Keep It Where It Belongs 

You’ve all read about my cancer dance in one blog or another. Thank goodness, that’s over. But there are residual effects like hand and foot neuropathy, chemo brain (akin to CKD’s brain fog), and – to my great surprise – abdominal incisional hernia after surgery. How did that happen, I wondered.

Get ready for this: those with Chronic Kidney Disease have a 12.8% higher incidence of abdominal incisional hernia according to a PubMed 2013 study published on ResearchGate’s site available at https://bit.ly/3kdvxfl,

“Chronic kidney disease is associated with impaired wound healing and constitutes an independent risk factor for incisional hernia development.”

(The percentage of abdominal incisional hernia among CKD patients was taken from the cohort in this abstract.)

According to the same study:

“Elevated uremia toxins may inhibit granulation tissue formation and impair wound healing, thereby promoting incisional hernia development.”

As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we know the accumulation of uremia toxins as uremia. On to my favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/uremia for a definition of uremia:

“1: accumulation in the blood of constituents normally eliminated in the urine that produces a severe toxic condition and usually occurs in severe kidney disease

2: the toxic bodily condition associated with uremia”

It gets worse. First, you have to know that I am considered ‘elderly,’ another surprise.  According to The World Health Organization at https://bit.ly/32sQq05:

“Most developed world countries have accepted the chronological age of 65 years as a definition of ‘elderly’ or older person….”

I’m 73 and here’s why you needed this information that I am of advancing age.

“The risk factors for incisional hernia following abdominal surgery include (ranked by relative risk):

Emergency surgery

Emergency surgery carries double the risk of elective surgery.

Wound type

BMI >25

Obese patients are more likely to develop an incisional hernia

Midline incision

There is a 74% risk increase compared to non-midline

Wound infection

This increases incisional hernia risk by 68%.

Pre-operative chemotherapy

Intra-operative blood transfusion

Advancing age

Pregnancy

Other less common risk factors include chronic cough, diabetes mellitus, steroid therapy, smoking, and connective tissue disease.”

Thank you TeachMeSurgery at https://bit.ly/2GYrOUH for this risk factor information.

I have so many risks factors. Foremost for me, of course, is Chronic Kidney Disease as demonstrated earlier in this blog, but also advancing age. Oh no, we’ll have to add obesity since my oncologist just told me my BMI is higher than 25 and must be lowered in order to keep the possibility of cancer reoccurrence to a minimum.  Then there’s midline incision. My scar runs down the middle of my front from the breasts to below the belly button. Oh, and let’s not forget pre-operative chemotherapy. I had plenty of that. Then there’s intra-operative blood transfusion… to the tune of six for me. I almost forgot to include diabetes mellitus. Hmm, I do believe I had steroid therapy during my chemotherapy treatments, too.

Now what? The hernia is right there, visibly noticeable along the scar line and I understand all the possible reasons it’s there. We all know I have to do something about it, but why? Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/hernia#complications answers that question for us.

“Sometimes an untreated hernia can lead to potentially serious complications. Your hernia may grow and cause more symptoms. It may also put too much pressure on nearby tissues, which can cause swelling and pain in the surrounding area.

A portion of your intestine could also become trapped in the abdominal wall. This is called incarceration. Incarceration can obstruct your bowel and cause severe pain, nausea, or constipation.

If the trapped section of your intestines doesn’t get enough blood flow, strangulation occurs. This can cause the intestinal tissue to become infected or die. A strangulated hernia is life-threatening and requires immediate medical care.”

Uh-oh. What can I do? My oncologist suggested a wait and see approach with a twist. I’m now wearing something similar to the belly band that pregnant women wear. The differences are that this is worn around my body to cover the hernia and is very tight in an attempt to have the hernia heal itself. Will this work? That remains to be seen.

What if it doesn’t? Well, there’s always surgery. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at https://bit.ly/3hsFHae tells us,

“The treatment options for incisional hernias are open surgery or minimally invasive surgery. Minimally invasive surgery is also called ‘keyhole surgery,’ or ‘laparoscopic’ surgery if it is performed on the abdomen.”

Wait a minute, laparoscopic surgery. What’s that? Let’s go to MedlinePlus to see what we can find out. This explanation was at https://bit.ly/2RmkS5R.

“Laparoscopic surgery is a surgical technique in which short, narrow tubes (trochars) are inserted into the abdomen through small (less than one centimeter) incisions. Through these trochars, long, narrow instruments are inserted. The surgeon uses these instruments to manipulate, cut, and sew tissue.”

That does seem less invasive, but it’s still surgery. Let’s take a look at recovery time for laparoscopic surgery vs. open surgery. Open surgery is just what it sounds like: you’re cut open.

“When the surgeons are equally skilled and a procedure is available as both an open procedure and a minimally invasive one, the minimally invasive technique almost always offers a lower risk of infection, shorter recovery times and equally successful outcomes.”

Mind you, sometimes keyhole or laparoscopic surgery is not a choice since the surgeon needs to work on a larger area. For example, I had open cancer surgery since not only the tumor, but also my gall bladder and spleen, needed to be removed. Sometimes, what starts out as minimally invasive surgery becomes open surgery when the surgeons run into a problem or realize they need to work on a larger internal area than they’d originally thought.

I still find it amazing how connected all parts of our body are… like Chronic Kidney Disease adding to affecting a scar to the point that a hernia develops.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

It Isn’t  Ain’t; It’s AIN.  

I’ll explain that in a minute, but first – on this Labor Day weekend – I want to thank all the readers who have liked individual blogs. These likes let me know I’m writing about topics that interest you.

Let’s turn to AIN now.  You know it’s not just a word, but an acronym. That’s a word formed by the initials of a term, like ASAP for as soon as possible. By the way, ‘nym’ means name, while ‘acr’ means height, summit, tip, top.  ‘O’ connects the two roots. So, we have the tip of the words or the first letters forming an acronym which becomes a recognized word. Thank you to my college course in Greek and Latin roots. I knew that would come on handy someday and it has again and again.

Well, what does AIN mean? It is the acronym for Allergic Interstitial Nephritis, which is a mouthful itself. ‘Allergic’ we get. That’s a common enough word. ‘Interstitial’, though? I remember the prefix (group of related words before the root word that changes its meaning) ‘inter’ means between, but between what? Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://bit.ly/3h3cF0H, here we come.

asituated within but not restricted to or characteristic of a particular organ or tissue —used especially of fibrous tissue

 baffecting the interstitial tissues of an organ or part

I wonder if we’ll need both definitions. I think we need to be reminded of what nephritis is before we can tell. Again, I remember from that college course so very long ago (Funny what sticks in your mind, isn’t it?) that ‘itis’ means inflammation. We know from all the writings about Chronic Kidney Disease that ‘neph’ means kidneys. Putting these together, we have inflammation of the kidneys. Let’s take a look at my favorite dictionary again, just to be certain.

Yep, there we have it at www.merriam-webster/dictionary/nephritis:

“acute or chronic inflammation of the kidney caused by infection, degenerative process, or vascular disease”

How do you define the whole term? According the excerpt from Nancy A. Finnigan and Khalid Bashir’s book Statpearls on NCBI’s bookshelf at https://bit.ly/31ZTeS2,

“Allergic interstitial nephritis (AIN) is the most common form of acute interstitial nephritis. It is most often caused by exposure to a drug. AIN is often associated with an acute decline in renal function and may be associated with permanent renal insufficiency.”

Acute? Oh, yes. That’s means sudden. It’s the opposite of chronic, which means long term. Looks like we only needed the second dictionary definition of interstitial after all.

