B.U.N. No, not bun. B.U.N.

Let’s consider this part 2 of last week’s blog since all these terms and tests and functions are intertwined for Chronic Kidney Disease patients. Thanks to reader Paul (not my Bear, but another Paul) for emphatically agreeing with me about this.

Bing! Bing! Bing! I know where to start. This is from The National Kidney Disease Education Program at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ information about being tested for CKD.

“If necessary, meaning if your kidney function is compromised, your pcp will make certain you get to a nephrologist promptly.  This specialist will conduct more intensive tests that include:

Blood:

BUN –

BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. Urea nitrogen is what forms when protein breaks down.”

If you read last week’s blog about creatinine, you know there’s more to the testing than that and that more of the information is in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. No sense to repeat myself so soon.

Let’s take this very slowly. I don’t think it necessary to define blood, but urea? Maybe. I found this in SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“But how can I explain blood urea?  I’ll allow the experts to do that.

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/routine-kidney-function-blood-test has the simplest explanation.

‘Urea is a waste product formed from the breakdown of proteins. Urea is usually passed out in the urine. A high blood level of urea (‘uraemia’) indicates that the kidneys may not be working properly or that you are dehydrated (have low body water content).’

In the U.S., we call this test B.U.N. or Blood Urea Nitrogen Blood Test.  So as I understand it, if your protein intake is high, more urea is produced.  But since your kidneys are already compromised by CKD, the toxins remaining in your body are not eliminated as well….”

You with me so far? If there’s suspicion of CKD, your nephrologist tests your serum creatinine (see last week’s blog) and your BUN.  Wait a minute; I haven’t explained nitrogen yet. Oh, I see; it has to be defined in conjunction with urea.

Thanks to The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/understanding-your-lab-values for clearing this up:

“Urea nitrogen is a normal waste product in your blood that comes from the breakdown of protein from the foods you eat and from your body metabolism. It is normally removed from your blood by your kidneys, but when kidney function slows down, the BUN level rises. BUN can also rise if you eat more protein, and it can fall if you eat less protein.”

So now the reason for this protein restriction I wrote about in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease should be clear.

“So, why is protein limited? One reason is that it is the source of a great deal of phosphorus. Another is that a number of nephrons were already destroyed before you were even diagnosed. Logically, those that remain compensate for those that are no longer viable. The remaining nephrons are doing more work than they were meant to. Just like a car that is pushed too hard, there will be constant deterioration if you don’t stop pushing. The idea is to stop pushing your remaining nephrons to work even harder in an attempt to slow down the advancement of your CKD.  Restricting protein is a way to reduce the nephrons’ work.”

This is starting to sound like a rabbit warren – one piece leads to another, which verves off to lead to another, and so forth and so on. All right, let’s keep going anyway.

Guess what. Urea is also tested via the urine. Nothing like confusing the issue, at least to those of us who are lay people like me. Let’s see if Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/urea-nitrogen-urine#overview1 can straighten this out for us.

“Your body creates ammonia when it breaks down protein from foods. Ammonia contains nitrogen, which mixes with other elements in your body, including carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen to form urea. Urea is a waste product that is excreted by the kidneys when you urinate.

The urine urea nitrogen test determines how much urea is in the urine to assess the amount of protein breakdown. The test can help determine how well the kidneys are functioning, and if your intake of protein is too high or low. Additionally, it can help diagnose whether you have a problem with protein digestion or absorption from the gut.”

Hmmm, these two don’t sound that different to me other than what is being analyzed for the result – blood (although blood serum is used, rather than whole blood) or urine.

What about BUN to Creatinine tests? How do they fit in here? After all, this is part 2 of last week’s blog about creatinine. Thank you to Medicine Net at http://www.medicinenet.com/creatinine_blood_test/article.htm for explaining. “The BUN-to-creatinine ratio generally provides more precise information about kidney function and its possible underlying cause compared with creatinine level alone.”

Dizzy yet? I think that’s enough for one day.

In other news, the price of all my Chronic Kidney Disease books has been reduced by 20%. I think more people will avail themselves of this information if they cost less… and that’s my aim: CKD awareness. If you belong to Kindle’s share program, you can take advantage of the fact that the price there was reduced to $1.99. You can also loan my books to a Kindle friend or borrow them from one for free for 14 days. Or you can ask your local librarian to order all five books, another way of reading them free. I almost forgot: as a member of Kindle Unlimited and the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, you also read the books for free although you do need to pay your usual monthly subscription fee.

Students: Please be aware that some unscrupulous sites have been offering to rent you my books for a term for much more than it would cost to buy them. I’ve succeeded in getting most of them to stop this practice, but more keep popping up.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

So That’s How It’s Decided

SlowItDownCKD’s being honored as one of the best kidney disease blogs for 2016 has had some interesting results.  The first was the health and food writer’s guest blog about hydration for Chronic Kidney Disease on March 6th. Then it was the guest blog by the Social Security Administration’s Outreach Director. This week, it’s a telephone interview with Dr. Michael J. Germain, a nephrologist from Massachusetts, about some of the suggested guidelines in the upcoming KDIGO for 2016.

Got it:  backtrack. Let’s start with KDIGO. This stands for KIDNEY DISEASE | IMPROVING GLOBAL OUTCOMES. Their homepage at KDIGO.org states, “KDIGO MISSION – Improving the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through the development and implementation of global clinical practice guidelines.” Anyone up for visiting their offices? What an excuse to go to Belgium!

Okay, now we know what the organization is and what it does, but why Dr. Germain? I asked the same question. Although he is not on the KDIGO panel of doctors who decide what the next year’s development and implementation will be, he is well versed with the topic having published or having been part of the writing for an overwhelming number of articles in such esteemed journals as the American Journal of Kidney Disease, Kidney International, and The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, as well as contributing to textbooks, … and he could simplify the medicalese in the guidelines to simple English for this lay person.

If you think I remind you quite often that I’m not a doctor, you should read my emails to our liaison. State I’m not a doctor, repeat, state I’m not a doctor, repeat. She had the good graces to laugh at my insecurities.

The latest guideline updates have not been released yet, so both the good doctor (over 40 years as a nephrologist) and I (CKD patient and awareness advocate for a decade) were working off the draft that was released last August.

Dr. Germain also made it a point to ensure that I understand the guidelines are based upon expert opinion, not evidence. That made sense to me since he is not only a patient seeing nephrologist, but also a research nephrologist – to which his numerous publications will attest. With me being a lay person, he “had a lot of ‘splaining to do.” I had to admire his passion when discussing the vitamin D guidelines.

In the draft guidelines, it was suggested that hypercalcemia be avoided. I know; it’s a new word. We already know that hyper is a prefix meaning over or too much; think excessive in this case. Calcemia looks sort of like calcium. Good thinking because, according to Healthline at http://www.healthline.com/health/hypercalcemia:“Hypercalcemia is a condition in which you have too high a concentration of calcium in your blood. Calcium performs important functions, such as helping keep your bones healthy. However, too much of it can cause problems….”

This excerpt from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease explains how calcium works with vitamin D and phosphorous.

“The kidneys produce calcitrol which is the active form of vitamin D. The kidneys are the organs that transfer this vitamin from your food and skin [sunshine provides it to your skin] into something your body can use. Both vitamin D and calcium are needed for strong bones. It is yet another job of your kidneys to keep your bones strong and healthy. Should you have a deficit of Vitamin D, you’ll need to be treated for this, in addition for any abnormal level of calcium or phosphates. The three work together. Vitamin D enables the calcium from the food you eat to be absorbed in the body. CKD may leech the calcium from your bones and body.”

The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 offers us more information.

“The parathyroid glands are located in the neck, near or attached to the back side of the thyroid gland. Parathyroid hormone controls calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D levels in the blood and bone. Release of PTH is controlled by the level of calcium in the blood. Low blood calcium levels cause increased PTH to be released, while high blood calcium levels block PTH release. …  Thanks to MedLine Plus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003690.htm .”

As Dr. Germain explained, CKD patients break down vitamin D quickly since they have more of a catabolic enzyme, the enzyme that converts the vitamin D to an inactive form. Oh, right, catabolic means “any destructive process by which complex substances are converted by living cells into more simple compounds, with release of energy” according to Dorland’s Medical Dictionary for Health Consumers.

Here’s the problem: vitamin D can cause hypercalcemia. Dr. Germain phrased it, “In fact, the draft guideline recommends active vitamin D hormone therapy not to be routinely used in patients with CKD stage 3 or 4 due to increased risk of hypercalcemia and the lack of efficacy shown in studies.” Therefore, he urges nephrologists to wait until stage 4 or 5 to recommend vitamin D since hyperparathryoidism may lead to bone damage. But just as in any disease, it is harder to treat bone damage once it’s already there. His recommendation: Ask about your parathyroid level every three to six months and discuss the results of your tests with your nephrologist. By the way, his feeling – and obviously mine – is that preserving the kidney function is the most important job of the nephrologist and the patient.

I am eager to see the guidelines published so I can write more about them. The conclusion about vitamin D is based upon what nephrologists have seen in their practices since the last set of KDIGO guidelines were published in 2009. It will affect the way our nephrologists speak with us about our treatment, just as the other guidelines for 2016 will.

That will affect the way we self-manage. For example, I restrict my sun time to 15 minutes a day based on these findings. Take a look at how you self-manage. It should bring up a list of questions for you to ask your nephrologist at your next appointment.

You should also know the KDIGO deals with all stages of CKD including End Stage CKD and pediatric CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Yet Another Possibility

Today we have yet another fitness plan? Weight loss plan? Health plan? Beauty plan? I don’t know what to call it since they offer so many different types of products. What’s that, you ask. It’s called Wakaya Perfection. It seems a great number of my friends and acquaintances have been involved in their health in this way recently. They, however, do not have Chronic Kidney Disease.

Let’s get this part out of the way: I want to go there. Yes, there. Wakaya is not only a company, but an island in the South Pacific and it.is.beautiful. Take a look at their website (wakayaperfection.com) so you can see for yourself… but, of course, that’s not what this blog is about.

The company has several different lines, so I decided to look at one product from each to evaluate them for CKD patients. Remember, should they not be viable options for CKD patients does not mean they’re not viable for those without CKD.

Let’s start with the weight loss products since that’s what’s on my mind lately. That would be the Bula SlimCap. This is what their website has to say about these caps:

“At Wakaya Perfection, when we say all natural, that is exactly what we mean. Our tropical flavors are:

  • Sugar Free
  • Fat Free
  • Gluten Free

And Contain:

  • NO Artificial Flavors, Ingredients or Colors
  • NO Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
  • NO Insect or Animal Matter
  • NO Growth Hormones
  • NO Antibiotics
  • NO Herbicides or Pesticide

That sounds great and appeals to me. Wait a minute, natural is good, but what is it that’s natural? I couldn’t find an ingredient list other than this:

  • All Natural Flavors
  • Active Ingredients
  • Pink Fijian Ginger
  • Stevia Reb-A 98%
  • Quick Dissolve Blend

What makes it a quick dissolve blend? What are the all natural flavors? What are the active ingredients? Ginger is permissible for CKD patients, but how much ginger is in each cap? And as for Stevia Reb-A 98%, this is a warning I found on New Health Guide at http://www.newhealthguide.org/Stevia-Side-Effects.html: “The FDA has noted that stevia may have a negative impact on the kidneys, reproductive, cardiovascular systems or blood sugar control.” Uh-oh, they mentioned our kidneys.

Oh well, that’s only one product and maybe there’s some other source of ingredients somewhere. Hmmm, I’d want to know what’s in a product and how much of each ingredient is in it before I took it, especially with CKD on my plate.

Let’s switch to a fitness product. I stayed away from the protein shake meal replacements for the reasons I explained about such products in SlowItDownCKD 2016. This is the poignant part of that blog:

“Ladies and gentlemen, our protein intake is restricted because we have CKD. Why would we take a chance on increasing the protein in our bodies? Here’s a reminder from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease about why we need to limit our protein.

‘So, why is protein limited? One reason is that it is the source of a great deal of phosphorus. Another is that a number of nephrons were already destroyed before you were even diagnosed. Logically, those that remain compensate for those that are no longer viable. The remaining nephrons are doing more work than they were meant to. Just like a car that is pushed too hard, there will be constant deterioration if you don’t stop pushing. The idea is to stop pushing your remaining nephrons to work even harder in an attempt to slow down the advancement of your CKD.  Restricting protein is a way to reduce the nephrons’ work.’”

Why don’t we take a look at the BulaFit Burn Capsules? Wakaya Perfection describes them as,

“A potent combination of herbs and extracts that help you manage appetite/cravings while providing sustained energy and heightened focus throughout your day. BulaFIT BURN™ is designed to help boost fat burning and provide a sense of wellbeing that reduces cravings for food and snacking.

When combined with a healthy diet and exercise, BURN capsules promote a sense of well being and energy that reduces cravings for food and snacking. BURN can also play an important role in increasing the results of ketosis and even avoiding the ‘keto flu’ that some people may experience with other ketogenic programs.”

Huh? What’s keto flu? I figured a site with the name Keto Size Me (http://ketosizeme.com/keto-flu-101-everything-need-know/) could help us out here… and they did. “The ‘keto flu’ is what we commonly call carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms usually occur in people who start a low carb diet that alters their hormones and causes and electrolyte imbalances.”

Wait! Electrolyte imbalances? But we work so hard with the renal diet trying to keep these within the proper range for CKD. I went back to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for a little reminder about electrolytes.

“In order to fully understand the renal diet, you need to know a little something about electrolytes. There are the sodium, potassium, and phosphate you’ve been told about and also calcium, magnesium, chloride, and bicarbonate. They maintain balance in your body….Too much or too little of a certain electrolyte presents different problems.”

Nope, not me. I’m keeping my electrolytes right where they belong. This is not looking good for the Chronic Kidney Disease patient. I vote no; you, of course, have to make up your own mind.

News of a local opportunity: This year’s first Path of Wellness Screening will be Saturday, June 17th at the Indo American Cultural Center’s community hall, 2809 W. Maryland Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85017. The free screening events can process up to 200 people.  Their use of point-of-care testing devices provides blood and urine test results in a matter of minutes, which are reviewed onsite by volunteer physicians.  All screening participants are offered free enrollment in chronic disease self-management workshops.  Help is also given to connect participants with primary care resources.  The goals of PTW are to improve early identification of at-risk people, facilitate their connection to health care resources, and slow the progression of chronic diseases in order to reduce heart failure, kidney failure and the need for dialysis.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Women and Water (Men, too)

Welcome to March: National Kidney Month and Women’s History Month. I’m going to fudge a bit on the ‘History’ part of that as I did last month with Black History Month. I don’t often have guest bloggers, but this month will feature two women as guest bloggers in honor of Women’s History Month. The first is Jessica Walter, who sent me the following email last month:

Hi There,

I am a freelance health and food writer, I have teamed up with a small senior lifestyle advice site, I worked with them to develop a complete guide on how to eat better and be healthier from a dietary point of view. This includes detailed information on why being hydrated is so important. … you can check out the article here:

https://www.senioradvisor.com/ blog/2017/02/7-tips-on- developing-better-eating- habits-in-your-senior-years/.

