth depends on the cause.”

The joke’s on me. I developed dry mouth before the radiation treatments began. At least my salivary glands weren’t having any issues of their own. It seems we discussed xerostomia at the right time.

Wait a minute. Something is pulling on my memory. Something about Chronic Kidney Disease and dry mouth. Of course, periodontics and CKD. The Journal Of Clinical Periodontology at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/doSearch?AllField=chronic+kidney+disease&SeriesKey=1600051x had just what I was trying to remember. By the way, this is a fascinating free online library by John Wiley, a publisher I remember well from when I worked as an educator.

“Periodontitis had significant direct effect, and indirect effect through diabetes, on the incidence of CKD. Awareness about systemic morbidities from periodontitis should be emphasized.”

In other words, if you have CKD or diabetes, make certain your dentist knows so he or she can monitor you for the beginning of periodontic problems. Just as with any other medical issue, the sooner you start treatment, the better. I can attest to this since I caught my pancreatic cancer early, which gave me a much better chance of eradicating it from my body.

The treatment for dry mouth seems simple enough, as explained by Healthline (Thank you again for the two awards!) at https://www.healthline.com/symptom/dry-mouth.

“Dry mouth is usually a temporary and treatable condition. In most cases, you can prevent and relieve symptoms of dry mouth by doing one or more of the following:

  • sipping water often
  • sucking on ice cubes
  • avoiding alcohol, caffeine, and tobacco
  • limiting your salt and sugar intake
  • using a humidifier in your bedroom when you sleep
  • taking over-the-counter saliva substitutes
  • chewing sugarless gum or sucking on sugarless hard candy
  • over- the-counter toothpastes, rinses, and mints

If your dry mouth is caused by an underlying health condition, you may require additional treatment. Ask your doctor for more information about your specific condition, treatment options, and long-term outlook.”

The sugarless gum works well for me and, as an added benefit, quelled the nausea from the radiation treatments, too. While I don’t drink or smoke, I will have an occasional half cup of coffee when I can tolerate it. I didn’t know this was something to be avoided. As both a CKD patient and a type 2 diabetic (Thanks, pancreatic cancer.), I was already avoiding salt and sugar. So, without realizing it, I was already helping myself deal with dry mouth. Lucky me.

That got me to thinking. What other problems could dry mouth cause? I went to NHS Inform at https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/mouth/dry-mouth to look for an answer. Indeed, this is a Scottish website, but a mouth is a mouth no matter where it’s located, right?

  • “a burning sensation or soreness in your mouth
  • dry lips
  • bad breath (halitosis)
  • a decreased or altered sense of taste
  • recurrent mouth infections, such as oral thrush
  • tooth decay and gum disease
  • difficulty speaking, eating or swallowing”

On a personal note, I found the halitosis embarrassing and the altered sense of taste frustrating. And here, I’d been blaming the chemo for that. Maybe it was the chemo, although my age could also be the cause of my dry mouth. I do admit that 72 could be considered “aging.” My husband orders the groceries and we now have a pantry full of food I used to love but all taste, well, funny now. Poor guy, he was just trying to get me to eat when he ordered the food. He knew calorie intake is important when you’re dealing with cancer.

I wondered what the symptoms of dry mouth were… well, other than a dry mouth, that is.

“Common symptoms include:

  • A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth
  • Frequent thirst
  • Sores in the mouth; sores or split skin at the corners of the mouth; cracked lips
  • A dry feeling in the throat
  • A burning or tingling sensation in the mouth and especially on the tongue
  • A dry, red, raw tongue
  • Problems speaking or trouble tasting, chewing, and swallowing
  • Hoarseness, dry nasal passages, sore throat
  • Bad breath

Thank you to WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-health-dry-mouth#1 for the above information.

Will you look at that! Just as diabetes can cause CKD and CKD can cause diabetes, bad breath (halitosis), soreness or burning sensation in the mouth can both be symptoms of dry mouth and problems caused by dry mouth.

Let’s see now. What else can I tell you about dry mouth? DentistryIQ at https://www.dentistryiq.com/clinical/oral-cancer/article/16356305/facts-about-dry-mouth is a new site for me. They describe themselves as “… a leading source of information that helps dental professionals achieve excellence in their positions, whether that position is dentist, dental practice owner, dental hygienist, dental office manager, dental assistant, or dental school student.” I went there to find out just how many people suffer from dry mouth.

“It is estimated to affect millions of people in the United States, particularly women and the elderly…. Current research indicates that approximately one in four adults suffer from dry mouth, and this figure increases to 40 percent in populations over the age of 55….”

This was back in 2006, and unfortunately are the most current figures I could find. Please let us know if you can find more current numbers.

Personal note: Tomorrow I will be having surgery to remove the pancreatic cancerous tumor I’ve been dealing with since last February. The blogs will be posted right on time, but comments, emails, etc. probably won’t be answered for a while. I’ve been told this is an arduous surgery with a long, slow recovery period. Keep well until we can communicate again.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Me and My Llama, Going to the Dentist Today

No, I’m not crazy and I’m not talking about one of the llamas living only a few miles from my home. Nor am I ignoring the rules of structure.