So, this kind of nephritis is usually caused by drugs? Which drugs? I went to UpToDate at https://bit.ly/3i4exHS for the answer:

“The most common drug causes of AIN now include …:

  • Nonsteroidalanti-inflammatoryagents (NSAIDs), including selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors
  • Penicillinsand cephalosporins
  • Rifampin
  • Antimicrobial sulfonamides, including trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole
  • Ciprofloxacin and,perhaps toa lesser degree, other quinolones
  • Diuretics, including loop diuretics such as furosemide and bumetanide, and thiazide-type diuretics
  • Cimetidine (only rare cases have been described with other H-2 blockers such as ranitidine) [24,25]
  • Allopurinol
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as omeprazole and lansoprazole [26-29]
  • Indinavir
  • 5-aminosalicylates (eg, mesalamine)”

There are some very common drugs on this list. As Chronic Kidney Disease patients, we are warned away from NSAIDS. I’ve been warned about Ciprofloxacin, too, and PPIs, but diuretics? Most of the other drugs we’d have to ask our doctors about when and if they’re prescribed. Then again, I ask my family doctor to check the effect of the drug on the kidneys when she prescribes a drug. She happily does so.

You should note that many of these drugs do not require a prescription. In that case, speak with your pharmacist about its possible effect on your kidneys before buying any over the counter drug. Another possibility is using Drugs.com or a similar website for possible effects on your kidneys before using any drugs.

What are the symptoms, if any, of AIN? Well, much like Chronic Kidney Disease, there are often no symptoms until it is quite advanced. Then you would notice the acute drop in kidney function. A blood test and urine test will help with the diagnosis, although the urine test will only show the presence of white blood cells. That indicates an infection. Sometimes a kidney biopsy is required to diagnose AIN.

And now the biggie: what do you do if you develop AIN? You stop the medication. It’s common sense. Your doctor will probably suggest that once it’s been determined you have allergic interstitial nephritis. Remember though, there are other causes of AIN such as infections and/or autoimmunity.

Topic switch: While I’ve been laboring over this blog, I’ve also been thinking about the fact that today is Labor Day in the United States. Coming from a union family, I thought I’d tell you a little bit about Labor Day that you may not know.

This, and more information about Labor Day, may be found at https://bit.ly/3jPeaRR

“In the late 1800s, the state of labor was grim as U.S. workers toiled under bleak conditions: 12 or more hour workdays; hazardous work environments; meager pay. Children, some as young as 5, were often fixtures at plants and factories.

The dismal livelihoods fueled the formation of the country’s first labor unions, which began to organize strikes and protests and pushed employers for better hours and pay. Many of the rallies turned violent.

On Sept. 5, 1882 — a Tuesday — 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march in a parade from City Hall to Union Square in New York City as a tribute to American workers. Organized by New York’s Central Labor Union, It [sic]was the country’s first unofficial Labor Day parade. Three years later, some city ordinances marked the first government recognition, and legislation soon followed in a number of states.”

As many of you already know, my grandfather was an organizer for the Brass Workers Union. Many a time he’d disappear. He was jailed for his activities, but that didn’t stop him.

As you labor to avoid AIN and keep your kidneys functioning properly, enjoy the holiday weekend.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

The Dye is Cast

Bet you think I made a spelling error in the title. If you’re thinking of the original phrase, you’re right. In that one, it’s spelled ‘die’. Here’s where it came from according to Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alea_iacta_est:

Alea iacta est (‘The die has been cast’) is a variation of a Latin phrase (iacta alea est [ˈjakta ˈaːlɛ.a ˈɛst]) attributed by Suetonius to Julius Caesar on January 10, 49 BCE, as he led his army across the Rubicon river in Northern Italy…. The phrase, either in the original Latin or in translation, is used in many languages to indicate that events have passed a point of no return. It is now most commonly cited with the word order changed (‘Alea iacta est’) rather than in the original phrasing….”

Uh-oh, there is in existence a phrase just like the title of today’s blog. It means the tint has been applied and can’t be changed or something like that.That this phrase with this spelling exists was a bit surprising. What I meant in the title is the dye used in contrast CTs.

Let’s back up just a bit so we can explain what a CT is. The Mayo Clinic at https://mayocl.in/3jujqdk tells us:

A computerized tomography (CT) scan combines a series of X-ray images taken from different angles around your body and uses computer processing to create cross-sectional images (slices) of the bones, blood vessels and soft tissues inside your body. CT scan images provide more-detailed information than plain X-rays do.”

I’ll be having one with contrast this afternoon. You know we, as CKD patients, have been warned not to allow that contrast into our bodies. Let’s find out why and then I’ll tell you why I am allowing it. The contrast is the dye in the title of today’s blog.

“In a CT scan, dense substances like bones are easy to see. But soft tissues don’t show up as well. They may look faint in the image. To help them appear clearly, you may need a special dye called a contrast material. They block the X-rays and appear white on the scan, highlighting blood vessels, organs, or other structures.Contrast materials are usually made of iodine or barium sulfate. You might receive these drugs in one or more of three ways:

  • Injection: The drugs are injected directly into a vein. This is done to help your blood vessels, urinary tract, liver, or gallbladder stand out in the image.
  • Orally: Drinking a liquid with the contrast material can enhance scans of your digestive tract, the pathway of food through your body.
  • Enema: If your intestines are being scanned, the contrast material can be inserted in your rectum.

After the CT scan, you’ll need to drink plenty of fluids to help your kidneys remove the contrast material from your body.”Thank you, WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/cancer/what-is-a-ct-scan#2 for the above information.

Of course, now we need to know why we shouldn’t be having this contrast material. Radiology Affiliates Imagining at https://4rai.com/blog/can-contrast-hurt-my-kidneys, a new site for me but one that seems very thorough, explains that we just don’t know for sure:

“…. Unhealthy kidneys, though, may be slower and less efficient when it comes to clearing the contrast from the blood. While the medical community has not yet determined exactly how contrast dye causes kidney problems, they think it has to do with this slow clearance of the dyes from the body.”

Well, what problems can contrast dye cause for our kidneys? I went right to the National Kidney Foundation at https://bit.ly/2YL7RXv  for an answer to this question

“What is Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN)?

CIN is a rare disorder and occurs when kidney problems are caused by the use of certain contrast dyes. In most cases contrast dyes used in tests, such as CT (computerized tomography) and angiograms, have no reported problems. About 2 percent of people receiving dyes can develop CIN. However, the risk for CIN can increase for people with diabetes, a history of heart and blood diseases, and chronic kidney disease (CKD)….The risk of CIN in people with both CKD and diabetes is 20 to 50 percent.

CIN is associated with a sharp decrease in kidney function over a period of 48-72 hours. The symptoms can be similar to those of kidney disease, which include feeling more tired, poor appetite, swelling in the feet and ankles, puffiness around the eyes, or dry and itchy skin. In many cases, CIN is reversible and people can recover. However, in some cases, CIN can lead to more serious kidney problems and possible heart and blood vessel problems

What is Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF)?

NSF is a rare but serious disease affecting skin and other organs that has been found in some patients with advanced CKD after exposure to gadolinium-containing contrast dyes that are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). NSF appears to affect about 4 percent of patients with advanced CKD. People with acute kidney injury (AKI) are also at higher risk. NSF has not been reported in people with mild kidney damage or normal kidney function.

NSF can be painful, debilitating, or even fatal. Symptoms and signs of NSF can include burning and itching of the skin, red or dark patches on the skin, joint stiffness, or muscle weakness. The disease can develop within 24 hours up to around 3 months….  delay in excretion [of this drug] is thought to be one the main reasons why NSF may happen.”

Notice that both possible effects of using contrast dye with kidney disease are rare.