I liked what Jessica had to say and how easily it could be adapted not only for senior Chronic Kidney Disease patients, but all Chronic Kidney Disease patients.

In addition, she sent me this short article about hydration and CKD. It’s easy to read and has some information we constantly need to be reminded of.

Staying Hydrated When You Have Chronic Kidney Disease

We all know that drinking water is important for our health, and monitoring fluid intake is critical for those with chronic kidney disease. Too much water can be problematic, but so can too little. Dehydration can be serious for those with chronic kidney disease. If you are suffering from vomiting, diarrhea, fever, or diabetes, or if you urinate frequently, you may become dehydrated because you are losing more fluid than you are taking in. For those without chronic kidney disease, the solution is to increase the intake of water until the body is sufficiently hydrated.

Since dehydration can decrease blood flow to the kidneys, and as fluid intake must be controlled in patients with chronic kidney disease, it’s important to closely monitor their fluid intake and loss in these circumstances.

Recognizing The Signs

The first step is to recognize the physical signs of dehydration. You may have a dry mouth or dry eyes, heart palpitations, muscle cramps, lightheadedness or fainting, nausea, or vomiting. You may notice a decrease in your urine output. Weight loss of more than a  pound or two over a few days can also be an indicator of dehydration. If you are taking ACE inhibitors and ARBs, such as lisinopril, enalapril, valsartan, or losartan, or water pills or diuretics, these medications can harm your kidneys if you become dehydrated. It is doubly important to be aware of signs of dehydration if you are on any of these medications.

Steps to Take

To rehydrate your body, start by increasing your intake of water and ensure that you are eating plenty of fruits and vegetables. (Me here: remember to stay within your renal diet guidelines for fruits, vegetables, and fluids.)If you cannot keep water down, or if increased consumption doesn’t alleviate the signs of dehydration, contact your health care provider  immediately.

They may also recommend a different fluid than plain water since electrolytes and minerals can also be reduced if you are dehydrated, but you may still need to watch your intake of potassium, phosphorus, protein, and sodium. Your doctor may recommend an oral rehydration solution that will restore your body to a proper level of hydration. If you have a fluid restriction because you are on dialysis, you should consult your healthcare provider if you have issues with or questions about hydration. Taking in or retaining too much fluid when you have these restrictions can lead to serious complications, including headaches, swelling, high blood pressure and even stroke. Carefully monitoring your fluid intake and watching for signs of dehydration will help you to avoid the consequences of dehydration.

I’ve blogged many times over the last six years about hydration. I’m enjoying reading this important material from another’s point of view. I’m sorry Jessica’s grandmother had to suffer this, but I’m also glad Jessica chose to share her writing about it with us.

 

This June, 2010, article included in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 furthers explains:

“.…Dr. HL Trivedi of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) said, ‘…. Rapid water loss causes the kidney’s functioning to slow down, resulting in temporary or permanent kidney failure.’

Extreme heat causes rapid water loss, resulting in acute electrolyte imbalance. The kidney, unable to cope with the water loss, fails to flush out the requisite amount of Creatinine and other toxins from the body. Coupled with a lack of consistent water intake, this brings about permanent or temporary kidney failure, explain experts.”

The article can be viewed directly at http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report_heat-induced-kidney-ailments-see-40pct-rise_1390589 and is from “Daily News & Analysis.”

The CDC also offers advice to avoid heat illness:

“People with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information.

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Don’t use the stove or oven to cook——it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness(http://www.cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning

It’s clear we need to keep an eye on our hydration. While we’re doing that, keep the other eye out for SlowItDownCKD 2016 purposely available on World Kidney Day on Amazon.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

February is Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month, I thought I would write about Blacks who have contributed to the research and treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease. I’ll be highlighting a few people and then dealing with why CKD is treated differently for Blacks.

Ladies first: Dr. Bessie Young is a nephrologist… and more. This is from The University of Washington’s Department of Medicine at young-bessiehttps://medicine.uw.edu/news/dr-bessie-young.

“Dr. Young is a professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology and holds adjunct titles in the Departments of Epidemiology and Health Services. She received her MD in 1987 and her MPH in 2001, both from the University of Washington.

Her research focuses on racial disparities and genetic factors predicting outcomes of patients with kidney disease, education regarding access to transplantation and dialysis for minorities, and access to kidney disease care in rural areas.”

While I have great admiration for both Drs. Young and Kountz (see below), I feel a connection with Dr. Vanessa Grubbs. We corresponded a bit when she first began her blog, which is both personal and professional. We all know I’m not a doctor and have never claimed to be one, but I’m convinced I can feel what a nephrologist feels when I read her blog.  This is from The California Health Care Foundation’s website at http://www.chcf.org/authors/vanessa-grubbs?article=%7BF610E00F-9FE7-4E95-AEBB-5781EE7E0F66%7D:

“Dr. Grubbs is an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology at the University of California, San Francisco, Zuckerberg San Francisco General vanessa-grubbHospital, where she has maintained a clinical practice and clinical research program since 2009. Though most of her time is dedicated to research and patient care, her passion is creative nonfiction writing. She is working on her first book, and she blogs at thenephrologist.com.”

Her book, Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers: A Kidney Doctor’s Search for the Perfect Match will be available on Amazon.com this June. By the way, she donated a kidney to her husband when they were only dating.

Samuel L. Kountz, M.D was another innovative contributor to Nephrology from the Black Community. As Blackpast.org tells us:

“In 1961 Kountz and Roy Cohn, another leading surgeon, performed the first successful kidney transplant between two people who were close relatives but not twins.  Over the next decade Kountz researched the process of kidney transplants on dogs.  He discovered that monitoring blood flow into the new kidney and administering methylprednisolone to the patient after surgery allowed the body to accept the new organ.    samuel-kountz

In 1966 Kountz joined the faculty at Stanford University Hospital and Medical School and in 1967 he became the chief of the kidney transplant service at University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).  There he worked with Folker Belzer to create the Belzer kidney perfusion machine.  This innovation kept kidneys alive for 50 hours after being removed from the donor.  Through Kountz’s involvement at UCSF, the institution’s kidney transplant research center became one the best in the country.  Kountz also created the Center for Human Values at UCSF, to discuss ethical issues concerning transplants.”

It’s time for an explanation as to why I wrote “why CKD is treated differently for Blacks,” isn’t it?

This is from Jane E. Brody’s article Doctors sharpen message on kidney disease reprinted in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1:

“There are four main risk factors for kidney disease:  diabetes, high blood pressure, age over 60 and a family history of the disease. Anyone with these risk factors should have a test of kidney function at least once a year, Vassalotti said.  (Me here: he was the National Kidney Foundation’s Chief Medical Officer at the time the article was written). Members of certain ethnic groups are also at higher than average risk: blacks, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans.”

This means physicians need to monitor blood pressure and diabetes more closely for blacks (as well as the other high risk groups).

Why, you ask.  This bit from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease will explain about the blood pressure.

“HPB can damage small blood vessels in the kidneys to the point that they cannot filter the waste from the blood as effectively as they should. Nephrologists may prescribe HBP medication to prevent your CKD from getting worse since these medications reduce the amount of protein in your urine.  Not too surprisingly, most CKD related deaths are caused by cardiovascular problems.”IMG_2979

As for diabetes, I turned to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, for this tidbit:

“According to Diabetes.co.uk at http://www.diabetes.co.uk/how-does-diabetes-affect-the-body.html, ‘The kidneys are another organ that is at particular risk of damage as a result of diabetes and the risk is again increased by poorly controlled diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol’”

In addition, there is a gene more prevalent in Blacks that can exacerbate their CKD. “This discovery provides direct evidence that African-Americans with established CKD and the APOL1 risk gene variant experience a faster decline in kidney function compared to their white counterparts, irrespective in most cases of what caused their kidney disease.” Afshin Parsa, M.D., a nephrologist at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore and a CRIC Study investigator.

parsaDr. Parsa was referring to the study on APOL1 which was published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

The following is from The National Kidney Foundation’s Fact Sheet on Blacks and CKD at https://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/factsheets/African-Americans-and-CKD.

  • Blacks and African Americans suffer from kidney failure at a significantly higher rate than Caucasians – more than 3 times higher.
  • African Americans constitute more than 35% of all patients in the U.S. receiving dialysis for kidney failure, but only represent 13.2% of the overall U.S. population.
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure in African Americans. African Americans are twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes as Caucasians. Approximately 4.9 million African Americans over 20 years of age are living with either diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes.
  • The most common type of diabetes in African Americans is type 2 diabetes. The risk factors for this type of diabetes include: family history, impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes during pregnancy, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, obesity and physical inactivity. African Americans with diabetes are more likely to develop complications of diabetes and to have greater disability from these complications than Caucasians. African Americans are also more likely to develop serious complications such as heart disease and strokes.
  • High blood pressure is the second leading cause of kidney failure among African Americans, and remains the leading cause of death due to its link with heart attacks and strokes.NKF-logo_Hori_OB

Today’s blog was a bit longer than usual to bring you this important information. We celebrate Black History Month AND need to make our Black family members, friends, and co-workers aware of their heightened risk so they can help prevent their own CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What Are You Doing for Others?

Today is Martin Luther King’s birthday. Today, more than ever, we need to heed his message. Whether you apply it to today’s bizarre political scene, your local community, your family, your co-workers doesn’t matter. What matters is the operant word: doing.

mlk-do-for-others

That picture and those words got me to thinking.  What AM I doing for others? And what still needs to be done?

My commitment is to spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). As a patient myself, I know how important this is. As you know, CKD is a costly, lethal disease if not caught early and treated… and it’s not just older folks – like me – who are at risk. One out of ten people worldwide has CKD, yet an overwhelming number of them are unaware they have it.

stages of CKDWe also know the disease can be treated, just not the way you’d usually expect a disease to be treated. A diet with restrictions on protein, potassium, phosphorous and sodium is one aspect of that treatment. Exercise, adequate sleep, and avoiding stress are some of the other aspects. Some patients – like me – may have to take medication for their high blood pressure since that also affects kidney function. Imagine preventing a death with lifestyle changes. Now image saving the lives of all those who don’t know they have CKD by making them aware this disease exists. Powerful, isn’t it?

We’re all aware by now that the basic method of diagnosing CKD is via routine blood and urine tests. Yet, many people do not undergo these tests during doctor or clinic visits, so don’t know they have Chronic Kidney Disease, much less start treating it. That’s where I come in; I tell people what can be done. I tell people how they can be diagnosed and treated, if necessary.IMG_2979

I was a private person before this CKD diagnosis so many years ago. Now, in addition to a Facebook page, LinkedIn, and twitter accounts as SlowItDownCKD, I make use of an Instagram account where I post an eye catching picture daily with the hashtag #SlowItDownCKD. This brings people to my weekly blog about CKD (the one you’re reading now) and the four books I wrote about it: What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease (which explains CKD) and the others – The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1; The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2; and SlowItDownCKD 2015 – which are the blogs in print for those who don’t have a computer or are not computer savvy.

Healthline is a well-respected, informative site for medical information. This past year this blog, SlowItDownCKD, was a winner in their list of The Six Best Kidney Disease Blogs. That brought the hits on my page up by the hundreds. That means hundreds more people are now aware of Chronic Kidney Disease, how it is diagnosed, how it is treated, and how to live with it.badge_kidney-disease-1

But not everything is working as I’d hoped it would. Unfortunately, I am still not having success in having Public Service Announcements placed on television or radio. Nor have I been able to interest most general magazines or newspapers in bringing the disease to the public’s awareness.

It hasn’t totally been a wipeout there, though. Michael Garcia did interview me on The Edge Podcast and both Nutrition Action Healthletter, Center for Science in the Public Interest (the nation’s largest-circulation nutrition newsletter) and New York State United Teachers (membership 600,000) ‘It’s What We Do’ profiled my work spreading CKD Awareness. Profiling my work, interviewing me, mentioning the blog all bring awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease to the public. Awareness leads to testing. Testing leads to diagnosing. Diagnosing leads to treatment. Treatment leads to saving lives. This is why I do what I can to spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease.

friendsWhat about you? Can you speak about CKD with your family? Your friends? Your co-workers? Your brothers and sisters in whichever religion you follow? What about your neighbors? I was surprised and delighted at the number of non CKD friends and neighbors who follow the blog. When I asked why they did, they responded, “I have a friend….” We may all have a friend who may have CKD, whether that friend has told us yet or not.

There are more formal methods of spreading this awareness if that interests you. The National Kidney Foundation has an Advocacy Network.

“A NKF Advocate is someone who has been affected by kidney disease, donation or transplant and who wants to empower and educate others. These include people NKF-logo_Hori_OBwith kidney disease, dialysis patients, transplant recipients, living donors, donor family members, caregivers, friends and family members.

Advocacy plays an integral role in our mission. You can make a significant difference in the lives of kidney patients by representing the National Kidney Foundation. We give you the tools you need to make your voice heard.”

You can read more about this program at https://www.kidney.org/node/17759 or you can call 1.800.622.9010 for more information.

The American Kidney Fund also has an advocacy program, but it’s a bit different.

“There is strength in numbers. More than 5,100 passionate patients, friends, loved ones and kidney care professionals in our Advocacy Network are making a huge AKF logodifference on Capitol Hill and in their own communities. Together, we are fighting for policies that improve care for patients, protect patients’ access to health insurance and increase funding for kidney research. As advocates, we play a key role in educating elected officials and our communities about the impact of kidney disease.”

You can register for this network online at http://www.kidneyfund.org/advocacy/advocate-for-kidney-patients/advocacy-network/

Obviously, I’m serious about doing that which will spread awareness of CKD. You can take a gander at my website, www.gail-raegarwood.com, to see if that sparks any ideas for you as to how you can start doing something about spreading awareness of CKD, too. I urge you to do whatever you can, wherever you can, and whenever you can.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

Starting the New Year with a Miracle

fireworksHappy New Year and welcome to 2017.  We did our usual stay in, watch movies, and toast with non-alcoholic champagne (I know that’s contradictory.) at midnight.  With our New York daughter here, it was even more meaningful.

A new year brings to mind new beginnings… and that leads me to Part 3 of the miracle series, as promised. I am so, so serious about this and hope you decide to take on for yourself causing a miracle in CKD by sharing information.

I was thinking about social media the other day. Where are the public service announcements about Chronic Kidney Disease?  I am still – nine years after my diagnose – knocking on seemingly closed doors to encourage Public Service Announcements everywhere. While the public doesn’t seem as involved with network television or radio as they were when I was younger, we now have Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Tumblr to name just a few ways we can share.

I use a both a Facebook page and a Twitter account to post one fact about or information pertinent to those with CKD daily. Join me at newslowitdownckdfbcoverSlowItDownCKD on Facebook and @SlowItDownCKD on Twitter. I also monitored Libre’s Tweet Chat with Gail Rae 1/10/12. I knew nothing about Twitter at the time, but it was a way to share the information I had. You may not want to do this, but feel free to ‘steal’ the information posted and share it with others.