Today’s title is from the lyrics of a song sung on the children’s television show Sesame Street just about the time my first born (the ever interesting Ms. Nima Beckie)llama had her first dental appointment.  Believe me, it helped reduce her anxiety – and mine – about that appointment.

You guessed it.  I’ve been getting questions about Chronic Kidney Disease and dental health. I know some readers are saying, “Huh?” I did, too, until I did some research. (Maybe my brand should be, “I research so you don’t have to,” instead of “SlowItDownCKD”?)

By the way, in fulfilling an assignment for Landmark Worldwide’s Wisdom Unlimited course I discovered I first started researching in fifth grade.  My topic? Ladies in Waiting. My research results? Dismal.  I sure am glad those days of encyclopedias and library books only for research are over. Oh wait, I was writing about dental health.

You’ve already read my previous blogs about the safety of nitrous oxide (laughing gas) and Novocain, so today’s blog is going to be about the laughingconnection between CKD and dental problems.  If you remember that diabetes is the leading cause of CKD, you’ve already figured out that the diabetes itself could be causing the dental problems with people suffering from both CKD and diabetes.

But what about those of us who don’t have diabetes.  Why could we be prone to dental problems? I started my research with DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/symptoms-and-diagnosis/dental-health-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4731

A study in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology reported that people with kidney disease and those on dialysis are more likely to have periodontal disease and other oral health problems than the general population. Buildup of bacteria in the mouth can cause infection. Because people with kidney disease have weakened immune systems, they are more susceptible to infections.

Journal of CLinical Perioldontolgy coverBone loss in the jaw can occur in those with kidney disease. Calcium imbalance contributes to loss of calcium from the bones resulting in weak bones. Weak bones can cause teeth to become loose and potentially fall out. The best way to help prevent bone loss is to make sure calcium and phosphorus levels stay within the goal range.

Oh, there is so much to go with there! I immediately started digging into What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for whatever it was that was tickling my memory and found it in the glossary on page 136.

What is itVitamin D: Regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels as well as promoting bone formation, among other tasks – affects the immune system.

We know vitamin D can be a real problem for us.  How many of you are taking vitamin D supplements? Notice my hand is raised, too.  How many of you read my blogs about vitamin D?  Good!  The rest of you, it might be a good idea to use the topic search to find and read them. You know, “I research so you don’t have to,” etc.

I’ve read again and again in the online support groups that there are major questions about controlling your phosphorous intake, specifically keeping it low. Keep that in mind when you think of CKD and dental health.

plaqueThe biggest part CKD plays in dental health and periodontic issues is that of lowering your immune system. Remember my writing about proteinuria, something you can develop with CKD? Quick reminder: this is just what it sounds like; protein leaks into the urine. The problem is that antibodies are made up of protein. Antibodies is defined by Dictionary.com at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/antibodies as

A protein substance produced in the blood or tissues in response to a specific antigen, such as a bacterium or a toxin, that destroys or weakens bacteria and neutralizes organic poisons, thus forming the basis of immunity.

Lose lots of protein into your urine and you’re losing some of your immunity. In other words, you’re open to infection.

How do you get an infection in your mouth in the first place, you ask. Think about plaque. This is what the National Center for Biotechnology Information, part of the National Institutes of Health, offered at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK8259/

Dental decay is due to the irreversible solubilization of tooth mineral by acid produced by certain bacteria that adhere to the tooth surface in bacterial communities known as dental plaque.interior of tooth

In other words, you eat and the acid in your food combines with bacteria to form plaque which then starts to demineralize your tooth enamel.  Usually, you have the antibodies in your immune system to prevent cavities… although we probably all know someone without CKD who doesn’t.  You, as a CKD sufferer, do not have the necessary antibodies.  The CKD has already compromised your immune system.

This is what the University of Maryland Medical Center at http://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/periodontal-disease has to say about gingivitis and periodontitis.gingivitis

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gingiva, or gums. It is characterized by tender, red, swollen gums that bleed easily and may cause bad breath (halitosis). Gingivitis can be treated by good dental hygiene, proper diet, and stopping smoking. Untreated gingivitis can lead to periodontitis.

Periodontitis occurs when the gum tissues separate from the tooth and sulcus (Me, here. That means  the space between the tooth and the gum.) forming periodontal pockets. Periodontitis is characterized by:

Gum inflammation, with redness and bleeding

Deep pockets (greater than 3 mm in depth) that form between the gum and the tooth

Loose teeth, caused by loss of connective tissue structures and bone

Plenty of space for bacteria to sneak in and attack your already compromised immune system.

I realize this is light weight research for those who are already suffering from these ailments, but hoped only to enlighten those of us who’d never even considered these possibilities and maybe, just maybe, help you understand just a bit better.

Say, if you live in Arizona, don’t forget about this:

free Path to Wellness health screening in Mesa at Adelante Healthcare 1705 W. Main St. on the 20th from 8 to 1:30 this Saturday.

Until next week,Digital Cover Part 2 redone - CopyDIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Keep living your life!