So why am I having the contrast dye when I’ve been advised not to? My oncology team needs to see if the cancer has returned and, if it has, how badly. I told them at the beginning of my treatment to spare my kidneys as much as possible. But, in this case, I don’t want them to spare my kidneys so much that I end up dead of cancer.

There are two kinds of dye used, one less harmful to the kidneys than the other. I believe that’s the one that is used on me. It is also reduced in order to save me from any possible further kidney damage. Most importantly, my creatinine level is measured before administering the contrast dye. After a year and a half of this, my kidneys are doing just as well as they were doing before I started allowing contrast dye.

This is my story; remember, everyone is different and talk this over with your nephrologist before you agree to contrast dye. My nephrologist and I agreed that I needed to be alive more than I needed to save my kidneys.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Not Your New Age Crystals 

I was perusing the Facebook Chronic Kidney Disease online support groups as I usually do in the morning when I ran across a post that caught my eye. The person posting wanted to know if he were going to die because he had crystals in his urine. I’d never thought about that before. He sounded really scared, so I decided to take a look at this condition.

First of all, some basic information from Study.com at https://bit.ly/34n3W6H:

“Crystals in the urine is known as crystalluria. Sometimes crystals are found in healthy people and other times they are indicators of organ dysfunction, the presence of urinary tract stones of a like composition (known as urolithiasis), or an infection in the urinary tract.”

Ummm, I wanted a bit more information so I turned to Healthline.com at https://www.healthline.com/health/urine-crystals.

“Crystals can be found in the urine of healthy individuals. They may be caused by minor issues like a slight excess of protein or vitamin C. Many types of urine crystals are relatively harmless.

In some cases, however, urine crystals can be indicators of a more serious underlying condition. Symptoms that would indicate a more serious condition could include:

  • fever
  • severe abdominal pain
  • blood in the urine
  • jaundice
  • Fatigue”

Serious conditions? What does that mean? The organ dysfunction Study.com mentioned? Which organs? Urolithiasis? An infection? Can you die from any of these?

Time to slow down. Since this is a Chronic Kidney Disease blog, let’s start with the kidneys.

“Crystal-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is caused by the intratubular precipitation of crystals, which results in obstruction. Crystal-induced AKI most commonly occurs as a result of acute uric acid nephropathy and following the administration of drugs or toxins that are poorly soluble or have metabolites that are poorly soluble in urine …. Other drugs or medications may be metabolized to insoluble products such as oxalate (ethylene glycol, vitamin C), which are associated with precipitation of calcium oxalate crystals within tubular lumens and kidney injury.”

Thank you UptoDate.com at https://bit.ly/3j3BT0k for this information, although we’ll need some explanation in order to understand it. I get it that crystals can produce obstruction in the tubules (Wikipedia: The renal tubule is the portion of the nephron containing the tubular fluid filtered through the glomerulus), rather than being passed out of the body in the urine. It makes sense that if the crystals do produce obstruction, the urine may back up… right into the kidneys. That’s when you have the AKI. Remember, this in not chronic. The condition remains until it’s remedied, but it can be remedied.

What about urolithiasis? I must thank the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/hydronephrosis for their easily understood information about a condition called hydronephrosis which will explain how both urolithiasis and/or an infection would affect your kidneys.

“Hydronephrosis is the swelling of a kidney due to a build-up of urine. It happens when urine cannot drain out from the kidney to the bladder from a blockage or obstruction. (Gail here: such as the blockage caused by crystals which results in AKI.) Hydronephrosis can occur in one or both kidneys.

The main function of the urinary tract is to remove wastes and fluid from the body. The urinary tract has four parts: the kidneys, the ureters, the bladder and urethra. The urine is formed when the kidneys filter blood and remove excess waste materials and fluid. Urine collects into a part of the kidney called the renal pelvis. From the renal pelvis, the urine travels down a narrow tube called the ureter into the bladder. The bladder slowly fills up with urine, which empties from the body through another small tube called the urethra. Hydronephrosis occurs when there is either a blockage of the outflow of urine, or reverse flow of urine already in the bladder (called reflux) that can cause the renal pelvis to become enlarged.

Hydronephrosis may or may not cause symptoms. The main symptom is pain, either in the side and back (known as flank pain), abdomen or groin. Other symptoms can include pain during urination, other problems with urination (increased urge or frequency, incomplete urination, incontinence), nausea and fever. These symptoms depend on the cause and severity of urinary blockage.

How is Hydronephrosis Caused?
Hydronephrosis is usually caused by another underlying illness or risk factor. Causes of hydronephrosis include, but are not limited to, the following illnesses or risk factors:

  • Kidney stone
  • Congenital blockage (a defect that is present at birth)
  • Blood clot
  • Scarring of tissue (from injury or previous surgery)
  • Tumor or cancer (examples include bladder, cervical, colon, or prostate)
  • Enlarged prostate (noncancerous)
  • Pregnancy
  • Urinary tract infection (or other diseases that cause inflammation of the urinary tract)”

Kidney stones? MedicalNewsToday at https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/154193 helped us out with that one:

“Kidney stones are the result of a buildup of dissolved minerals on the inner lining of the kidneys.

They usually consist of calcium oxalate but may be composed of several other compounds.

Kidney stones can grow to the size of a golf ball while maintaining a sharp, crystalline structure.

The stones may be small and pass unnoticed through the urinary tract, but they can also cause extreme pain as they leave the body.”

There is quite a bit more information about kidneys stones at this site. What we needed to know is that, again, it’s a buildup – as in not passed from the body via the urine – that causes kidney stones.

Will the person who posted the comment about crystals in his urine die, whether or not he develops symptoms? It seems to me that’s not necessary IF he seeks treatment and follows medical advice.

Back to Healthline, but this time at https://www.healthline.com/health/urine-crystals#prevention, for their take on this question:

“Urine crystals that aren’t caused by underlying conditions like liver disease or genetic conditions can often be prevented. In some cases, even crystalluria triggered by genetic causes can be reduced with lifestyle or diet changes.

The most effective way to prevent urine crystals is to drink more water and stay hydrated. This helps dilute the chemical concentrations in the urine, preventing crystals from forming.

You can also make certain changes in your diet. Your doctor can help you determine what changes to make based on the type of crystals that you have. They may recommend cutting back on protein, for example, or reducing foods high in oxalate (as is the case for calcium oxalate crystals).

Avoiding salty foods can also help prevent a number of different urine crystals, so eliminating processed foods can be beneficial.”

I’m going to add today’s blog to the things-I-never-knew part of my brain.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

I’ve Been Compromised 

It’s true, and it’s not only me. It’s you, too, if you have Chronic Kidney Disease. ‘What do I mean?’ you ask. It’s your immune system that’s been compromised by your CKD. ‘HOW?’ you demand. That’s what today’s blog is going to explain.

Let’s start the usual way: at the beginning. So, what’s this immune system I mentioned? I turned to Medline Plus, a part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine which, in turn, is a division of the National Institutes of Health at https://medlineplus.gov/immunesystemanddisorders.html

“Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps your body to recognize these ‘foreign’ invaders. Then its job is to keep them out, or if it can’t, to find and destroy them.”

According to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/chronic-kidney-disease-and-pneumococcal-disease-do-you-know-facts,

“…Having kidney disease and kidney failure can weaken your immune system, making it easier for infections to take hold.  In fact, doctors and researchers have found that most infections, …, are worse in people with kidney disease.  People with a kidney transplant also have weakened immune systems.  This is because antirejection medicines (‘immunosuppressants’), which protect the body from rejecting the transplanted kidney, suppress the immune system.”

That makes sense. But exactly how does CKD compromise this system?