There are also Podcasts, Internet Radio Shows, YouTubes, etc. to share what the public needs to know about CKD. A YouTube can be viewed by one person who posts it on Facebook and go viral. Don’t bother looking at mine. They’re pretty painful. I’ll look into this again at a later date.

On the other hand, these are some of the social media venues that interviewed me: The Edge

Podcast 5/9/16, Online with Andrea 3/23/15 & 3/07/12, What Is It? How Did I Get It? 2/17/12, and Improve Your Kidney Health with Dr. Rich Snyder, DO 11/21/11. I never knew these venues existed before I started working towards the miracle I wanted to cause.

Lo and behold, my sharing brought others who wanted to know about CKD, so I was profiled by Nutrition Action Healthletter, Center for Science in the Public Interest 9/16, New York State United Teachers ‘It’s What We Do’  8/9/16, and Wall Street Journal ‘Health Matters’  1/13/14. Remember that Clairol commercial in last week’s blog?

Let’s say you agree that sharing can cause a miracle in Chronic Kidney Disease and want to join in living a life causing this miracle. The first thing you’d want to do is learn about CKD. The American Kidney Fund and the National Kidney Foundation both have a wealth of information written AKF logofor the lay person, not the medical community. By the way, the National Kidney Foundation also has information about NKF-logo_Hori_OBCKD globally. Maybe you’d rather join in World Kidney Day gatherings and distribute materials. Then keep an eye on World Kidney Day’s Twitter account for locations around the world.

As you can see, I’ve been creating this miracle is by writing for these organizations and more kidney specific ones, as well as guest blogging for various groups. You may not choose to do that… but you can speak at your religious group meetings, your sports league, your weekly card game, or whatever other group you’re comfortable with.

A miracle doesn’t have to be profound. You can help create this one. All you need is a little education about CKD and the willingness to introduce the subject where you haven’t before.friends

I live my life expecting miracles and I find they happen.  This miracle that I’m causing – and is happening – has been (and is) created by sharing, sharing, sharing. The more than 200 million people who have Chronic Kidney Disease need this information, to say nothing of those who have yet to be diagnosed.

kidneys5There aren’t that many organs to go around for those who didn’t know they had CKD and progressed to End Stage Renal Disease.  We know that transplantation is a treatment, not a cure, and one that doesn’t always last forever. We also know that kidneys from living donors usually last longer than those from cadaver donors. Share that, too.

We have our no cost, no pain, no tools needed miracle right on our lips… or at our fingertips. Start sharing, keep sharing, urge others to share, and help to prevent or slow down the progression in the decline of kidneys worldwide. Sharing is causing a miracle in CKD. Both deaths and hospitalizations for this disease have declined since 2008. If that isn’t a miracle, I don’t know what is. I keep saying I live my life expecting miracles; this is one of them.hearing

I was a private person before this disease. Now, in addition to the Facebook page and twitter accounts, I make use of an Instagram account (SlowItDownCKD) where I post an eye catching picture daily with the hash tag #SlowItDownCKD. This brings people to my weekly blog about CKD – as does my Instagram account as Gail Rae-Garwood – and the four books I wrote about it: one explaining it and the others the blogs in print – rather than electronic form for those who don’t have a computer or are not computer savvy. Time consuming? Oh yes, but if I expect to live a life of miracles, I need to contribute that time to share what I can about the disease and urge others to do the same.IMG_2979

I am urging you to realize you are the others I am asking to help cause a miracle in Chronic Kidney Disease. As the Rabbinic sage Hillel the Elder said, “If I am not for myself, who will be for me? If I am only for myself, what am I? If not now, when?” Now. You. Me. Others. CKD.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Miracles Redux

Welcome to the last blog of 2016. I find it hard to believe another year has passed, although I do acknowledge that I’m a bit slower and more new-years-eve-celebrations-live-streamcontent to stay in my office to write rather than run around town. It’s a bit harder to maintain my body, although my mind is doing fine… as long as I don’t have to remember too much at once, that is. Well, my knees may have something to say, but I try to keep them happy with daily exercise and the braces.knee brace

I sincerely hope you enjoyed a joyous Christmas if you celebrate. And that you continue to enjoy Chanukah and Kwanzaa (which starts today) if you celebrate. We’ll be leaving for the Trans-Siberian Orchestra concert as soon as I finish the blog… a gift from us to us and one of the kids for Christmas. On Wednesday, we’ll have our Annual Chanukah Gathering. Our New York daughter will be with us since her Chanukah gift is a plane ticket. Being a two religion family, we celebrate both Chanukah and Christmas.

Before I get to more about creating a miracle, I am proud to announce that Healthline, a trusted health information site,  has named SlowItDownCKD one of The Best Kidney healthlineDisease Blogs of 2016. Talk about being surprised… and honored. Sort of a nice Christmas present, don’t you think? I suppose I can consider the publication of my novel, Portal in Time, my Chanukah present. I didn’t do too shabbily this year.

You know, it’s never too late to give either the novel or one of my Chronic Kidney Disease books as a present. Don’t forget you deserve presents, too.

Okay, on to more about miracles – or Part 2 – as I promised last week.

Unhealthy%20KidneyIf CKD were common knowledge, if those in high risk categories were aware of it, we might have a chance of preventing the disease in those who don’t have it yet and/or slowing down the progression of the decline in kidney function of those who have been already diagnosed.

Exactly how can we do that? On the most basic level, there’s the spoken word. It’s not just the medical community that can talk about the disease. I can as a patient. You can, too, because you know me and I’ve told you about the disease (and/or you suffer from CKD yourself).  This is most effective in areas of the world that do not have access to – or money for – doctors and treatment.  This is where we can prevent more and more of the disease by preventing more and more hypertension and diabetes.

If I tell you what I know about curtailing sodium intake in high blood pressure and you tell me what you know about smoking as it contributes to hypertension, we’ve just shared two important aspects in the prevention of high blood pressure. If I tell you what I know about sugar in diabetes Healthy%20Kidneyand you tell me what you know about carbohydrates and diabetes, we’ve just shared two important aspects in the prevention of diabetes. Then my husband starts sharing what he knows… and your third cousin once removed shares with her East Indian neighbor what her nephrologist told her… and your boss’s secretary shares what his boyfriend learned at his CKD awareness meeting, you’ve got a lot more people aware of what needs to be done about CKD. Sometimes causing a miracle is played out by sharing with people. Think of the miracle this kind of communication on a daily basis can cause.

The people you speak to will share with those they know, those they know will share with others they know until many, many hairmore people become aware of CKD – just as that long ago Clairol hair coloring ad demonstrated how telling someone who tells someone can go on ad infinitum. Simplistic? Yes, but it works…and that’s part of living the life of causing a miracle in CKD.

Then there’s the printed word. If people are aware of CKD books and newspapers, business and educational publications can alert their populations that the disease exists and is lethal, but may be prevented and/or slowed down. Most businesses have wellness components. What perfect vehicles to transform the world’s awareness of CKD.IMG_2979

For example: my four Chronic Kidney Disease books are sold in 106 countries. I have 107,000 readers. This in itself is a miracle, not just for me but for everyone who is in some way connected to the disease. It is not uncommon for one community member to buy the book, then share it with everyone else in their social circle. If there’s a library, the books can be ordered and then shared for free.

These are some of the pieces I’ve written: American Kidney Fund   “Slowing Down CKD –  It Can Be Done”  7/14/16, Dear Annie 10/14, KidneySteps  9/11/13  &  7/4/12, National Kidney Foundation 6/6/13, It Is What It Is 3/9/12, Kevinmd.com 1/1/12, Working with Chronic Illness 1/11/10, KidneyTimes 1/11/10. Bragging? No, just demonstrating it can be done… but I had to cause it to happen by knocking on doors.

I also share my information via this blog. A doctor in a remote village in India prints and translates it to share with whichever patient has the bus fare to make it to the clinic. That patient brings the translation back to his family, friends, neighbors, and whoever else he thinks may be interested. blood drawThis nephrologist’s view is the same as mine: We both need to live a life causing a miracle in Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness by sharing information. People who may not have known Chronic Kidney Disease exists now know via this sharing. Others who have undergone the simple blood and urine tests to diagnose the illness can share that the tests are not painful, other than the initial pinch of the needle for the blood draw. You would be surprised how many people, even in the high risk groups, don’t take the tests because they fear there will be pain involved. No sharing, no awareness. No awareness, no diagnose. No diagnose, no slowing down the disease.

Here are some of the blog and book mentions that have helped in my sharing of the information: Federal Register 9/25/13, The Neuropathy Doctor’s News 9/23/13, The NephCure Foundation 8/21/11, World’s Leading Expert.com 9/11/12, Glendale Community College Gaucho Gazette 8/22/11. These came about without my intervention. So what you share gets shared by others….

I’ve got some more thoughts, but we’ll have to leave them for Part 3 in the New Year. This blog is getting too long and my family is waiting for me.  Happy New Year to each and every one of you. Please be safe if you’re going out to celebrate.

Until next week and the New Year,

Keep living your life!

 

Starting My Day

Every day, I spend the morning doing ‘kidney work’ as I call it. That means looking for Chronic Kidney Disease related articles on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, and perusing the various medical newsletters to which I’ve subscribed. This takes a minimum of two hours. I also post something on most of these sites at as SlowItDownCKD.newckdfbcover

I noticed I’d been reading more and more about the plant based diet being good for CKD patients, so that’s what I posted on SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/SlowItDownCKD/on November 1. Then I started receiving emails from readers about it.

One was a very interesting, but undocumented, chart concerning how avoiding red meat lowers the risk of CKD. There was no title … and to make it worse, the reader – Cindy – couldn’t remember where she found it. She was frustrated; I was frustrated. So I did a little digging.

I started with a site that’s fast becoming one of my favorites – NephJC, a journal club. According to their website,

“It is the teaching session where trainees and teachers exchange roles. Journal Club is the area where the flipped classroom has been fully implemented in medical education. Read and study the article at home, and then use classroom time to critically debate the methods, results and interpretation of the article.”GFR

As both a former high school and college instructor, I can tell you this method of teaching seemed to have sparked some super creative thoughts in my classroom. Anyhoo, as they say, that’s where I found the chart. More specifically, it’s at http://www.nephjc.com/news/2016/8/17/red-meat-summary. Read the article. It’s got more information.

red-meat-chart

Cindy also mentioned that she lost so much weight – without being hungry – on the plant based diet that her nephrologist asked her to gain weight so that she wouldn’t “be at the bottom of BMI or below.” You know this grabbed my attention.

At the same time we were corresponding, another CKD Awareness Advocate posted in a private FB group (Hence, the reason he remains unnamed.) that in his last two nephrology labs, he raised his GFR something like eight or nine points and had nothing to attribute it to but changing to a plant based diet.FullSizeRender (2)

As a reminder, here’s the definition of GFR from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“Glomerular filtration rate [if there is a lower case “e” before the term, it means estimated glomerular filtration rate] which determines both the stage of kidney disease and how well the kidneys are functioning.”

Let’s look at this a little more closely. In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, I wrote a blog about the limited history of nephrology and included mention of the five stages of CKD. Basically, the higher your GFR, the better your kidneys are working. FullSizeRender (3)So this means the other advocate’s kidneys are functioning better now that he’s on a plant based diet. Why?

I turned to Dr. Greger’s NutritionFacts.org on YouTube for a better explanation than any I could offer. Dr. Greger is Michael Greger, described on NutritionFacts.org as:

“a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition, food safety, and public health issues. A founding member and Fellow of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, Dr. Greger is licensed as a general practitioner specializing in clinical nutrition. He is a graduate of the Cornell University School of Agriculture and Tufts University School of Medicine.”

NutritionFacts.org, while new to me, describes itself on its site as:

“a strictly non-commercial, science-based public service provided by Dr. Michael Greger, providing free updates on the latest in nutrition research via bite-sized videos. There are more than a thousand videos on nearly every aspect of healthy eating, with new videos and articles uploaded every day.”IMG_2982IMG_2980

I thoroughly enjoyed his analogy of overloading the kidneys with meat protein to that of constantly revving a car’s engine, especially since that’s the same analogy I used in my first CKD book.  He also mentions inflammation as a contributing cause of lower GFR. I’m glad I’ve discovered his website and intend to take a closer look at it…just not now.

Now I’m really interested in going back to Cindy’s comment about losing weight on the plant based diet. I wanted to know – what else? – why. I spent most of yesterday researching. The consensus seems to be that not having to count calories or portion control may have something to do with it.  Then again, maybe it’s the lack of cookies, cakes, and candies. The few medical studies I did find were far too complicated for me to understand, much less explain. Are there any readers out there who can help? I have one particular reader in mind and hope that she will immediately respond.

Let’s see if I can do any better with finding out why the nephrologist of the reader I’m corresponding with doesn’t want her to “be at the bottom of BMI or below.” Aha! A study by US National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26920126 suggests that “that combined effects of low BMI … and serum albumin level … are associated with CKD progression.”

NIHMaybe we should take a look at “serum albumin level.” Serum means it’s the clear part of your blood, the part without red or white blood cells. This much is fairly common knowledge. Albumin is not. Medlineplus, part of The National Institutes of Health’s U.S. National Library of Medicine at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003480.htm tells us, “Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.” Uh-oh, this is also not good: a high level of serum albumin indicates progression of your kidney disease. Conversely, kidney disease can cause a high level of serum albumin.

Even with yesterday’s research, this blog has taken quite a while to complete … and not just because I was doing the wash while I wrote it, or because I was enjoying having the window to my right open as I wrote. I can see this becoming several additional blogs… if there’s reader interest.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Updates, Anyone?

FullSizeRender (2)Several months ago, an Arizona reader asked me to meet her for lunch to talk over her Chronic Kidney Disease journey and mine. I was open to the idea and glad to be able to share ideas with each other. Uh-oh, during the conversation, while trying to share my iPhone apps with her, I discovered that one of those I use to help me is no longer available to new installers. That got me to thinking about what else may have changed in the CKD electronic world.

Time to back track just a bit. I have an iPhone and look for apps for those. Many of the apps I looked at are also available for Androids, iPads, and iPod Touch. According to GCFLearnFree.org – a program of Goodwill Community Foundation® and Goodwill Industries of Eastern NC Inc.® (GIENC®)  – at http://www.gcflearnfree.org/computerbasics/understanding-applications/1/,

“Simply put, an app is a type of software that allows you to perform specific tasks. Applications for desktop or laptop computers are sometimes called desktop applications, while those for mobile devices are called mobile apps.”

During an internet search, I found that NephCure which provides “detailed information about the diseases that cause Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) and Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS)” (and was one of the first organizations to interview me about CKD, by the way) – at http://nephcure.org/livingwithkidneydisease/managing-your-care/kidney-health-tracking-tools/helpful-mobile-apps/ was way ahead of me in discussing apps. This is what’s on their website:

Diet and Nutrition Apps

  • 02-77-6660_ebe_myfoodcoachappKidneyAPPetite– Gives daily summaries of key nutrients for kidney health, check the nutritional value of foods before you eat it, and provides printable summaries to refer to. Great for patients on a renal diet! Cost: Free,  Device: iOS
  • Pocket Dietitian– Created by a Nephrologist, allows you to choose your health conditions and dietary restrictions to see recommended foods as well as keep track of what you have eaten. You can even see your past nutrition in graph form. Cost: Free,  Device: iOS and Android
  • My Food Coach– is designed to help you understand and manage all of your nutritional requirements. This app offers personalized nutrition information, recipes and meal plans. Cost: Free,  Device: iOS and Android
  • HealthyOut– Enables you to search and order nearby healthy food and browse for healthy options while out to eat. You can even choose a specific diet such as gluten free! Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

kidneyapp

  • Restaurant Nutrition– Allows you to search restaurants and look at nutritional values, locate nearby restaurants, and keep a food journal. The Restaurant Nutrition application shows nutritional information of restaurant foods. Cost: Free, Device: iOS and Android

While I could easily go to most of the apps’ websites by clicking on the name while I held down the control button, this was not the case with Pocket IMG_2982Dietician. I was able to find it and lots of descriptive information about it in the Google Play store, but kept getting the message that I had no devices. The help function on the site was not helpful.

I have KidneyAPPetite on my phone, but keep using KidneyDiet instead. It keeps track of the 3 Ps (protein, potassium, and the one missing from food labels: phosphorous), sodium, calories, carbohydrates, cholesterol, and fat, and fluid intake. The very nice part of the app? You can add the foods you eat that are not on the food list provided. Unfortunately, this is the one I mentioned in the first paragraph. This is what’s presently on their website:

The KidneyDiet® app is no longer being sold or supported. It, and all your data, will continue to reside on your device unless you delete it.

Thank you for your patronage. We hope KidneyDiet® has helped you.

Sincerely,
The KidneyDiet® Team

FullSizeRender (3)I consider this a great loss for those looking for a simple nutritional app for their CKD.

What about My Food Coach? It has an extra feature that my favorite lacked: a warning when a recipe would bring you over your renal diet limits. It’s recipe oriented, which doesn’t endear it to me since I like to experiment cooking my big five ounces of protein daily with my three different size servings of different fruits that are on my renal diet. I also avoid red meat.

HealthyOut, while not specifically for CKD, does have a function for the Mediterranean diet which is more often than not recommended for us. I thought this was a hoot since it never occurred to me that you can check restaurant foods by the restaurant name. I am adding this app to my iPhone.

Restaurant Nutrition is another app offered by Google Play, which means I can’t even get into it. I did get through to the reviews and couldn’t find any positive ones. I didn’t see the point in pursuing this any further.IMG_2980

There are even kidney disease games, such as KidneyWarrior, to teach yourself and your loved ones about your disease. This is the author’s description of the game:

“A new hero emerges to fight a dreadful illness. A quest to save his father. A brand NEW approach to mobile gaming •Play as Glo, a young hero on his exciting adventure to save his father •SHOOT, SMACK, and SPIN your way through 3 different and exciting stages, packed with hours of gaming •LEARN about what kidneys do and how kidney disease affects people worldwide Created on behalf of Project ARK, an organization focused to support research efforts on combating kidney disease. As a high school organization, Project ARK seeks to raise awareness on campus and within the community.”

To borrow a term from a now defunct cigarette brand: We’ve come a long way, baby!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Not Your New Age Crystals

Sometimes, a reader will ask a question and I’ll research the answer for him/her, always explaining first that I’m not a doctor, don’t claim to be one, and (s)he will need to check whatever information I offer with his/her nephrologist before acting on it. There was just such a comment this week: “Just wondering if you have any advice on Gout and it’s effect on Kidney disease? Mary.” Advice? No. Research? Yes.

What is itLet’s establish just what gout is first. This is how it’s defined in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease :

“gout: particularly painful form of inflammatory arthritis characterized by a build-up of urate crystals in the joints, causing pain and inflammation.”

Urate crystals? MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=11853 defines these as: “… salt derived from uric acid. When the body cannot metabolize uric acid properly, urates can build up in body tissues or crystallize within the joints.”

Okay, what’s uric acid then? Thanks to the Merriam Webster Online Dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/uric%20acid for the definition:

URIC ACID: a white odorless and tasteless nearly insoluble acid C5H4N4O3 that is the chief nitrogenous waste present in the urine especially of lower vertebrates (as birds and reptiles), is present in small quantity in human urine, and occurs pathologically in renal calculi {A little help here: this means a concretion usually of mineral salts around organic material found especially in hollow organs or ducts} and the tophi of gout.”

Whoops, looks like I missed a definition here: tophi simply means the deposit itself.

You may be wondering what that has to do with Chronic Kidney Disease.  This paragraph from The IMG_2982Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 explains:

“Researching that brought me to an English article from Arthritis Research UK which cited an American study.  I’m going to reproduce only one paragraph of the article here because it brought home exactly what gout with Chronic Kidney Disease can do to your body.

‘The findings were presented at Kidney Week 2011 by researcher Dr Erdal Sarac. He concluded: ‘This study reveals a high prevalence of gout in patients with CKD. Male sex, advanced age, CAD, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with gout among CKD patients.’”

You may need some more definitions to fully understand that paragraph, so I’m reproducing these from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

CAD: coronary artery disease

hyperlipidemia: high cholesterol

hypertension: high blood pressure

Gout sounds bad. I’ll bet you’re wondering how you can help avoid gout… especially if you have CKD. Let’s go back to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 for a moment.

“One disease, CKD, can be implicated for three others if you also have gout.  … I didn’t know that gout is also somehow in the mix of being medically compromised.  I have hyperlipidemia and hypertension and CKD.  True, I’m not an older male but should I become more vigilant about any hints of gout? ….

bottled waterI would have to be careful about my food and beverage intake. Oh, wait, I’m already doing that by following the renal diet. In both, you are urged to cut back on alcohol and drink more water instead. Purines are a problem, too, but then again I am limited to five ounces of protein {A purine food source} per day. Hmmm, avoiding sugar-sweetened drinks may help. Say, with CKD, I have to watch my A1C {How the body handles glucose or sugar in a three month period} so that I don’t end up with diabetes.  That means I’m watching all my sugar intake already. I see fructose rich fruits can be a problem.  But I’m already restricted to only three servings of fruit a day!  Oh, here’s the biggie: lose weight.  Yep, been hearing that from my nephrologist for four (Me here: it’s more like nine years now.) years.  To sum up, by attending to my CKD on a daily basis, I’m also attempting to avoid or lessen the effects of gout.

This is getting very interesting.  I also take medication for both hypertension and hyperlipidemia.  Are they also helping me to avoid gout?  It seems to me that by treating one condition {Or two in my case}, I’m also treating my CKD and possibly preventing another.  It is all inter-related.”

By the way, based upon another reader’s question I mentioned cherries and gout in The Book of FullSizeRender (3)Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“From my reading, I’ve also garnered the information that cherries can help with iron deficiencies, lower blood pressure, improve sleep, help with gout, and lower the risk of heart disease.

Or can they? Remember that too much potassium can actually cause an irregular heartbeat or possibly stop your heart.”

So now, we need to watch purines and potassium, too. Aha! Following the renal diet already is helping to avoid potassium. What about purines? According to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/arthritis/tc/diet-and-gout-topic-overview:

“Purines (specific chemical compounds found in some foods) are broken down into uric acid. A diet rich in purines from certain sources can raise uric acid levels in the body, which sometimes leads to gout. Meat and seafood may increase your risk of gout. Dairy products may lower your risk.”cherries

It seems to me a small list of high purine foods is appropriate here. Gout Education at http://gouteducation.org/patient/gout-treatment/diet/ offers just that. This also appears to be an extremely helpful site for those wanting to know more about gout.

“Because uric acid is formed from the breakdown of purines, high-purine foods can trigger attacks. It is strongly encouraged to avoid:

  • Beer and grain liquors
  • Red meat, lamb and pork
  • Organ meats, such as liver, kidneys and sweetbreads
  • Seafood, especially shellfish, like shrimp, lobster, mussels, anchovies and sardines”

Does this list sound familiar? It should if you’re following the renal diet. While not exactly the same, there’s quite a bit of overlap in the two diets.

Mary… and every other reader… I hope this was enough information for you to write a list of questions about CKD and gout to bring to your next nephrology appointment.

IMG_2980Until next week,

Keep living your life!

What’s Your Type?

Every Sunday night, I take a blues dance lesson taught by my daughter, Abby Wegerski, as Sustainable Blues Phoenix at Saint Nick’s Tavern and SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)stay to dance to the music of the live band – the Rockets 88s – for a while. Last week, my good buddy, Karla Lodge, organized a fund raiser. I like to support Karla in whatever she does, so I decided to push myself and go to the fundraiser (a half hour drive each way) after dancing.

To make it even more fun, Bill Weber, the creator of Avery’s World, was in from Los Angeles visiting a relative in Tucson. They drove up to Scottsdale to join us at the fundraiser.  Now that you’ve been introduced to some of the people and events in my life, forget them. Here’s the important part: as we were having dinner, my Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Advocacy came up. Bill’s relative lit up. It turns out Avery's Worldsomeone very close to her is a transplantee. Her first question to me: What’s your blood type?

I explained I was in the moderate stages of CKD and not anywhere near transplant, but she insisted it was very important to know your blood type when you have CKD. She didn’t know why. I didn’t know why…so that’s the subject of today’s blog.

Here I am starting in the middle again. We all have a blood type.  That’s fairly common knowledge, but what exactly are blood drawblood types? We’ll go about this a bit differently by defining blood group, which is a synonym for blood type. To paraphrase a song we used to sing during the two times I went to a two week stint at summer camp on a farm, “I know because the dictionary tells me so.” In this case it’s the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blood%20group:

“one of the classes (as those designated A, B, AB, or O) into which individuals or their blood can be separated on the basis of the presence or absence of specific antigens in the blood —called also blood type

What is itFor those of you who are wondering, an antigen is something that’s introduced to the body and causes the body to produce antibodies (think germs). As an undergraduate in good old Hunter College of The City University of New York I learned that ‘anti’ is a prefix meaning against. ‘Gen’ is a root which means causing something to happen.  Got it. An antigen causes something to happen against something else. In this case, your red blood cells.

4I see a hand raised in the back of the room. (This does remind me of when I was teaching college out here in Arizona.) Why are there four types you ask? Good question. Anyone have the answer? I don’t either, so let’s look it up together. Look! The Smithsonian Institute sums it up in one sentence: “But why humans and apes have these blood types is still a scientific mystery.” Now I don’t feel so uninformed that I couldn’t answer the question. Anyway, you can read more at: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-mystery-of-human-blood-types-86993838/#JwJKP357AyhDRy4R.99 and, yes, this is THAT Smithsonian Institute.  Where, oh where, is Bones when you need her?Bones-tv-show-f38

Did you know there are numerous other blood groups, too? Usually people don’t – unless they happen to be a member of one of them. The same link above can offer you more information about these since we’ll be sticking to the four major ones today. You should know that your blood type is inherited.

Again, why is it important to know your blood group?  Thank you to Disabled World at http://www.disabled-world.com/calculators-charts/blood-chart.php for the following chart, which demonstrates the answer.

blood-donor-match

They also offer a simple explanation of why blood groups are so important:

“Blood types are very important when a blood transfusion is necessary. In a blood transfusion, a patient must receive a blood type compatible with his or her own blood type. If the blood types are not compatible, red blood cells will clump together, making clots that can block blood vessels and cause death.

blood_test_vials_QAIf two different blood types are mixed together, the blood cells may begin to clump together in the blood vessels, causing a potentially fatal situation. Therefore, it is important that blood types be matched before blood transfusions take place. In an emergency, type O blood can be given because it is most likely to be accepted by all blood types. However, there is still a risk involved.”

As a CKD patient for the last nine years, I have never needed a blood transfusion. Come to think of it, I’ve never needed one in my almost 70 years on this planet. But that’s not to say I may not need one sometime in the future… or that you might not need one. But I’m interested in why it’s especially important to know your blood type as a moderate stage CKD patient.

I scoured What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease – Part 1, The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease – Part 2, and SlowItDownCKD 2015. Although there is abundant discussion of how the kidneys filter the blood, why their effectiveness in this filtering diminishes in CKD and the production of red blood cells, there is no mention of blood type in any of the books.

IMG_1398

I’m beginning to wonder if Bill’s relative meant that knowing your blood type is important in general, not especially if you have CKD. Karla, a Physician’s Assistant, was strangely quiet during this part of the discussion. I attributed that to her being pre-occupied with the fundraiser she was running… maybe that wasn’t the reason.

questionAlthough I didn’t find the answer to my question, I did run across some intriguing theories during my research. I’m not endorsing them since I know so little about them, simply offering you the information.

The Blood Type Diet at http://www.dadamo.com/ (I do remember a colleague being interested in this one about a decade ago.)

Blood Type and Your Personality at http://bodyecology.com/articles/link_blood_type_personality_diet.php

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Sex Sells… Well, It Keeps Us Interested Anyway

National Kidney MonthHappy Monday, blog writing day, my favorite day of the week.  You know, this is the third week of National Kidney Month which brings quite a bit of kidney disease awareness activity with it. For example, this past Friday and Saturday, The National Kidney Foundation of Arizona held its 17th annual conference in partnership with The CadioRenal Society of America.

I attended on Friday, renal day, since Saturday – cardio day – was a bit too over my head. I had the good luck to run right into Dr. James Ivie, Director of Patient Services, as soon as I entered the building. After I apologized for not having a book for him this year (SlowItDowCKD 2015 is available in digital, but the print version won’t be ready until later on this month.), he told me how very successful the conference was this year, easily surpassing the number of attendees from the year before.

He was so right. I could see for myself that the place was crowded and people were talking. More than one vendor was more interested in my CKD writing than in selling me their product. I was surprised, but delighted. Then I started attending the sessions and found the same with other attendees and, again, was delighted.Kidney Arizona

But what delighted me most was how much I understood.  You see, the more I understood, the more I could bring back to you. As usual, presenter styles varied from the one who simply read the statistics on her slideshow graphs for us to the one who told anecdotes, asked for audience participation, and had us both laughing and highly interested.

Her topic?  Enhancing Intimacy and Sexuality. Her name? Robin Siegel. She is a licensed clinical social worker. Learn.org at http://learn.org/articles/What_Does_LCSW_Stand_For.html tells us “An LCSW, or licensed clinical social worker, is a professional who provides counseling and psychosocial services to clients in clinical settings.”

Ms. Siegel was actually presenting about how nephrology staff can be helpful in these areas, but quite a bit of her information was also useful for Chronic Kidney Disease patients themselves… or those that write about CKD.

Hmmm, her ideas sounded familiar to me. Sure enough, it seems I had been thinking along the same lines when I wrote the following in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

Book Cover“I haven’t found too much about sex that’s different from the problems of non-CKD patients although with this disease there may be a lower sex drive accompanied by a loss of libido and an inability to ejaculate. Usually, these problems start with an inability to keep an erection as long as usual.  The resulting impotency has a valid physical, psychological or psycho-physical cause…..