According to a British Society for Immunology study published in PubMed [“PubMed Central (PMC) is a free archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM),” as stated on their website. NCBI is The National Center for Biotechnology Information.] at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5904695/:

“The immune system and the kidneys are closely linked. In health the kidneys contribute to immune homeostasis, while components of the immune system mediate many acute forms of renal disease and play a central role in progression of chronic kidney disease. A dysregulated immune system can have either direct or indirect renal effects. Direct immune‐mediated kidney diseases are usually a consequence of autoantibodies directed against a constituent renal antigen, …. Indirect immune‐mediated renal disease often follows systemic autoimmunity with immune complex formation, but can also be due to uncontrolled activation of the complement pathways. Although the range of mechanisms of immune dysregulation leading to renal disease is broad, the pathways leading to injury are similar. Loss of immune homeostasis in renal disease results in perpetual immune cell recruitment and worsening damage to the kidney. Uncoordinated attempts at tissue repair, after immune‐mediated disease or non‐immune mediated injury, result in fibrosis of structures important for renal function, leading eventually to kidney failure.”

Hmmm, it seems my linking function is not working for this URL. No loss, just copy and paste the URL if you’d like to read more about the immune system and the kidneys.

There are a few medical terms in the above paragraph that you may need defined. Thank you, my all-time favorite dictionary, the Merriam-Webster, for helping us out here.

Antibodyany of a large number of proteins of high molecular weight that are produced normally by specialized B cells after stimulation by an antigen and act specifically against the antigen in an immune response, that are produced abnormally by some cancer cells, and that typically consist of four subunits including two heavy chains and two light chains

(https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/antibody)

Antigenany substance (such as an immunogen or a hapten [Gail here: Bing defines this as “a small molecule which, when combined with a larger carrier such as a protein, can elicit the production of antibodies which bind specifically to it (in the free or combined state.]) foreign to the body that evokes an immune response either alone or after forming a complex with a larger molecule (such as a protein) and that is capable of binding with a product (such as an antibody or T cell) of the immune response

(https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/antigen)

Autoantibodiesan antibody active against a tissue constituent of the individual producing it

(https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/autoantibodies)

Fibrosisa condition marked by increase of interstitial fibrous tissue [Gail here: That’s not much help. In a word, fibrosis means scarring.]

(https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fibrosis)

Renal: of, relating to, involving, or located in the region of the kidneys

(https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/renal)

Oh, boy. Now what? Can we build up our immune system? WebMD’s slide show  at https://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-strengthen-immunity offers some ways we can. To summarize this slide show:

  1. Avoid stress.
  2. Have sex more often (I love this one.)
  3. Get a pet.
  4. Be optimistic.
  5. Build your social network
  6. Laugh more.
  7. Eat colorful fruits and vegetables. (Within your kidney diet, of course.)
  8. Consider herbs and supplements. (Check with your nephrologist first.)
  9. Exercise.
  10. Sleep an adequate number of hours.
  11. Cut back on alcohol consumption.
  12. Stop smoking.
  13. Keep washing those hands.

Some doctors, such as  Dr. Suzanne Cassel, an immunologist at Cedars-Sinai, think we need to balance our immune systems rather than strengthen them. ” ‘You actually don’t want your immune system to be stronger, you want it to be balanced,’ Dr. Cassel says. ‘Too much of an immune response is just as bad as too little response.’

Dr. Cassel says most of the things people take to boost their immune system, such as vitamins or supplements, don’t have any effect on your immune response.”

Obviously, all doctors don’t agree. Whether you want to balance your immune system or strengthen it, the suggestions above will be helpful. Notice whether or not we’re in the middle of a pandemic, washing your hands frequently can help your immune system. Most of the suggestions from WebMD may be surprising to you since they are lifestyle changes and/or are the same ones suggested in general for CKD patients. There’s got to be something to them if they can both help with your CKD and your immune system. Why not try the suggestions you’re not already adhering to?

By the way, to the reader who asked why chocolate is not good for CKD patients, it’s loaded with potassium. In addition, many CKD patients also have diabetes. The sugar content in chocolate is not going to do them any good.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Getting Ready  

As I mentioned last week, I am lucky enough to be cancer free now and have returned to my other specialists. But we are experiencing the Covid-19 pandemic which means most of my doctors are conducting telemedicine appointments.

What are those? Let’s go to my favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, and see what we can see. I found this at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/telemedicine:

“the practice of medicine when the doctor and patient are widely separated using two-way voice and visual communication (as by satellite or computer)”

Surprisingly, I also discovered this has been in use since 1968. Maybe that’s why the phone and/or iPad type devices weren’t mentioned in the definition.

Of course, if you need to be examined physically, you’ll have to go to the doctor’s office. For example, poor Bear needed several mole biopsies last week. Obviously, he had to present himself at his dermatologist’s office to have these procedures carried out.

But I’ve been fortunate to be able to stick with telemedicine. Yet, you’ve got to be prepared for such doctor appointments. Do you have a thermometer? You’ll be asked for your temperature. We use both the DTT (digital temple thermometer) and Target’s talking thermometer (for those days when neither of us can find our glasses… really.) It seems the DTT we use is no longer manufactured, but the updated one is only about $15.00. The talking ear digital thermometer is more expensive. That one runs about double the price of the DTT. I did discover that digital mouth thermometers can be as low as $8.00. Non-digital oral thermometers start at about $6.00 You can compare prices online for the best deal. However, we are apparently old fashioned. The newest form of temperature assessment is the no contact digital scan thermometer. This one starts at about $50.

So, you have your temperature reading ready. What else will you need? I’ve always been asked for my blood pressure and pulse. I use an arm, rather than a wrist, device since my family doctor explained to me that the wrist device takes a reading through two bones. Those are the radius and ulna. The arm device takes your reading through only one bone, the humerus. She feels a reading through only one bone is more accurate. What device do I use? No matter which ones I’ve experimented with, I always return to Omron. It’s easy to use and accurate. These run from about $33 to over $100, depending upon how fancy you want to go. This description is from Amazon’s mid-price Omron:

Platinum (new version)

  • Trusted brand – Omron is the #1 recommended home blood pressure monitor brand by doctors and pharmacists for clinically-accurate home monitoring, and the #1 selling manufacturer of home blood pressure monitors for over 40 years.
  • Unlimited memory and users with the free app – The Omron gold wrist monitor stores 200 total blood pressure readings for 2 users (100 per user, most of any Omron wrist blood pressure monitor). Memory and users are unlimited with the Omron connect free app which works with amazon alexa-enabled devices (on select IOS & android devices).
  • High morning average indicator – Among Omron Amazon-exclusive blood pressure monitors, this feature is unique to the Gold and Platinum monitors. The indicator alerts the user if systolic or diastolic measurements are out of normal range in the morning, when there is a higher risk for heart attack or stroke.
  • Dual display with backlight – The Omron Platinum monitor features a backlit dual-display LCD monitor with easy navigation that allows the user to immediately compare the current reading to the previous reading. The backlight feature is only available with the Platinum Monitor.
  • AC adapter included – The Omron Ac Adapter eliminates the worry of changing batteries in your Omron Blood Pressure Monitor. The convenient AC adapter helps make sure your monitor is ready whenever you are.”

What else now? Let me think for a minute. Of course, if you are prediabetic or diabetic, you’ll be asked for your latest blood sugar readings. Believe it or not, I prefer WalMart’s no nonsense, no frills ReliOn Prime blood glucose monitor. In case you didn’t know, WalMart also operates as Sam’s Club. For my non-U.S.A. readers, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walmart, Walmart International operates in these countries:

Let’s keep in mind that anyone can edit in Wikipedia, so be certain to check before you bank upon going.