The usual remedies for E.D. can be used with CKD patients, too, but you need to make certain your urologist and your nephrologists work together, especially if your treatment involves changing medications, hormone replacement therapy or an oral medication like Viagra. …

Women with CKD may also suffer from sexual problems, but the causes can be complicated.  As with men, renal disease, diabetes and hypertension may contribute to the problem.  But so can poor body image, low self-esteem, depression, stress and sexual abuse. Any chronic disease can make a man or a woman feel less sexual.”

Ms. Siegel added to this by talking about possible medical intervention traumas, cultural values, and gender issues. What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was written in 2010, although it was published in 2011. Transgender was hardly, if ever, mentioned in the news – medical or otherwise. It was almost the same for homosexuality. It’s a different world in 2016. We talk openly about sexuality. Well, let’s say many of us do. I really liked the way this presenter made it clear that these are simply part of some patients’ lives and must be treated respectfully, especially when dealing specifically with their sexuality.IMG_2867

We agreed about intimacy, too. More from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“Sometimes people with chronic diseases can be so busy being the patient that they forget their partners have needs, too.        And sometimes, remembering to stay close, really close as in hugging and snuggling, can be helpful….  The best advice I received in this area was make love even if you don’t want to.  Magic.”

Those last thoughts are purely mine, but Ms. Siegel did talk about the snuggling and hugging from a patient point of view: allowing, giving, getting.

Something else she introduced was the different cultural values in our present day society. That’s another thing that wasn’t as publicly prevalent as it is today. For example, certain cultures will not permit a male doctor if the patient is female. If you belong to one of these cultures, you can simply ask for a female nephrologist in the practice or for a referral to another practice with female nephrologists if yours doesn’t have any. (What???  In this day and age!!!!) According to one of my Muslim friends, there is a list of female doctors, including specialists, available in her community.

Other cultures will not allow eye contact. This is important for you to let your nephrologist know about so that he or she will not think you are avoiding topics if this is part of your culture. Sometimes written material such as handouts and pamphlets can allow you access to the same information you would have been told, too.

It seemed to me that Robin Siegel was making clear that there is no problem that can’t be attended to by your nephrologist or his/her staff – even sex and intimacy – with just a bit of adapting to whatever the patient’s (Oh, that means you and me.) sexuality and culture.

IMG_1398

I have been receiving all kinds of laudatory comments about The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 since SlowItDownCKD 2015 was published in digital last week. I like how that works: publish a new book and there’s renewed interest in your others. Feel free to write reviews on any and all of my four CKD books.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Still Getting Birthday Gifts… like OAB

happy birthdayBear has just spoiled me and spoiled me for this birthday. It was not a special birthday, just a birthday. His reasoning, “I’m celebrating being with you for another year.” Which, of course, made me think. My first thought? I realized how much I liked being adored by the man I love.

My second?  Time changes things.  Your weight changes.  Your hair color changes.  Even your height changes. There are those that say aging is a problem. I say if you’re aging, you’re alive so it’s not a problem, but rather something to which you need to adapt.

Part of the birthday celebration was an overnight at The Desert Rose Bed and Breakfast in Cottonwood. The place was unique. They house animals they’ve rescued: llamas, cats, chickens. I thought the llamas were the most picture worthy, but then I’d never seen the kind of fluffed out rooster they had. Up the hill was a goat farm. For a city woman like me, this was heaven.

Except – there was this – there were no hand rails on the steep path from the house to the animals. Nor were there steps. The runoff from a recent hose cleaning of some apparatus near the house caused the loose gravel covered road to be slick. So we took teeny little ‘old person’ steps while the owner, a young woman possibly in her thirties, practically scampered. We got to see the animals, but we had to adapt how we got to them due to our age related capabilities.llama

The private bath was another eye opener for me. Bear opted for the room with the spa. It was so relaxing and could have even been romantic except that there were no grab rails. We slipped, we fell, we worried if Bear broke his foot.  But it was supposed to be romantic!

Oh well. There was also the kind of shower I’d only seen in magazines.  You know the kind that could easily fit six people (uh, not my style) with two separate shower heads – one on each end of the shower. This was a new toy for me, until the floor got wet. Again, no grab rails. There was no safety mat on the shower floor, either. So we tried to hold on to the walls. Hah! They were tile that was just as slippery.

You get the point?  This was a beautiful, romantic, upscale bathroom… and wasted on us because there were no safety features to accommodate our gifts from aging. Of course, not everyone would have felt this way, but we each have neuropathy which can make balancing difficult.

shoqweIn addition to grab bars in our at home bathrooms, we have no area rugs anywhere in the house. This is to cut down on the possibility of tripping. When our primary care doctor suggested ways to prevent injuring ourselves, we listened. Bear’s time flat on his back after his foot surgery convinced us we never wanted to go through that again. For me, with my ‘age related’ macular degeneration, we also use ultra-bright LED bulbs throughout the house.

Okay, so where am I going with this? I’m circling in on the kidneys via urination. Remember the kidneys produce urine which is stored in the bladder.  I wanted to know what was usual for people ‘our age’ and why. After all, I’d made the bathrooms as safe as possible understanding that one or the other of us was going to get up during the night to urinate.

I turned to The Cleveland Clinic at http://health.clevelandclinic.org/2015/12/stop-full-bladder-killing-sleep/ for some help.

“If you’re urinating more than eight times in 24 hours, that’s too much. A lot depends on your age. And if you’re between age 65-70 and going more than twice a night, you should make an appointment with your doctor. Also, see a doctor if you are getting up more than once a night if you are between age 60-65, and more than three times each night if you are age 70 or older. While your bladder’s capacity does not necessarily decrease with age, the prevalence of overactive bladder increases with age.”

Apparently, an overactive bladder may also lead to increased falls. Not fair! We’re already dealing with the neuropathy to avoid this. Oh, right. “…if you’re aging, you’re alive so it’s not a problem, but rather something to which you need to adapt.”detrusor

I wonder if aging is a factor because the detrusor (bladder muscle) ages right along with the rest of you.  A long time ago, I explained that my Chronic Kidney Disease was caused by nothing more than growing older. I hate to admit it, but it does make sense. All of you ages when you age, not just certain parts.

What is itBirthday giveaway for What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease! All you have to do to win is be one of the first three people to enter the contest and follow SlowItDownCKD on Twitter. Here’s link to enter for a chance to win: https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/542abbec7a52e10a#ln-fo

I hope you’re keeping an eye on P2P’s Chronic Illness Buy and Sell’s contest. I’ll be gifting a copy of one of my Chronic Kidney Disease Books to three different winners.  Each winner will receive a different book. This one started February 1st and runs until St. Valentine’s Day.  Here’s the address: http://www.facebook.com/groups/P2PBuy.Sell. You do need to be a member of the group, tag yourself in a comment below the announcement of the contest, and be involved with kidney disease as a patient or caretaker.

My accountant (Yep, working on those this week.) thinks I’m nuts to be part of so many giveaways and contests, but my mission… no, my passion… is to get information about Chronic Kidney Disease out to as many people as I can, in as many ways as I can, for as long as I can.

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To that end, Phoenix area readers, please let me know if you are interested in joining Team SlowItDownCKD for this year’s kidney walk at Chase Stadium on Sunday, April 17.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Good Enough 

Yesterday, I carefully applied my eye liner, examined myself in the magnifying mirror, nodded to myself and murmured, “Good enough.” I’ve been saying that an awful lot lately and finally realized – once a valued, constant reader asked about the connection between worsening vision and Chronic Kidney Disease – that it may be due to my CKD.

This, after I’ve spent years attributing “Good enough” to the slowest developing ever case of macular degeneration,  the age related need for reading glasses, and my impatience with makeup. Of course, then I remembered that I couldn’t read a darned thing without the reading glasses and, that without ample light, even they didn’t do the trick.eye liner

Back to the drawing board, ladies and gentlemen. Here’s what DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/symptoms-and-diagnosis/eyes-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/4732 has to say about CKD and vision.

Diabetes and high blood pressure aren’t only the leading causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD). They’re also the leading causes of eye disease and loss of vision. If your renal disease is a result of either condition your vision may be at risk.

Some of the most common eye problems that occur in CKD patients are retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma.”

Here are some quickie reminders before we continue. The American Diabetes Association at http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/  tells us, “Diabetes is a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce and/or use insulin.”

Book CoverI turned to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney for a reminder about high blood pressure: “A possible cause of CKD, 140/90mm Hg is currently considered hypertension, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, too.”

However, the American Heart Association has changed this a bit as of Dec. 2013. “The American Heart Association maintains its recommendation of initiating treatment — starting with lifestyle changes and then medication if necessary — at 140/90 until age 80, then at 150/90.” Yet, The Journal of the American Medical Association maintains that people over 60 should not be considered hypertensive until they register 150/90.

While that’s not new information to me, I did wonder how hypertension could affect your sight. The American Academy of Ophthalmology at http://www.aao.org/eye-health/ask-eye-md-q/how-does-high-blood-pressure-affect-vision came to the rescue here.

“If the blood pressure is very high it can be called malignant hypertension and cause swelling of the macula and acute loss of vision. Otherwise hypertension can cause progressive constriction of the arterioles in the eye and other findings. Usually high blood pressure alone will not affect vision much, however hypertension is a known risk factor in the onset and/or progression of other eye disease such as glaucomadiabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration as well as blocked veins and arteries in the retina or nerve of the eye that can severely affect vision.”

My first response to this information was, “What’s an arteriole? A small artery?”  Time to find out. I turned to my old friend MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2335 for the definition.arteriole in eye

“A small branch of an artery that leads to a capillary. The oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyhemoglobin) makes the blood in arterioles (and arteries) look bright red.”

That makes sense.  Do you remember what glaucoma and/or macular degeneration are?

Back to another trusted source for one of the definitions: The Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/glaucoma/basics/definition/con-20024042.

“Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, which is vital to good vision. This damage is often caused by an abnormally high pressure in your eye.”

I sort of, maybe, remembered writing about macular generation in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2.Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy Sure enough, I found it.

“An eye disease that progressively destroys the macula, the central portion of the retina, impairing central vision. Macular degeneration rarely causes total blindness because only the center of vision is affected.” (according to MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=10027). Oh, MedicineNet again.  That’s a good source for easily understood medical definitions if you’re looking for one.

Let’s say you don’t have diabetes or hypertension.  Does CKD affect your vision then?  Interestingly enough, most sites I pulled up talked more about CKD being caught during an eye exam than CKD causing vision problems… except in diabetic End Stage Renal Disease.  This is when you need to have your eyes carefully checked and often.

PubMed, part of the US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21784818 puts a bit of a different spin on the vision/CKD exploration. “Retinal abnormalities are common in inherited and acquired renal disease.”

journal_logoWow! This is from an older study – 2011 – conducted by the well-respected Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.  I don’t know if my CKD is inherited or acquired, but it is renal disease and I do have vision problems… and so does my valued, constant reader.

By the way, blurred vision may be an indication that you are suffering from uremia. This reminder brought to you by the Renal Network’s Kidney Patient News at http://www.kidneypatientnews.org/ckd/index.php.

Of course, I can almost hear some of you asking what uremia is.  The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 was DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILof help here: it’s “the buildup of waste in the blood due to kidney failure.”

I really enjoy learning from the research I do to answer your questions, so thank you for another opportunity to do that. Just keep in mind that I’m not a doctor and you need to ask these questions of your nephrologist who will answer them or refer you to another specialist if need be.

Another birthday approaches – which I consider another opportunity to give you gifts.  Keep your eye on P2P’s Chronic Illness Awareness Buy and Sell’s page on Facebook and SlowItDownCKD on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram in addition to this blog for Book Give- Away announcements.happy birthday

Last but not least, The  17th Annual Southwest Nephrology Conference and 4th Annual Convention of Cardio Renal Society of America will be held right here in Arizona at the We-Ko-Pa Resort & Conference Center in Scottsdale. The dates are March 11-12. I’ll be attending part of the time. Why not meet me? Register at www.swnc.org or by calling 1 (877) 587-1357.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

It’s the Funniest Thing…

You want to know about Chronic Kidney Disease brain fog?  Let me tell you about Chronic Kidney Disease brain fog.  I wrote a book about the Book Coverexperiences of the newly diagnosed CKD patient based upon my own experience – What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.  Nice job on that one, Gail.

Four years later, I published The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Parts 1 & 2… with neither a topic listed for each blog nor an index. Well, how the heck are you supposed to find the information you’re looking for??? And it’s taken me this long to figure that out. Take it from me, CKD brain fog exists.

So, what is this CKD brain fog of which I speak? According to integrative medicine expert Dr. Isaac Eliaz, when experiencing brain fog:

“…people feel as if there is a thick fog dampening their mind. While the medical and mental health establishments don’t generally recognize brain fog as a condition, it’s a surprisingly common affliction that affects people of all ages. Symptoms include pervasive absentmindedness, muddled thought processes, poor memory recall, difficulty processing information, disorientation, fatigue, and others.”

You can read more at http://www.rodalenews.com/brain-fog.

It was www.naturopathconnect.com (a link that sometimes works, sometimes doesn’t) that offered me my first insight into how our kidneys and brain fog are connected.

bottled water“Make sure your liver and kidneys are not overloaded or congested. When your liver and kidneys are not functioning well, they are less able to clear your system of the multitude of toxins that float around in your bloodstream. When your body is overloaded with toxins, your brain suffers as well….Dehydration may be a key factor in less-than-optimal kidney function, so water is essential to keep the kidneys in tip-top shape.”

Got it – toxins.  Uh, what toxins?  And how do they affect the brain, I wondered.  Back to researching.

Dr. Martin Morrell of healthtap.com offered an explanation. However, this is not an endorsement of him or the site.  I am not a fan of asking online doctors unfamiliar with your particular medical history for advice.

“… if your blood urea increases, which is supposed to be cleared by your kidneys, this ‘poison’ will affect the ability of the brain to work properly.”

Oh, blood urea. Well that explains it. But how can I explain blood urea?  I’ll allow the experts to do that.

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/routine-kidney-function-blood-test has the simplest explanation.

“Urea is a waste product formed from the breakdown of proteins. Urea is usually passed out in the urine. A high blood level of urea (‘uraemia’) indicates that the kidneys may not be working properly, or that you are dehydrated (have a low body water content).”

In the U.S., we call this test B.U.N. or Blood Urea Nitrogen Blood Test.  So as I understand it, if your protein intake is high, more urea is produced.  But since your kidneys are already compromised by CKD, the toxins remaining in your body are not eliminated as well and are still in the blood that flows through your brain.  Okay, that’s logical.protein

The more urea remaining in your system, the more sluggish your brain.  It does sound like a perfectly formed ‘if-then’ equation from probability theory. The only difference here is that this is not a theory, but, rather, what we may encounter as CKD patients.

What to do?  What to do?  Obviously, keeping our protein intake low will help.  My renal diet limits me to five ounces of protein a day. I rarely ingest more protein than that. Well, bully for me!

So how else can I alleviate my sometimes brain fog…especially since I’m working on three books at the same time as well as wanting to make some sort of index for the books mentioned above?

I was all over the web on this one and found that besides what I was already doing for my CKD, I could also avoid heavy metal (and I always thought that was a kind of music) exposure, use a blue light, get myself some natural sun light, check my medication side effects and lots more.

Dr. Isaac Eliaz who wrote the RodaleNews article in 2013 suggests several more natural remedies:

  1. Improve your diet and digestion.
  2. Detoxify.
  3. Support cell power.water to cells
  4. Control stress.
  5. Exercise.

I can agree with most of the items on Dr. Eliaz’s list no matter what’s causing the brain fog, but with CKD I’d talk over detoxing and/or taking supplements to support cell power with my nephrologist before actually following that advice.  Some nephrologists are dead (Yikes! Wrong word choice) set against detoxifying while others have a more eclectic approach to gentle detoxifying.

Supplements are a whole other story. There are so many different approaches here that I usually research whichever supplement I’m considering, then bring that research to my nephrologist to talk it over with him. Result: some supplements I agreed weren’t looking so good for me after our talk; others, he agreed were well worth a try.

Bahar Gholipour of Live Science at http://www.livescience.com/45502-foggy-brain-causes.html writes about other possible causes of brain fog. She includes multi-tasking, pregnancy, chemotherapy, menopause, and chronic fatigue syndrome among the causes. If any one of these causes exists in your life, maybe it’s not CKD brain fog you’re experiencing… or maybe it is… or maybe it’s a combination.  No one seems to be certain just what can cause brain fog, although I’m pretty comfortable with the explanations I’ve offered above.

It’s real.  Brain fog could be affecting you, especially if you have CKD.  And from what I’ve read, once you’ve gotten your CKD slowed down as much as possible, the other ‘fixes’ are easy.Kidney Arizona

Here’s a quick reminder about The National Kidney Fund of Arizona’s Path to Wellness screening on Saturday, September 19, 2015 at the Indo American Cultural Center. This consists of free blood and urine testing, which is evaluated onsite to assess for the risk of diabetes, heart and kidney diseases, and chronic disease management education, plus overall health assessment and one-on-one consultation with a physician for the screenees. A follow-up 6-week series of Healthy Living workshops that teach chronic disease self-management skills is then offered.

Just like last week, one last thing: P2P’s Chronic Illness Buy & Sell page is on Facebook IMG_1398at https://www.facebook.com/groups/P2PBuy.Sell/.  It will be the place to go for anything chronic illness related. My first book is advertised there and both The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease books will be soon, too.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

We Are Not Alone, Unfortunately

I have a friend who keeps telling me that Chronic Kidney Disease is not as widespread as I think it is and that I should stop scaring people by telling them it is. My usual way is to present facts, but not argue. In this case, I found myself arguing which made me wonder if I could be wrong.  Why protest so vehemently if I were sure I was right?

And that’s what today’s blog is about. First, you should know this has nothing to do with whether my friend is right, or if I am. It’s bigger than that… a lot bigger.

How big? Well, let’s start with the United States of America.  This diagram is from The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/Pages/kidney-disease-statistics-united-states.aspx.

ckd

I don’t want to scare you too, but 2008 was seven years ago.  How much more has the incidence of new CKD cases risen since then?  Notice it’s the over 65 population with the dramatic rise in new cases. That’s my age group.  Maybe it’s yours, too.

[Reminder from the glossary of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: Medicare is the U.S. government health insurance for those over 65, those having certain special needs, or those who have end stage renal disease.]

This next bit of information is from the American Kidney Fund at http://www.kidneyfund.org/about-us/assets/pdfs/akf-kidneydiseasestatistics-2012.pdf and shows us the numbers for 2012.  That’s getting closer to today, but it’s still three years ago.

Kidney disease is the 8th leading cause of death in the United States.

An estimated 31 million people in the United States (10% of the population) have chronic kidney disease (CKD).

9 out of 10 people who have stage 3 CKD (moderately decreased kidney function) do not know it.kidney interior

CKD is more common among women, but men with CKD are 50 more likely than women to progress to kidney failure (also called end-stage renal disease or ESRD)

Some racial and ethnic groups are at greater risk for kidney failure. Relative to whites, the risk for African Americans is 3.8 times higher, Native Americans is 2 times higher, Asians is 1.3 times higher, and Hispanics also have increased risk, relative to non-Hispanics.

I was diagnosed at stage 3, age 60, and had never heard of CKD before. This chart from the National Kidney Fund at www.kidney.org demonstrates the stages. The numbers outside the half circle represent the percentage of kidney function at each stage.

stages of CKD

That means I was one of the 9 out of 10 people who had stage 3 CKD and didn’t know it, even though I was a woman over 50 (actually, well over 50). Talk about being blind-sided!

What is itTime for another reminder – from my first book again: CKD is damage to the kidneys for more than three months, which cannot be reversed but may be slowed.

Imagine being told you had an incurable disease.  What would your first thought be?  Mine was bizarre. I told the nephrologist that my daughter was getting married.  What I didn’t tell him because I was so shocked at this diagnose is that I thought it meant I was going to die very soon, but I couldn’t allow that because I wanted to be at her wedding.

By the way, that’s where my CKD Awareness activism comes from. I didn’t want any of us to think we were under threat of imminent death once we were diagnosed.  I’d rather explain how to get tested (Eighth leading cause of death in the U.S.) and – #SlowItDownCKD – slow down the progression of the decline of your kidney function.

Let’s take a look at over countries.  This is from Kidney Health Australia as of May this year at http://www.kidney.org.au/kidneydisease/fastfactsonckd/tabid/589/default.aspx

HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE CKD?

  • Approximately 1.7 million Australians (1 in 10) aged 18 years and over have indicators of CKD such as reduced kidney function and/or the presence of albumin in the urine.
  • Less than 10% of the people with CKD are aware they have this condition.
  • This means over 1.5 million Australians are unaware they have indicators of CKD.

Unhealthy%20KidneyWHO IS AT INCREASED RISK OF CKD?

  • 1 in 3 Australians is at an increased risk of developing CKD.
  • Adult Australians are at an increased risk of CKD if they:
    • have diabetes
    • have high blood pressure
    • have established heart problems (heart failure or heart attack) and/or have had a stroke
    • have a family history of kidney disease
    • are obese (Body Mass Index BMI – more than or equal to 30)
    • are a smoker
    • are 60 years or older
    • are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin

Notice their statistics are similar to ours, but there are two more are higher risk groups.

IMG_1398

“In 2013, nearly one million people died from chronic kidney disease. While this represents less than 2 percent of all deaths globally, it is a 135 percent increase from the number of chronic kidney disease-related deaths in 1990.

While the global increase in chronic kidney disease-related deaths is driven in part by people living to older ages, there is no scientific consensus on what is making this increasingly prominent among younger adults, with a near doubling of chronic kidney disease-related deaths among people ages 15 to 49 since 1990.”

The quote above is from Humanosphere at http://www.humanosphere.org/science/2015/01/visualizing-the-rise-of-chronic-kidney-disease-worldwide/ and is related to The Global Burden of Disease Study.

So you see, we are not alone.  Nor are we living under a death sentence. We can spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease and educate those diagnosed as to how to slow down the progression of the disease.

Kidney ArizonaTalking (I know, I know, writing) about this, The National Kidney Fund of Arizona will be holding a Path to Wellness screening on Saturday, September 19, 2015 at the Indo American Cultural Center. This includes free blood and urine testing, which is evaluated onsite using point-of-care testing devices to assess for the risk of diabetes, heart and kidney diseases. Those screened are also presented with chronic disease management education, an overall health assessment (weight, blood pressure, etc.) and a one-on-one consultation with a physician. Enrollment opportunities are offered for a follow-up 6-week series of Healthy Living workshops that teach chronic disease self-management skills.

Oh, one last thing. Have you heard about P2P’s Chronic Illness Buy & Sell page on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/P2PBuy.Sell/ ? It will be the place to go for anything chronic illness related. My first book is advertised there and both The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease books will be soon, too.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

I Saw It!

I am so excited!  I watched my kidneys produce urine in live time.  Location of Kidneys

I know, I know: slow down.  Here’s the back story. Remember I wrote about having a bladder infection for the first time in about five years? During consultation with my primary care physician (PCP) about which antibiotic was safe for me, she pointed out that I had taken Ciprofloxacin before with no ill effects and that it was kidney safe. This is a  medication used to kill the bacteria causing an infection.

Okay, I felt comfortable taking it again without speaking to my nephrologist.  However, the 250 mg. twice a day I ingested for five days didn’t do the trick. I waited one day after finishing the prescription and then tested my urine with the same test strips I wrote about in May 25th’s post…and got the same positive results for leukocytes: elevated, which meant infection.

bladderBack to my PCP for more testing. After an in office urine test also showed leukocytes, Dr. Zhao ordered the urine sample be sent to the lab to be cultured, and both a renal and a bladder ultrasound for me. Both the ultrasounds came back normal. She is a very thorough doctor, especially when it comes to my Chronic Kidney Disease or anything that might affect it.  It is possible for infection to move up to the kidneys from the bladder. Luckily, that didn’t happen in my case. Here are the urine culture results from the lab which arrived well into my second regiment of Cipro:

Culture shows less than 10,000 colony forming units of bacteria per milliliter of urine. This colony count is not generally considered to be clinically significant.

Okay, so here I was taking 500 mg. twice a day for my second regiment of antibiotics.  This time I had checked with my nephrologist because of the doubled dosage and taking the second regiment so soon after the first. He gave his approval.

Cipro, like most other drugs, may have side effects.  I hadn’t realized why I was so restless and anxious.  Those are two of the not-so-often-encountered side effects, but I have nothing else to pin these strange (for me) feelings on. My uncustomarily anxiety was causing dissention in the family and interfering with my enjoyment of the life I usually love. After digging deep into possible side effects, I see why.  The funny thing is that all I had to do was read about these possible, but not likely, side effects to feel less anxious and restless.  I had a reason for these feelings; they sad facewould soon dissipate. I could live with that time limited discomfort.

Before taking the ultrasounds, I needed to drink 40 oz. of water – yep, almost two thirds of my daily allowance – and hold it in my bladder for an hour. I started joking with Wendy, the ultrasound technician, as soon as I got into the room.  You know, the usual: Hurry up before I float away, I can’t cross my knees any tighter, that sort of thing.

She was a lovely person who responded with kindness. When she realized I was super interested in what was on the screen, she started explaining what I was seeing to me and turned the screen so I could see what she was seeing. The bladder ultrasound was interesting… and colorful.

But the kidney ultrasound was magic!  I watched as my kidneys produced urine and the urine traveled down to the bladder.  This was real.  This was happening inside my body. And I was watching it in real time.

What is itIn What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I discuss one of the jobs of the kidneys:

They filter as many as 200 quarts of blood per day to rid us of roughly two quarts of waste and extra water.

I was watching the extra water move from my kidneys to my bladder!  I was probably watching the blood being filtered in the kidneys, too, but that was not as clear to me.

Well, what do you know?  It seems the National Kidney Foundation is running a campaign to make the public aware of that, too.  This is what the foundation has to say about the campaign.

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) has launched a cheeky campaign to promote kidney health and motivate people to get their urine screened.

EverybodyPees is an irreverent, educational animated music video plus a website (www.everybodypees.org) that focuses on the places people pee. EverybodyPees_PostersV3_Page_5The number one goal of the campaign is to link one of the kidneys’ primary functions — the production of urine — to overall kidney health. Pee is important because urine testing can reveal the earliest signs of kidney damage.

“Our research has shown that half of Americans don’t understand that healthy kidneys are responsible for creating urine,” said Kevin Longino, interim CEO of the National Kidney Foundation. “Urine also happens to hold the key to catching kidney disease, especially among the 73 million Americans who are at risk. The message may be unconventional, but it is educational and actionable – get your urine checked for kidney health.”

Kidney disease is at an alarming proportion in the United States. Over 26 million American adults have kidney disease and most don’t know it.  More than 40% of people who go into kidney failure each year fail to see a nephrologist before starting dialysis — a key indicator that kidney disease isn’t being identified in its earliest stages.Healthy%20Kidney

“People aren’t getting the message that they can easily identify kidney disease through inexpensive, simple tests,” said Jeffrey Berns, MD, President of the National Kidney Foundation. “Keeping kidneys top-of-mind in the restroom will hopefully remind people that they should be asking about their kidneys when they visit their healthcare professional, especially if they have diabetes, high blood pressure, a family history of kidney failure, or are over age 60.”

NKF-logo_Hori_OBEverybodyPees is NKF’s first attempt to tackle a serious national health problem from a relatable, consumer angle. The campaign was produced in collaboration with Publicis LifeBrands Medicus.

“We are flipping public health education messaging on its head –using humor to get our message across and foregoing scare tactic messaging” Longino said. “We’re going out on a limb with our core message on urine testing, but we need to take risks if we’re going to alter the course of kidney disease in this country.”

Being who I am, I prefer ‘urine’ to ‘pee,’ but that wouldn’t be half as catchy, would it?

Consider The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Parts 1 and 2 as bathroom reading while you’re urinating – uh, peeing – so we can get some more reviews. And always, let us know about any new CKD books you discover.

Until next week,Part 2Digital Cover Part 1

Keep living your life!

 

Sailing, Naturally

Wow!  I just spent the past three days at a Landmark Wisdom Unlimited course and discovered that my already terrific life is even more than terrific than I thought. The theme was loosely, “What do you like about your life?” I was one of those that just kept going and growing my list again and again. Sharing Chronic Kidney Disease awareness was high on that list.

Talking about sharing, I casually mentioned to my daughter Nima – researcher par excellence – that I was looking for information about natural Nimapreventatives and/or cures for sea sickness.  Most of today’s research came from her immediately jumping on my comment.  Then I casually mentioned to her that she might consider a job as a writer’s research assistant.  She’s a talented person in many areas (I guarantee you this is not just mother pride), and this is one of them.

Bear and I are still about six weeks out from my very first cruise.  I’ve managed all the business, such as the tickets, the land excursions, the hotels for before and after, etc. What I’m still working on is the cautions about motion sickness made by my sister-in-law – Judy Peck. Last week I wrote about over the counter medical solutions and their relationship to CKD.  This week, we go the natural path.IMG_0959 (1)

That said (written), I must caution you in my turn.  Natural aids have neither been tested nor approved by the Federal Drug Administration.  Even if you’re not in favor of the FDA, remember that dosages and timing of natural aids have not been tested either.  Also, see page 87 of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

In other words, if anything in today’s blog catches your interest, please check with your nephrologist before you even think of taking whatever the product is.  I am not a doctor, have never claimed to be one, and want you to understand that you and your nephrologist are the final arbitrators of what is safe for your kidneys and what is not.

Ready?  Here we go. First off, we have WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/acupressure-bands-for-motion-sickness-topic-overview. This is the one that caught my eye right away.