My family doctor did prescribe another brand which is a bit fancier in that it has a nicer looking case, lancet ejector, and meter. It was also more expensive and a prescription was needed.

If this is all new to you, you need to know you not only need this kit (which contains the monitor, a lancing device for your lancets, and spaces to store both your test strips and needles), but also the afore mentioned test strips and lancing device. You can buy 100 ultra-thin lancets for under $3.00. I suggest ultra-thin because I’ve found the thinner the lancet, the less the poke to get that one drop of blood needed for testing hurts.

The test strips are another story. These are expensive. They usually cost a little less than $18.00 for 100. And the lancing device? That’s about $6.00. The monitor itself is $9.00. The case comes with your starter kit. I haven’t found one sold separately by Walmart, although Amazon has a few for other brands. The number of times you need to test your blood glucose daily determines the weekly cost of your supplies.

You’ll also be asked for your height and weight. I have to admit I’m partial to digital devices and so have a digital scale from Amazon. Their scales run from $18.00 to $35.00. Of course, non-digital will be less expensive.

As for the height, I guess I cheated. I looked up the most recent height recorded on my last doctor’s appointment and used that.

Conclusion: You’ll need your temperature, blood pressure, height, weight, – if you’re prediabetic or diabetic – your blood glucose, and a phone, iPad sort of device, or computer for your telemedicine appointment.  Now you’re ready.

May you only have good results.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

I Can’t Eat That 

Now that I’m cancer free, I’ve resumed visits to all the other specialists (Isn’t growing older wonderful?) I had been seeing before the cancer diagnosis. One of these specialists was my immunologist, who had suggested I stop taking my allergy injections while I was doing chemotherapy since the chemo would change many of the conditions in my body. She was right. I no longer need the monthly injections for seasonal allergies, but there are certain foods I can no longer eat.

Why not, you may be asking yourself. Easy answer? I’m allergic to them. Wait just a minute here. What exactly does allergic mean and how will this affect your Chronic Kidney Disease?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/allergy tells us that allergy means,

“1altered bodily reactivity (such as hypersensitivity) to an antigen in response to a first exposure….

2exaggerated or pathological immunological reaction (as by sneezing, difficult breathing, itching, or skin rashes) to substances, situations, or physical states that are without comparable effect on the average individual

3medical practice concerned with allergies

4a feeling of antipathy or aversion”

It’s definition number two for us. Maybe an explanation of those monthly allergy injections would be helpful here, too. The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/allergy-shots/about/pac-20392876#:~:text=If%20you%20get%20weekly%20or,reaction%2C%20particularly%20a%20local%20reaction had the explanation we needed:

“Allergy shots are regular injections over a period of time — generally around three to five years — to stop or reduce allergy attacks. Allergy shots are a form of treatment called immunotherapy. [Gail here: Hence, the specialist who treats allergies is called an immunologist.] Each allergy shot contains a tiny amount of the specific substance or substances that trigger your allergic reactions. These are called allergens. Allergy shots contain just enough allergens to stimulate your immune system — but not enough to cause a full-blown allergic reaction.

Over time, your doctor increases the dose of allergens in each of your allergy shots. This helps get your body used to the allergens (desensitization). Your immune system builds up a tolerance to the allergens, causing your allergy symptoms to diminish over time.”

Lucky me: no more seasonal allergies. Let’s get back to those food allergies and CKD now… or not. While I found quite a bit of information about drug allergies, I found very little about food allergies. It’s nice to know my allergies to shellfish and vanilla will not harm my kidneys. Come to think of it, I don’t eat these foods because I’m allergic to them, so they’re not in my system anyway.

Hmmm, is it any different with food sensitivities? How’s about a definition first. It’s so nice to have a favorite dictionary. This is what The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sensitivity?utm_campaign=sd&utm_medium=serp&utm_source=jsonld has to say:

“the quality or state of being sensitive: such as

athe capacity of an organism or sense organ to respond to stimulation: IRRITABILITY

bthe quality or state of being hypersensitive

cthe degree to which a radio receiving set responds to incoming waves

dthe capacity of being easily hurt

eawareness of the needs and emotions of others”

Definition a is the one we need.

Again, I did not find enough validation that food sensitivities could damage our kidneys to write about it.

Maybe I’m looking at this backwards. Maybe it’s not do food sensitivities and allergies damage our kidneys that I should be dealing with, but rather can they cause kidney damage. Back to the internet. Will you look at that? Again, there was much more information about drug allergies damaging your kidneys and very little about food allergies or sensitivities.

I’ve satisfied myself that, just as with my food allergies, my sensitivity to lactose, wheat, fructose syrup, and acidic foods will not harm my kidneys. Although, they may cause me to read more food labels than I usually do. Hopefully, you’re satisfied that your food allergies and sensitivities will not harm your kidneys. If you’re still concerned, speak with your nephrologist or renal dietitian.

Of course, none of this means we can ignore the kidney diet. That is, not if you want to slow down the progression of the decline of your kidney function. Eat according to your labs. Keep watching your potassium, phosphorous, protein, and sodium restrictions. This is highly individualized, so again: speak with your nephrologist or renal dietitian should you have questions.

While we’re on the subject of food, do you remember when I wrote about Flavis? That’s the low sodium, low phosphorus, low potassium food company. Bear made a beef stew which we decided to eat upon a layer of pasta. We chose Flavis’s fusilli. That’s a kind of short, spiral pasta. I have got to say it was delicious. I like that it tastes so light, especially since I usually find pasta so heavy.   

News! I’ve gotten so many emails asking where readers can buy my books that I’ve made each title clickable. Click on the title and you go directly to the book’s page on Amazon.com. The titles are to the right of the blog itself on the blog roll.

I know, especially now in the time of Covid-19, that money can be an issue and even the $2.99 for the digital version of each of the books can be $2.99 too much. In that case, I suggest you request your library order the book and then you can borrow it for free. Even libraries that have shut down have virtual sites now. I do humbly request reviews from those of you who read the books. You can leave them on the Amazon.com page for each book. Thank you in advance.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Balloon sans Cake or Ice Cream

I am at Stage 3A, which is still pretty far from dialysis or End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD) which is usually Stage 5. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is staged by your Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR). This graphic will make it clear.

I don’t know very much about dialysis. However, I have heard of a fistula. I went to MedlinePlus, which is subdivision of the U.S. National Library of Medicine which, in turn, is a subdivision of the National Institutes of Health at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002365.htm for a formal definition of fistula.

“A fistula is an abnormal connection between two body parts, such as an organ or blood vessel and another structure. Fistulas are usually the result of an injury or surgery. Infection or inflammation can also cause a fistula to form.

Information

Fistulas may occur in many parts of the body. They can form between:

  • An artery and vein
  • Bile ducts and the surface of the skin (from gallbladder surgery)
  • The cervix and vagina
  • The neck and throat
  • The space inside the skull and nasal sinus
  • The bowel and vagina
  • The colon and surface of the body, causing feces to exit through an opening other than the anus
  • The stomach and surface of the skin
  • The uterus and peritoneal cavity (the space between the walls of the abdomen and internal organs)
  • An artery and vein in the lungs (results in blood not picking up enough oxygen in the lungs)
  • The navel and gut”

Now, look again at the first words in the list above: “an artery and vein.” That’s the way fistulas for dialysis are formed. But how?