These bands use pressure, electricity, or both to stimulate the P6 acupuncture point. This point is located about two finger-widths from the crease on the underside of the wrist. The elastic bands usually have a raised surface that applies pressure on the wrist. Practitioners of acupuncture and acupressure believe stimulation of this point may stop nausea and vomiting.Adult Pack

Reminder: this is not an endorsement of this particular brand, simply a representation of what the band looks like and how it’s used.

Neither side effects nor effectiveness have been proven, so I’m wondering how I can test this before we cruise.  In New York, I would have jumped on the Staten Island ferry.  Wait, I never got seasick on the ferry, so that wouldn’t work.  Hmmm, I didn’t get seasick on the cruises around Manhattan Island either.

Maybe I’m one of those people who just doesn’t get seasick. But just in case you are, I’ll write about what else Nima found for us.

Many thanks to both my daughter for finding this and the HerbalShop.com at http://herbalshop.com/Acupressure/Acupressure_12.html for these

charts showing the acupressure points that can help.

Again, I don’t see how this can harm the kidneys, but I do urge you to talk with your nephrologist beforehand.  I found an equal number of articles in favor of and opposed to acupressure in the treatment of CKD, but none about using it for seasickness if you have CKD.  Interesting.

Now I’m wondering if this is my favorite natural seasickness aid. Of course, you can use a mixture of methods.  By the way, you don’t need to massage all these pressure points.  One or two may do the trick.

Nima also found an interesting (I think) article on yoga for seasickness on The Art of Living site at http://www.artofliving.org/in-en/yoga/health-and-wellness/yoga-for-motion-sickness. However, I have to admit my ignorance.  I understood very little of it since it mentioned positions a non-yogi – like me – would have to research and probably, more realistically, learn from a teacher – say as in a class.

The article didn’t mention CKD so I attempted to research yoga + chronic kidney disease + seasickness.  That didn’t work, so I kept rearranging the order of the search terms and still got no hits. I don’t see how yoga can hurt, other than sprains and strains if it’s all new to you, but I hesitate to say this is okay when I’m not your nephrologist.

Then there was this on Ask Dr. Mao at http://www.askdrmao.com/questions-and-answers/ginger-for-nausea/

Ginger has been used as food and medicine for millennia. Ginger’s modern use dates back to the early 1980s, when a scientist named D. Mowrey noticed that ginger-filled capsules reduced his nausea during an episode of flu. Subsequent research ultimately led to approve ginger being used as a treatment for indigestion and motion sickness.

Cup of Tea in MorningGinger is typically not as effective as standard drugs for motion sickness, but it has the advantage of not causing drowsiness. Some physicians recommend ginger over other motion sickness drugs for older individuals who are unusually sensitive to drowsiness or loss of balance.

However, the National Kidney Foundation does caution that ginger could interfere with your prescription medication.  While not specially aimed at the CKD population, this is the first I noticed any mention of “motion sickness drugs” and “loss of balance” in the same sentence. Odd that a medication aimed at relieving such symptoms can actually be a cause of one.

I have no intention of becoming seasick on our two cruises (the second in the Caribbean in September to celebrate said sister-in-law’s birthday and the 48th anniversary she will be sharing with my brother, Paul), but you know I’ll be bringing the acupressure chart and one of the seasickness bands with me… should my nephrologist concur.

Book Cover

I have a favor to ask: if you have read either of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, please write a review onDigital Cover Part 1 Amazon.com.  This is what one reader had to say in his review,

If you have kidney disease, like I do, you can relate to what Gail Rae-Garwood has written here… very useful…

Until next week,Part 2

Keep living your life!

The End

Now, before you get excited, I don’t mean your end or my end specifically.  I mean what do our families do with our bodies at the end of our lives?  sorry faceCKD or not, one thing we all have in common is that we’ll all die. Since I started writing the blog, I’ve lost three good friends to cancer.  Only one had left instructions for what to do with her body. I watched the grown children of the other two try to figure out what Mom would have wanted… while they dealt with their grief.

I don’t want to burden my children or my husband with making these decisions for me after my demise.  Sure, they are capable, but they’re also grownups who have started lives of their own. They don’t need the extra heartache of dealing with the end of mine on a pragmatic level. Bear has already told me I must make these decisions now since he will not be in a state to do so when I die. That was before I’d told him I already had.

Book CoverIn What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I wrote about MedCure.

I did contact MedCure {MedCure.org or call 866-560-2525}. This company will pick up your body after you die, harvest your tissues and organs for research and education and cremate the rest of you to give the ashes to whomever you designate. They will also scatter your ashes, if you’d prefer. This costs nothing, but they will test your body before accepting it.  According to their website, they will be testing for “…infectious disease or condition such as Hepatitis B or C, HIV/AIDS, active tuberculosis, history of illegal drug use, incarceration or severely under or overweight at the time of death.”

MedCure is the company I contacted.  I’m sure there are others. Their contract is a legal document under the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act and their home state’s Oregon Anatomical Gift Statutes. I noticed there is such an organization in my home state, but it doesn’t seem to matter where you live.

BioGift {http://biogift.org/body-donation-process.php} is another company that can help if you want to donate your body to science.  Again, the cremation is free. Their 24 hour telephone number is 866-670-1799. Here is their procedure.

The Process Step-By-Step at Time of Death

  1. Death is confirmed and reported to hospice care facility or emergency personnel.
  2. BioGift is contacted by caregiver, family or hospice representative.
  3. BioGift performs a Medical and Social questionnaire regarding the potential donation with family, hospice worker, nurse or physician at time of death. Acceptability will be determined at that time.
  4. Once accepted arrangements are made for transporting donor to BioGift’s facilities. We use professional funeral providers for these services.
  5. Blood is drawn from the donor to test for infectious diseases.
  6. Recovery of tissues is matched with medical researchers and educators requests.
  7. Remaining tissues, after recoveries, are sent to a licensed crematory for cremation at no cost to you.
  8. Cremated remains are mailed by US Registered mail to the specified person or the cemetery on the cremation authorization. If you live within 30 miles of BioGift we can deliver to specified person or cemetery. If requested BioGift will scatter at sea with other donors.
  9. Within four weeks, depending on what State and County the death occurred in, two certified death certificates will be mailed to the family.
  10. BioGift will send the family follow-up correspondence regarding donation.

These are just two of such organizations.  For me, the decision was easy.  I know many people who just don’t want to talk about it and I understand that, but I’m going to give you the top ten reasons to donate your body anyway… just so you can think about it.cadesus

This is from CNN {http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/10/28/body.after.you.die/index.html}. I’ve left most of the explanatory material out of the list, but thought #8 needed just a little explanation.

  1. Donate your organs
  2. Donate your tissue
  3. Will your body to a university
  4. Help doctors practice their skills
  5. Leave your body to “the body farm”
  6. Become a crash test cadaver
  7. Give your body to a broker
  8. Send your body on tour

If you’ve been to the “Body Worlds” exhibit, you know what plastination is: a process of posing and hardening a body so it appears life-like.

You, too, could become one of these bodies on display by donating to the Institute for Plastination. If you live in the United States or Canada, your body will be embalmed on your own continent and then shipped to Germany, where technicians will perform the plastination process.

  1. Become a skeleton
  2. Be on display at a museum

I am not a ghoul.  I don’t expect you to be jumping up and down with joy as you read today’s blog. But this is a world in which donations are necessary.

Today we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King’s birthday.  In his wordsmartin-luther-king-jr

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘What are you doing for others?”

This is the ultimate method of doing for others.

Talking about doing for others, I have discovered that The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease is simply too long for one book.  I finally received the proof copy, opened it up, and the binding split.  Never saw that coming! It looks like there will have to be a Part 1 and a Part 2.  While I sort that out, you can still order it digitally on Amazon where – for the time being – you’ll really be buying two books for the price of one.  Remind me to write the next book of blogs way before four years, will you?

Until next week,41DsvandphL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-stThe Book of Blogs

Keep living your life!

Happy Anniversary… Sort Of

4weddingYesterday was our first anniversary. Given my Chronic Kidney Disease complicated bouts of bronchitis and Bear’s surgery, it’s been a medically challenging year for us.  We were glad to start Year Two as a married couple, but not before we celebrated the end of the first year by eating the piece of wedding cake our well-meaning friends had insisted be placed in an airtight plastic bag and frozen for a year.

Of course, that meant to me that we should have the special ground coffee I had ordered for the wedding with the cake, so I saved some of that, too. My daughter, Nima, had been a Starbuck’s barista for a time and carefully explained to me that you don’t freeze or refrigerate coffee.  So I just folded over the top of the bag and clipped it shut.

Those of you clutching your stomachs as you run for the restroom (weird word that) know exactly what happened.  This is ridiculous, I thought.  That’s a long standing tradition.  How could anything so romantic make anyone sick?  Hah!

And that led me to wondering how and when this tradition started. The answer I found left me laughing.  You will too when you remember we had each passed 65 when we married. According to http://www.hudsonvalleyweddings.com/guide/cakehistory.htm, “The tradition has its roots in the late 19th century when grand cakes were baked for christenings. It was assumed that the christening would occur soon after the wedding ceremony, so the two ceremonies were often linked, as were the cakes.”

Hang on and you’ll eventually see what the wedding cake tradition and the coffee have to do with CKD.

Back to the cake:  I scouted around and found this freezing guide at http://www.home-storage-solutions-101.com/freezer-storage-times.html:download (6)

Bread & Desserts TIme
Baked bread and cookies 3 months
Cakes, pastries and doughnuts 3 months
Muffins and quick breads 3 months
Pancakes and waffles 3 months
Cooke or bread dough 1 month
Produce TIme
Fruits 1 year
Juices 1 year
Vegetables 8 months
Nuts 3 months
Dairy & Eggs TIme
Ice cream 2 months
Butter 9 months
Cheese 3 months
Eggs (raw, not in shells) 1 year
Milk 1 month
Meats TIme
Ground beef, pork & stew meats 4 months
Other beef (i.e., roasts, steaks) 1 year
Lamb and veal 9 months
Ham 2 months
Pork chops 4 months
Pork roast or loin 8 months
Bacon and sausage 1 month
Poultry TIme
Chicken and turkey (whole) 1 year
Chicken and turkey (cuts) 6 months
Ground turkey and chicken 4 months
Seafood TIme
Fatty fish (i.e., mackerel, trout) 3 months
Lean fish (i.e., cod, flounder) 6 months
Crab 10 months
Lobster 1 year
Shrimp and scallops (unbreaded) 1 year
Miscellaneous TIme
Casseroles (cooked) 3 months
Paste and rice (cooked) 3 months
Soups and stews 2 months

 

This is not the gospel of freezing food, but I wanted to give you a general guideline.  Did you notice that “3 months” for cakes?  I think I’m beginning to understand the stomach ailment now. (She groaned.)

That, of course, made me wonder how long ground coffee could keep if it wasn’t frozen or refrigerated, which would have made it take on the taste of its neighbors and help destroy its own wonderful flavor. I went to http://www.eatbydate.com/drinks/coffee-tea-shelf-life/coffee-shelf-life-expiration-date/ for this chart.

 

(Unopened/Sealed) Pantry Freezer
Past Printed Date Past Printed Date
Ground Coffee lasts for 3-5 Months 1-2 Years
Whole Bean Coffee lasts for 6-9 Months 2-3 Years
Instant Coffee lasts for 2-20 Years Indefinite
(Opened) Pantry Freezer
Once Opened Once Opened
Ground Coffee lasts for 3-5 Months 3-5 Months
Coffee Beans last for 6 Months 2 Years
Instant Coffee (freeze dried) lasts for 2-20 Years Indefinite

cup-of-coffee-2

 

 

Ugh! A year is substantially more than the 3 to 5 months suggested.  Okay, so now you have the back story.

Book CoverThanks for being patient. Here’s where the CKD comes in. Your kidneys filter toxins and waste products from your blood.  They also regulate electrolyte levels and blood pressure and produce hormones, among their many jobs.  If they’re busy taking care of food poisoning (or whatever you call eating improperly or overly frozen or stored food), they have less time – or is it energy? – to pay attention to their typical jobs.  There’s even a theory that food poisoning can further compromise our already compromised immune systems.  There’s more information at http://www.medic8.com/healthguide/food-poisoning/kidney-failure.html

So much more than this has happened since last week.  On March 25th (okay, so that was over a week ago), we presented at The Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community Family Health Fair. That’s where these pictures were taken.  I’m seriously considering using the SlowItDown picture as a business card and welcome your opinion about that.SlowItDown business cardhealth fair.Salt River Great Seal

We were also able to attend my father’s family’s reunion and, more importantly, spend time with my brother, Paul, and sister-in-law, Judy Peck, in Florida which meant I was able to share both the book and SlowItDown with a Boca Raton hospital, a Brandon nephrology practice, and AAKP of Florida.  Public thanks to all of you for your kind reception.

Twitter people have been retweeting and favoriting both SlowItDown and What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s tweets like crazy which kidney-book-coverI greatly appreciate.  Hey, we’re still the new kids on the block, you know.

There’s also a profile coming up in the Medicare magazine, but I haven’t received a date for that yet.  Another radio interview – this time for SlowItDown – is in the works for July.  There’s even the possibility of public service announcements for SlowItDown in the Washington, D.C. area.  More on each of these as they’re solidified.

By the way, the first anniversary is traditionally paper.  What better gift (well, maybe that’s stretching it a bit) to give to the first anniversary celebrators of CKD families, friends, and co-workers?  Or send them over to the blog for more education.  If they print it, that’s paper, too.choclate Alex

Ah!  The light bulb goes on over my head!  I just figured out why Bear isn’t feeling the same way I am.  He doesn’t have CKD (thank goodness) and doesn’t have a compromised immune system.  His kidneys are doing a terrific job of getting rid of toxins… bless those two little guys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Down in the Mouth

With all that’s going on here, I managed to add insult to injury… all by myself.  While trying to open the new jar of honey so I could sweeten Bear’s tea, I broke my tooth.  Don’t ask how; it’s too embarrassing to explain.  At any rate, I was sleep deprived, still recovering from that terrible bronchitis and all I could think was, “Why didn’t that hurt?  I’m standing here with a piece my tooth in my hand and it doesn’t hurt.”

It took a few minutes for me to focus. That’s when I realized it was a not my real tooth; it was the plastic replacement for one of my two front teeth.  I don’t know if you can describe breaking your tooth as lucky, but this one was for me – no pain.  I contemplated not having it fixed since it didn’t look that bad. Ah, but I could hear the lisp when I spoke.  I’d spent quite a bit of time in speech therapy when I was a youngster to lose the lisp and I didn’t want it back again.

Hmmmm, I’ve been trying to figure out how to whiten my teeth.  I was fine with my tooth color until whitening became possible.  People looked wonderful and really healthy with white teeth.  I wanted white teeth, too, until I heard how much that would cost me.  For vanity?  No way, but now that it’s a necessity….dentist

I asked my dentist, Dr. William C. Kaus of Bellaire Smiles here in Glendale, Arizona, if I could get a lighter replacement bridge. I figured that since the bridge covered six of my top front teeth, the ones you see when someone smiles, it might be worth a shot.  He agreed, so we’ll go for the brightest available for the temporary bridge and see if the permanent bridge needs to be a darker hue.  I find myself excited about this.