“A vascular access is a hemodialysis patient’s lifeline, because it makes life-saving hemodialysis treatments possible. Hemodialysis is a treatment for kidney failure that uses a machine to send the patient’s blood through a filter, called a dialyzer, outside the body. The access is a surgically created vein used to remove and return blood during hemodialysis. The blood goes through a needle, a few ounces at a time. The blood then travels through a tube that takes it to the dialyzer. Inside the dialyzer, the blood flows through thin fibers that filter out wastes and extra fluid. The machine returns the filtered blood to the body through a different tube. A vascular access lets large amounts of blood flow continuously during hemodialysis treatments to filter as much blood as possible per treatment. About a pint of blood flows through the machine every minute. A vascular access should be in place weeks or months before the first hemodialysis treatment.”

Thank you to the University of California, San Francisco, Department of Surgery at https://surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/vascular-access-for-hemodialysis.aspx for even more useful information than I’d sought.

But now we need to know what hemodialysis is. The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/hemodialysis was a fount of knowledge for us (as it always is):

“When is dialysis needed?

You need dialysis if your kidneys no longer remove enough wastes and fluid from your blood to keep you healthy. This usually happens when you have only 10 to 15 percent of your kidney function left. [Gail here: that’s stage 5 or ESRD.] You may have symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, swelling and fatigue. However, even if you don’t have these symptoms yet, you can still have a high level of wastes in your blood that may be toxic to your body. Your doctor is the best person to tell you when you should start dialysis.

How does hemodialysis work?

Hemodialysis is a procedure where a dialysis machine and a special filter called an artificial kidney, or a dialyzer, are used to clean your blood. To get your blood into the dialyzer, the doctor needs to make an access, or entrance, into your blood vessels. This is done with minor surgery, usually to your arm. ….

How does the dialyzer clean my blood?

The dialyzer, or filter, has two parts, one for your blood and one for a washing fluid called dialysate. A thin membrane separates these two parts. Blood cells, protein and other important things remain in your blood because they are too big to pass through the membrane. Smaller waste products in the blood, such as urea, creatinine, potassium and extra fluid pass through the membrane and are washed away.”

By the way, hemodialysis is not the only kind of dialysis.

Got it? So what’s this about balloon? By this point, you’ve realized it’s not the kind you see at birthday parties as you see cake and ice cream. Someone I know is having this procedure. While talking it over, we realized neither of us knew how it was done or, on some levels, why it was even done. I decided we could both learn about it if I wrote about ballooning.

Well, will you look at that? Ballooning is really angioplasty. The Encarta Dictionary defines angioplasty as,

“a surgical operation to clear a narrowed or blocked artery”

That makes sense since a fistula connects an artery and a vein.

Let’s find out why how it’s done. I found a good explanation from Azura Vascular Care at https://www.azuravascularcare.com/infodialysisaccess/angioplasty-can-help-with-dialysis-access-complications/.

“An angioplasty is a way to fix a blood vessel that has become narrow.

  • If you need an angioplasty, an inflatable balloon will be inserted through the catheter.
  • The balloon is inflated where the narrowing is.
  • You may feel some discomfort when the balloon is inflated.
  • The angioplasty usually takes about 1 hour.
  • One stitch may be placed at the insertion site.
  • The stitch can be taken out the following morning or at your next dialysis treatment.”

Apparently, your artery can be too narrow before you start dialysis. Notice, the person I was speaking with has a fistula, not a catheter. The procedure is the same, except that the balloon is inserted via the fistula.

Well, what about after the angioplasty? This is from the Texas Heart Institute at https://www.texasheart.org/heart-health/heart-information-center/topics/vascular-access-for-hemodialysis/:

“Patients should avoid heavy lifting. Any injury to your arm can cause bleeding. When you go to the doctor, do not let anyone take your blood pressure, start an IV, or take blood from the arm with the A-V fistula or graft.”

Now I know, and so does the person I was speaking with… and so do you.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

We Know They Do, But How?

  • “aluminum- and calcium-containing antacids
  • anticonvulsants
  • calcium channel blockers
  • diuretics
  • iron supplements
  • narcotic pain medications
  • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease”

I ask you what do these drugs have in common. Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/what-does-constipation-feel-like#takeaway tells us they all may cause constipation.

This is one of those topics we don’t like to talk about, but have probably each experienced at one time or another. There are other causes of constipation, but today, we’ll stick with that caused by drugs. Mind you, we’re not talking about party drugs. Rather, it’s the drugs that are prescribed for you that may cause constipation which I’m writing about.

Well, how do you know if you have constipation? The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/constipation/symptoms-causes/syc-20354253 explains:

  • “Passing fewer than three stools a week
  • Having lumpy or hard stools
  • Straining to have bowel movements
  • Feeling as though there’s a blockage in your rectum that prevents bowel movements
  • Feeling as though you can’t completely empty the stool from your rectum
  • Needing help to empty your rectum, such as using your hands to press on your abdomen and using a finger to remove stool from your rectum”

According to the International Foundation of Gastrointestinal Disorders at https://www.iffgd.org/diet-treatments/medications/medications-that-can-affect-colonic-function.html,

“Constipation can be caused by a variety of medications. These medications affect the nerve and muscle activity in the large intestine (colon) and may also bind intestinal liquid. This may result in slowed colonic action (slow and/or difficult passing of stool).”

Let’s see if we can get more specific information on how constipation works. I went to Medscape at https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/184704-overview#a4 and discovered there are quite a few different kinds of constipation:

“The etiology [Gail here. That means the cause of the disease.] of constipation is usually multifactorial, but it can be broadly divided into two main groups …: primary constipation and secondary constipation.

Primary constipation

Primary (idiopathic, functional) constipation can generally be subdivided into the following three types:

Normal-transit constipation (NTC)

Slow-transit constipation (STC)

Pelvic floor dysfunction (ie, pelvic floor dyssynergia)

NTC is the most common subtype of primary constipation. Although the stool passes through the colon at a normal rate, patients find it difficult to evacuate their bowels. Patients in this category sometimes meet the criteria for IBS with constipation (IBS-C). The primary difference between chronic constipation and IBS-C is the prominence of abdominal pain or discomfort in IBS. Patients with NTC usually have a normal physical examination.

STC is characterized by infrequent bowel movements, decreased urgency, or straining to defecate. It occurs more commonly in female patients. Patients with STC have impaired phasic colonic motor activity. They may demonstrate mild abdominal distention or palpable stool in the sigmoid colon.

Pelvic floor dysfunction is characterized by dysfunction of the pelvic floor or anal sphincter. Patients often report prolonged or excessive straining, a feeling of incomplete evacuation, or the use of perineal or vaginal pressure during defecation to allow the passage of stool, or they may report digital evacuation of stool.”

We won’t be dealing with secondary constipation today since that doesn’t include drugs in its etiology.

What does happen in your body during constipation? This is what the Cleveland Clinic at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/4059-constipation has to say:

“Constipation happens because your colon absorbs too much water from waste (stool/poop), which dries out the stool making it hard in consistency and difficult to push out of the body.

To back up a bit, as food normally moves through the digestive tract, nutrients are absorbed. The partially digested food (waste) that remains moves from the small intestine to the large intestine, also called the colon. The colon absorbs water from this waste, which creates a solid matter called stool. If you have constipation, food may move too slowly through the digestive tract. This gives the colon more time – too much time – to absorb water from the waste. The stool becomes dry, hard, and difficult to push out.”

Imagine, drugs to improve your health taxing your health. Luckily, since you need to take the prescribed drugs to alleviate whatever your medical diagnosis is, there are methods to relieve your constipation. Here’s WebMD’s (https://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/constipation-relief-tips) advice:

“One way to keep things moving is by getting enough fiber in your diet, which makes stool bulkier and softer so it’s easier to pass. Gradually increase the amount of fiber in your diet until you’re getting at least 20 to 35 grams of fiber daily.

Good fiber sources include:

  • Bran and other whole grains found in cereals, breads, and brown rice
  • Vegetables such as Brussels sprouts, carrots, and asparagus
  • Fresh fruits, or dried fruits such as raisins, apricots, and prunes”
  • Beans

While you’re having an issue with constipation, limit foods that are high in fat and low in fiber, like cheese and other dairy products, processed foods, and meat. They can make constipation worse.

And on the subject of diet, water is important for preventing constipation, too. Try to drink at least 8 glasses of water a day.

Also, exercise regularly. Moving your body will keep your bowels moving, too.”

Wait a minute. We’re Chronic Kidney Disease patients. That’s means some of the foods listed above may not be allowed on our renal diets. For instance, dried raisin, apricots, and prunes are too high in potassium for CKD patients. You need to speak with your renal dietitian before changing your diet.

As Benjamin Franklin stated, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Let’s see what we can find on prevention.

  • Increasing your fiber intake: Fiber-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, all help improve gut function. If you have bowel sensitivity, you’ll want to avoid high-fructose fruits, such as apples, pears and watermelon, which can cause gas.
  • Getting more exercise: Regular exercise can help keep stool moving through the colon.
  • Drinking more water: Aim for eight glasses daily, and avoid caffeine, as it can be dehydrating.
  • Go when you feel like it: When you feel the urge to go, don’t wait.”

Thank you to Johns Hopkins Medicine at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/constipation-causes-and-prevention-tips for this information. Will you look at that? Prevention methods for constipation are almost the same as how to treat constipation. Better get started, folks.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

It’s Time  

Time for what, you ask. Time to talk about Covid-19 and your kidneys. I don’t really want to, and maybe you don’t, either. But this is a pandemic, so we must. Better to know than play ostrich.

By the way, my favorite dictionary, the Merriam Webster at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pandemic defines pandemic this way:

pandemic  adjective(Entry 1 of 2)

occurring over a wide geographic area and affecting an exceptionally high proportion of the population 

…..

pandemic noun (Entry 2 of 2)

an outbreak of a disease that occurs over a wide geographic area and affects an exceptionally high proportion of the populationa pandemic outbreak of a disease”

So much is unknown about the current pandemic, but it does look like Covid-19 lends itself to AKI (Acute Kidney Injury).

Let’s go back to this 1918 flu and see if we can find any kidney involvement there. I did, sort of. This study was published by Craig Garthwaite of the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland: The Effect of In-Utero Conditions on Long Term Health: Evidence from the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic. It deals with children of mothers who were pregnant during the 1918 Pandemic. You can find it at https://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/faculty/garthwaite/htm/fetal_stress_garthwaite_053008.pdf.

“Depending on the period of fetal development during which exposure occurred, individuals have a higher probability of developing coronary heart disease, diabetes, kidney disorders, or being in poor health…. When flu exposure is defined using particular quarters of birth, however, there is an approximately 23 percent increase in the probability of developing diabetes for individuals exposed to the flu during the first months of pregnancy.”

Diabetes is the number one cause of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). CKD is a kidney disorder.

Did you know that there were three other pandemics between the one in 1918 and today’s? I didn’t. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/basics/past-pandemics.html, they are

1957-1958 Pandemic (H2N2 virus) “The estimated number of deaths was 1.1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States.”

1968 Pandemic (H3N2 virus) “The estimated number of deaths was 1 million worldwide and about 100,000 in the United States.”

2009 H1N1 Pandemic (H1N1pdm09 virus) “… 12,469 deaths … in the United States…. Additionally, CDC estimated that 151,700-575,400 people worldwide died … during the first year the virus circulated.”

While these may seem like scary numbers, as of this past Saturday (and we know these numbers change daily), the World Health Organization (WHO) posted the following numbers:

“Total (new cases in last 24 hours)

Globally 12 322 395 cases (219 983) 556 335 deaths (5 286)”

You can check more data from WHO at https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200711-covid-19-sitrep-173.pdf?sfvrsn=949920b4_2.

The United States statistics?

“Coronavirus Cases:

3,355,646

Deaths:

137,403”

This is according to Worldometers at https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/.

It’s clear the pandemic is not done with us yet. People speak of the second wave coming. I live in Arizona and believe we are still in the first wave. I have no scientific proof for my belief, but our numbers keep going up without ever having gone down.

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/coronavirus/covid-19-information#can-covid-19-cause-kidney-failure-otherwise-healthy-adults gives us the insight we need into Covid-19 and our kidneys:

“Initial reports from Wuhan found approximately 3% to 9% of hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 developed an AKI. Incidence rates have now increased to 15% of hospitalized patients and 20% and higher in ICU patients with many requiring dialysis treatments. AKI appears to be a marker of COVID-19 infection severity and the mortality rate is higher for these patients.

Various COVID-19-related effects that are thought to contribute to AKI include kidney tubular injury (acute tubular necrosis) with septic shock, microinflammation, increased blood clotting, and probable direct infection of the kidney. Most patients with COVID-19-related AKI who recover continue to have low kidney function after discharge from the hospital.”

As usual, we need to back up a little here. AKI in not CKD (Here we are back in alphabet city.), although it may lead to CKD. While it may raise the death rate of Covid-19 patients, not all Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients and those with Covid-19 but not in the ICU develop AKI.

Acute tubular necrosis may be a new term for you. Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/acute-tubular-necrosis explains it for lay folks like you and me:

“Inside your kidneys are small tube-shaped structures that remove salt, excess fluids, and waste products from your blood. When these tubules are damaged or destroyed, you develop acute tubular necrosis (ATN), a type of acute kidney injury. The damage may result in acute kidney failure.”

This past weekend I received this invitation from the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) and George Washington University which you may find useful for yourself:

“Over the course of the past three months, you’ve joined AAKP and some of our allied experts in one of our nine COVID-19 webinars.

(Gail here: Go to their webinars. They’re a good way to read more about Covid-19 and your kidneys.)

We’re now pleased to invite you to pre-register to join our 2nd Annual Global Summit entitled, Global Kidney Innovations – Expanding Patient Choices & Outcomes, hosted in partnership with the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

This year’s summit focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on kidneys and kidney patients (Gail again: I purposely italicized that part of this sentence.) as well as key innovations in kidney care. All registration fees have been dropped to allow the broadest possible audience of frontline medical professionals, researchers, and kidney patients.

Join us for immediate access to key insights related to COVID-19 and risks to kidney patients! Beyond COVID-19, the agenda focuses on emerging innovation and research to care for kidney diseases, including diversity in clinical trials; precision medicine; genetic conditions such as APOL1; emerging research in the areas of early disease diagnosis and artificial intelligence; novel therapies in transplantation including wearable and artificial implantable devices; and advancements in home dialysis care.

Virtual Summit Event Dates: July 16-17, 2020

If you’re interested in this timely, free summit to learn more about your kidneys and Covid-19 – and/or for any of the other topics – you can register at https://aakp.org/programs-and-events/2nd-annual-global-summit-global-kidney-innovations-expanding-patient-choices-outcomes/.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

How Sweet It Isn’t

Hello again. Last week when I was writing about Bipolar Disorder and Chronic Kidney Disease, I mentioned nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. During the week I realized how little I know about that.

Let’s start by going back and reviewing what I wrote last week:

“What is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus?
The most common problem from taking lithium is a form of diabetes due to kidney damage called nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. This type of diabetes is different than diabetes mellitus caused by high blood sugar. In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the kidneys cannot respond to anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), a chemical messenger that controls fluid balance. This results in greater than normal urine out-put and excessive thirst. It can be hard to treat nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.”

Frankly, that’s not enough information for me, although it’s pretty clear. Former English teacher here. Let’s take a look at the words themselves. Keep in mind, this is what I learned along the years.