Here’s what it has to do with Chronic Kidney Disease.  I always urge you to speak to your doctor, every kind of doctor you have.  That includes your dentist.  I told him about my fear of pain in my mouth, the fear I’ve had since I opened a car door into my mouth at age 19.

That’s what caused the need for the root canals in my two front teeth and the need to file them down, way down.  I’d forgotten how very long they had been.  I was warned the teeth might darken and flake in 20 years or so, but 20 years is a long time to a 19 year old.

They lasted longer than 20 years, but did eventually fall apart.  That’s when they were extracted and the bridge with the two new front teeth and anchors for two teeth on either side was inserted.  That’s probably a quarter of your mouth.  Let’s see you have 32 teeth and I had four wisdom teeth extracted which means 28 minus the one that… well, you get the point.

I asked for nitrous oxide, even though replacing a bridge is not a painful procedure. According to Medscape at: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1413427-overview, nitrous oxide – commonly called laughing gas or sleeping gas – goes nowhere near the kidneys.  I remember researching when I first was diagnosed with CKD and calling my nephrologist to make certain it’s safe.  (Confession: I am a dental coward since that car accident.)  It is inhaled, goes into the lungs, and then is exhaled via respiration (breathing).  It doesn’t go anywhere near the kidneys.laughing gas

Dr. Kaus recognized that my fear was very real for me, assured me that nitrous oxide – which is combined with oxygen before you inhale it, by the way – would not be a problem and very gently asked me if I’d like something a bit stronger, say, valium.

Everyone’s heard of valium, but I didn’t know much about it and preferred not to take it.  When I was in the throes of bronchitis (was that only last week?), the ER doctor wanted me to take cough syrup with codeine in it, but I’m really, really sensitive to drugs and knew that was going to knock me out.  I didn’t see the point and politely declined that, too.  I’m not good with drugs.

So, valium.  Can and do CKD patients use this drug?    I found this warning at http://www.pdrhealth.com/drugs/valium  (Physicians’ Desk Reference):

“Use Valium with caution if you have any type of kidney or liver problems.”

There was nothing about WHY you need to be cautious in your use of valium.  I spent an hour or so more researching, but all I can find were admonition after admonition to tell your doctor if you have kidney disease and repeated mention that the dosage of the drug valiumhas to be accommodated to your degree of kidney function.  But that’s true of any drug you take.  The lack of specific information for non-medical people about valium only re-enforced my decision not to take the drug.

I am thrilled to remind you that, just in time for Chanukah, Amazon.com has included What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease in their Kindle MatchBook  program. That allows you to buy the Kindle edition of the book for $2.99 instead Book Coverof its regular price of $9.95 if you have EVER bought the print copy of the book from Amazon.  Happy Chanukah.

I am actively looking for ways to make the book an affordable gift for Kwanza and Christmas, but think this program is going to be it.  I like how much more accessible it makes the book to those who may need it but weren’t in a position to pay the regular price.

I spent the weekend at a Landmark class where I usually meet the most interesting people.  This weekend was no exception. I discovered that one of my classmates has a nonprofit to offer help to chronic disease sufferers and another is a Doctor of Oriental Medicine.  Both now have copies of the book to share with their patients back in Denver.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

By Request, Ladies and Gentlemen: The Flu (Redux)

We’re back thanks to the ever willing Sean who pitched right in and picked us up from the airport when we realized Abby, who had taken us to the airport, holds a blues dance just about the time we arrived back in Phoenix. Doctors and medical practices in Apollo Beach, Tampa, Mount Dora and Orlando are now proud owners of office copies of the book.

But while we were on the plane both ways, I heard coughing, sneezing, throat clearing and sniffling… lots of it.  Was this the flu?  All my relatives and friends had seemed healthy enough, but they weren’t traveling on these planes.interior of plane

That got me to thinking more about the flu just as it was requested that I re-run the flu blogs. Before doing so, I thought I’d find out more about this season’s flu.  Sure enough, MedPage Today ran just such an article on January 10th of this new year.  According to Todd Neale, who wrote the article, “Last week, the CDC reported that 41 states had widespread influenza activity, and 29 states and New York City had high influenza-like illness activity in the week ending Dec. 29. Although not unprecedented, that level of activity is not usually seen until later in the season.”

Some of the physicians quoted in the article wondered if it’s the reporting of the illness that’s improved thereby making the flu appear more widespread than it really is.  I don’t think I believe that since there seems to be a shortage of both vaccines and drugs to treat this ailment and Boston’s mayor has declared a public health emergency due to the 700 cases reported in his city. You need only click through to http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/URItheFlu/36801 to read the article for yourself.

According to Healthfinder.gov, you can protect yourself from the flu by doing the following:

Getting the flu vaccine is the most important step in protecting yourself from the flu. Here are some other things you can do to keep from getting and spreading the flu:

  • Stay away from people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water.
  • Try not to touch your nose, mouth, or eyes.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze

I wondered how to tell the difference between a cold and the flu.  Since being diagnosed with ckd, I make it a point to take the flu vaccine annually, yet there have been times when I just didn’t feel that well. I found my answer in the following: http://abcnews.go.com/health/t/blogEntry?id=17885194  “ ‘With influenza you might also feel very poorly, with aches and pains in your muscles and joints,’ said Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. ‘There’s often a cough, too, which is much more prolonged and pronounced.’ ”

I’m including part of an article by The National Kidney Foundation so you can feel confidant that your kidneys are being covered here.

Flu Season and Your Kidneys

By Leslie Spry, MD FACP FASN

As flu season approaches, kidney patients need to know what they can do and what they should avoid if they become ill. The first and most important action to take is to get a flu shot. All patients with chronic kidney disease, including those with a kidney transplant should have a flu shot. Transplant patients may not have the nasal mist flu vaccine known as FluMist®. Transplant patients should have the regular injection for their flu vaccine. If you are a new transplant recipient, within the first 6 months, it is advisable to check with your transplant coordinator to make sure your transplant team allows flu shots in the first 6 months after transplant. ALL other kidney patients should receive a flu vaccination.

If the influenza virus is spreading in your community, there are medications that you can take to protect against influenza if you have not been vaccinated, however the dose of these medications may have to be modified for your level of kidney function. This is also true of antibiotics or any medication that you take for colds, bacterial infections or other viral infections. [Me: I have written about this in the book and the blog.  You have to tell the prescribing physician about your CKD and/or remind him of it if (s)he already knows each time a prescription is written for you.] The doses of those medications may have to be modified for your level of kidney function. Even if you are vaccinated, it is still possible to get influenza and pneumonia, but the disease is usually much milder.

You should get plenty of rest and avoid other individuals who are ill, in order to limit the spread of the disease. If you are ill, stay home and rest. You should drink plenty of fluids [me again: remember your limit on fluid intake] to stay well hydrated. You should eat a balanced diet. If you have gastrointestinal illness including nausea, vomiting or diarrhea, you should contact your physician. Immodium® is generally safe to take to control diarrhea. If you become constipated, medications that contain polyethylene glycol, such as Miralax® and Glycolax® are safe to take. You should avoid laxatives that contain magnesium and phosphates. Gastrointestinal illness can lead to dehydration or may keep you from taking your proper medication. If you are on a diuretic, it may not be a good idea to keep taking that diuretic if you are unable to keep liquids down or if you are experiencing diarrhea. You should monitor you temperature and blood pressure carefully and report concerns to your physician. Any medication you take should be reported to your physician. [Me: I’ve gotten other advice about those brands, so check with your nephrologist before you take anything.]

fit the flu

Medications to avoid include all non-steroidal medications including ibuprofen, Motrin®, Advil®, Aleve®, and naproxen. Acetaminophen (Tylenol® and others) and aspirin are generally safe to take with kidney disease. Acetaminophen doses should not exceed 4000 milligrams per day [Me: Nobody ever told me that! Why?] If you take any of the over-the-counter medications, you should always drink plenty of water and stay well hydrated. If you take anti-histamines or decongestants, you should avoid those that contain ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. Over-the-counter cold remedies that are safe to take for patients with high blood pressure are generally designated “HBP”. Any over-the-counter medication that you take for a cold or flu should be approved by your doctor.

You can find the article at: http://www.kidney.org/patients/FluSeasonAndYourKidneys.cfm.  Again, although this a nationally respected doctor, it is not your doctor.  Check everything you plan to take with your nephrologist BEFORE you take it. By the way, Medicare covers the cost of the flu shot.

Here is some of the information England’s Department of Health offered in 2011 :

Seasonal flu vaccination: Who should have it and why

What harm can seasonal flu do?

People sometimes think a bad cold is flu, but having flu can be much worse than a cold and you may need to stay in bed for a few days if you have flu. Some people are more susceptible to the effects of seasonal flu. For them it can increase the risk of developing more serious illnesses such as bronchitis and pneumonia, or can make existing conditions worse. In the worst cases, seasonal flu can result in a stay in hospital, or even death.

Am I at greater risk from the effects of seasonal flu?

Even if you feel healthy, you should definitely consider having the free [me: in England, that is] seasonal flu vaccination if you have:

  • a heart problem
  • a chest complaint or breathing difficulties, including bronchitis or emphysema
  • a kidney disease  [Me: I bolded and italicized this for obvious reasons.]
  • lowered immunity due to disease or treatment (such as steroid medication or cancer treatment)
  • a liver disease
  • had a stroke or a transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
  • diabetes
  • a neurological condition, for example multiple sclerosis (MS) or cerebral palsy
  • a problem with your spleen, for example sickle cell disease, or you have had your spleen removed.

Here’s the URL for this article: http://www.dh.gov.uk/health/2011/10/winter-flu/       Book Cover

This is an usually long blog.  That was necessary for you to understand that you can die from influenza… or you can take preventative measures. I don’t want to scare you and need to remind you that “can” doesn’t mean “will.”

Until next week when I’ll try to remember to tell you about Harry Potter’s World,

Keep living your life!

The State of The Mind Address

Monday again… and I, for one, am so glad to see it.  It’s blog day and I’ve got a lot to say today.  I’ve been down – well, as down as my optimistic nature allows – with all the medical issues surrounding me the last few weeks. My very, very dear friend and sometimes ‘sister’ has been diagnosed with stage IV bowel cancer, diabetes, hypertension, depression, and anxiety. One of my children is being successfully treated for depression and anxiety, but has developed a pre-diabetic condition and elevated cholesterol.

So, what did I do?  What else?  I researched mental life’s effect on physical health. I found information I’d always taken for granted proven scientifically and some – like the different types of smiles – I hadn’t thought about.

In EurekAlert!’s July 30th article, I zeroed in on the following.

Poor mental health linked to reduced life expectancy

“There is a possibility that mental health problems may be associated with biological changes in the body that increase the risk of diseases such as heart disease.

In this study, approximately a quarter of people suffered from minor symptoms of anxiety and depression, however, these patients do not usually come to the attention of mental health services. The authors say that their findings could have implications for the way minor mental health problems are treated.”

Of course there’s more to the article, which you can read at: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-07/wt-pmh073112.php

It made sense to me.  Another one of my children had troublesomely high cholesterol when she was agonizing over a major life decision three years ago.  She took her medication, ate the right foods and made certain she exercised and it kept right on rising.  Fast forward to a few months after she made and acted upon her decision. She faced her fear (thank you, Landmark) and returned to her doctor for a complete physical even though she had stopped taking the medication and ignored her diet. As a dancer (she IS my daughter), exercise wasn’t a problem. I’m so glad she did go back to the doctor.  There is no sign of elevated cholesterol.  Why?  I’m laying it on the fact that she’s happier now.

I tend to smile quite a bit and look for reasons to smile even when life seems hard.  I wondered if that were helping me with my own health and, if so, would it help others. Then I located this Aug. 1, Medical News Today article:

Smiling Reduces Stress And Helps The Heart

“A new study suggests that holding a smile on one’s face during periods of stress may help the heart. The study, due to be published in a forthcoming issue of Psychological Science, lends support to the old adage ‘grin and bear it,’ suggesting it may also make us feel better.”

The article goes on to distinguish between the different kinds of smiling.  You can find it at:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248433.php.

I found something unexpected to be happy about this week: Medical ID Fashions.  If you remember (and even if you don’t), I’d taken them off my blog roll because I ordered one of their medical alert bracelets and when it was delivered, there was a note in the box saying it could not be submerged in water.

I have osteoarthritis and could not (oh, all right, so I just didn’t want to) spend precious minutes a day struggling to get it off and on before I hit the shower. I just wanted something pretty that I could put on and ignore. I emailed the company about not warning the consumer that it wasn’t waterproof BEFORE the bracelet was purchased and received.

I heard nothing for months on end. Then the bracelet started to tarnish and I cleaned it.  Mistake!  Seems it could not tolerate the cleaning supplies I was using because there was some kind of protective coating over the brass and copper parts of it – a coating I knew nothing about since there was no information about cleaning on the website nor was any sent with the bracelet.

Again I sent an email.  This time I got a reply in less than 24 hours with a request to call them.  When I did and explained the problem, they offered to replace the bracelet with a waterproof stainless steel one for the difference in the price of the two bracelets.  I also noticed the websites now mentions which bracelets are waterproof although nothing is included about NOT being waterproof in the other bracelets’ descriptions.  There’s also still a lack of information about how to clean the bracelets.

I have already return mailed my old, ruined bracelet (who knew trying to be neat and clean could cause such problems?) and PayPal-ed the $20.  Now I wait. So I won’t have the pretty silver-copper-brass bracelet I wanted. I’ll have a waterproof, cleanable stainless steel one instead.  It may not be stylish but it could be a life saver.

I’m starting to see sales in England!  That’s something else to make me smile.  And thanks to AKDHC’s flier campaign, I’m starting to receive telephone calls from people who want the book but don’t have or know how to use a computer. I have a bunch of books I keep in the office for those without computers.  They can also be personally inscribed, if you’d like.  Just send me an email at: myckdexperience@gmail.com.

Time to get to researching cataract surgery and ckd.  Mine are scheduled for August 14th and September 4th.

Oh, got an email from a reader whose tests showed she had NO ckd, although she’d been diagnosed at stage 3.  Being a smart one, she retook the tests.  The first set of tests had false results.  No one knows quite how that happened, but if you should find you suddenly have test results, good or bad, that are totally unexpected, please have them redone.  We all want NOT to have CKD, but need to pay attention to it if we do.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

NEWS FLASH!

Happy July 4th, folks!

The news flash is on Kidneysteps.com.  Take a look at that first article.  Yep, that’s me.

Enjoy that quick read and I’ll see you Monday, as usual but from Portland, Oregon!

Until Monday,

Keep living your life!!!!

Last Day To Hear The Radio Broadcast

Hi there,

This is just a quick mid-week reminder that today is the second (and last) day to hear The Wellness Show interview about the book: http://t.co/DKYDX7C.

Happy listening and, until Monday,

Keep living your life!

Published in: on September 1, 2011 at 10:24 am  Leave a Comment  
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