Nephro = kidneys

Genic = Beginning in

So we know this disease begins in the kidneys. And diabetes? According to Michigan State University at https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/how_diabetes_got_its_name,

“The ancient Greek word for diabetes means, ‘passing though; a large discharge of urine.’ The meaning is associated with frequent urination, which is a symptom of diabetes.”

And finally insipidus. I found myself turning to Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes_insipidus#:~:text=”Insipidus”%20comes%20from%20Latin%20language,or%20zest%3B%20not%20tasty for help with this.

” ‘Insipidus’ comes from Latin language insipidus (tasteless), from Latin: in- ‘not’ + sapidus ‘tasty’ from sapere ‘have a taste’ — the full meaning is ‘lacking flavor or zest; not tasty’.”

This one I didn’t quite get. Back to the above link to figure out what tasteless has to do with this disease.

“Application of this name to DI arose from the fact that diabetes insipidus does not cause glycosuria (excretion of glucose into the urine).”

Ah, so the urine is not sweet. Reminder: Diabetes can be diagnosed by the doctor tasting the urine. While this was more common in the 1600s, I have read about doctors tasting urine for diabetes more recently and even currently. If the urine is sweet, diabetes is present.

This is interesting. I’d never considered a form of diabetes that didn’t deal with blood glucose, which may also be called blood sugar, so sweet. Of course, I then began to wonder if taking lithium was the only way to develop this disease. The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes-insipidus/symptoms-causes/syc-20351269#:~:text=Nephrogenic%20diabetes%20insipidus%20occurs%20when,or%20a%20chronic%20kidney%20disorder was quite a bit of help here:

“Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus occurs when there’s a defect in the kidney tubules — the structures in your kidneys that cause water to be excreted or reabsorbed. This defect makes your kidneys unable to properly respond to ADH.

The defect may be due to an inherited (genetic) disorder or a chronic kidney disorder. Certain drugs, such as lithium or antiviral medications such as foscarnet (Foscavir), also can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.”

This is a lot of new information to understand unless we get more help. Let’s take a look at kidney tubules now. I turned to my old favorite Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/human-body-maps/kidney#nephrons and found the following:

“Each tubule has several parts:

  • Proximal convoluted tubule. This section absorbs water, sodium, and glucose back into the blood.
  • Loop of Henle. This section further absorbs potassium, chloride, and sodium into the blood.
  • Distal convoluted tubule. This section absorbs more sodium into the blood and takes in potassium and acid.

By the time fluid reaches the end of the tubule, it’s diluted and filled with urea. Urea is byproduct of protein metabolism that’s released in urine.”

That makes sense, but what about this ADH? What is that?  My Health Alberta Ca at https://myhealth.alberta.ca/Health/pages/conditions.aspx?hwid=hw211268 tells us:

“Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is a chemical produced in the brain that causes the kidneys to release less water, decreasing the amount of urine produced. A high ADH level causes the body to produce less urine. A low level results in greater urine production.

Normally, the amount of ADH in the body is higher during the night. This helps prevent urination while you are sleeping. But if the levels of ADH remain low during the night, the body will produce large amounts of urine, so urination during the night is more likely.”

We know how you can develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, but how do you treat it once you’ve been diagnosed? WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/nephrogenic-diabetes-insipidus-symptoms-causes-and-treatments offers us the following:

“If a drug like lithium is responsible, switching medicines might improve nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

Most adults with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus are able to keep up with fluid losses by drinking water. For some people, though, the symptoms of near-constant thirst and urination can become intolerable. Some treatments can reduce the symptoms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, at least somewhat:

All adults and children with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus should take frequent bathroom breaks. This helps to avoid over-distending the bladder, which can cause long-term problems, though rarely.

The most important treatment for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is to ensure constant access to lots of water. Not keeping up with fluid losses can lead to dehydration or electrolyte imbalances, which can sometimes be severe. Seek medical help if symptoms don’t improve after rehydrating, eating fresh fruit, and taking a multivitamin.”

Now, the biggie…. Is this rare disease curable? Unfortunately it isn’t, although,

“For individuals with acquired NDI treating the underlying cause (e.g., correcting metabolic imbalances or discontinuing drug use) can reverse the kidneys resistance to vasopressin. [Gail here again: Vasopressin is another name for ADH as far as I can tell.] However, this reversal may take weeks. In some cases caused by the use of drugs such as lithium, it may take years for the kidneys to respond to vasopressin again or it can become irreversible.”

Thank you to National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD) at https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/nephrogenic-diabetes-insipidus/ for the above information.

I feel like I’ve been down the rabbit hole with Alice with all this new information about a rare disease that your already existing kidney disease may cause. Hopefully, you won’t be one of its victims.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Bipolar Disorder and Chronic Kidney Disease

It turns out I know more people with bipolar disorder than I’d thought. Of course, that led me to wonder again what, if anything, this might have to do with CKD. That’s just the way my mind works. Everything – and I do mean everything – leads back to CKD for me. So, as usual, I started asking them questions and poking around on the internet.

It seems that most of them are taking lithium to help control the bipolar disorder. Okay, I’ll bite: what is lithium? Drugs.com at https://www.drugs.com/lithium.html has quite a lot to say about this drug, but I’ll start with the basic definition:

Lithium affects the flow of sodium through nerve and muscle cells in the body. Sodium affects excitation or mania.

Lithium a mood stabilizer that is a used to treat or control the manic episodes of bipolar disorder (manic depression). Manic symptoms include hyperactivity, rushed speech, poor judgment, reduced need for sleep, aggression, and anger.

Lithium also helps to prevent or lessen the intensity of manic episodes.”

Notice sodium is mentioned. Keep that in mind while we backtrack for a definition of bipolar disorder. It seems I jumped right in without giving you some of the necessary background information. I’ll rectify that right now.

The National Institute of Mental Health at https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/bipolar-disorder/index.shtml tells us:

“Bipolar disorder (formerly called manic-depressive illness or manic depression) is a mental disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, concentration, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.

There are three types of bipolar disorder. All three types involve clear changes in mood, energy, and activity levels. These moods range from periods of extremely ‘up,’ elated, irritable, or energized behavior (known as manic episodes) to very ‘down,’ sad, indifferent, or hopeless periods (known as depressive episodes). Less severe manic periods are known as hypomanic episodes.

  • Bipolar I Disorder— defined by manic episodes that last at least 7 days, or by manic symptoms that are so severe that the person needs immediate hospital care. Usually, depressive episodes occur as well, typically lasting at least 2 weeks. Episodes of depression with mixed features (having depressive symptoms and manic symptoms at the same time) are also possible.
  • Bipolar II Disorder— defined by a pattern of depressive episodes and hypomanic episodes, but not the full-blown manic episodes that are typical of Bipolar I Disorder.
  • Cyclothymic Disorder (also called Cyclothymia)— defined by periods of hypomanic symptoms as well as periods of depressive symptoms lasting for at least 2 years (1 year in children and adolescents). However, the symptoms do not meet the diagnostic requirements for a hypomanic episode and a depressive episode.

Sometimes a person might experience symptoms of bipolar disorder that do not match the three categories listed above, which is referred to as ‘other specified and unspecified bipolar and related disorders’ .”

In the July 3rd, 2017, blog, I wrote about those who already have CKD and then develop bipolar disorder.

“Kidney.org at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/lithium has me downright frightened for my friend…

“How does lithium cause kidney damage?
Lithium may cause problems with kidney health. Kidney damage due to lithium may include acute (sudden) or chronic (long-term) kidney disease and kidney cysts. The amount of kidney damage depends on how long you have been taking lithium. It is possible to reverse kidney damage caused by lithium early in treatment, but the damage may become permanent over time.

What is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus?
The most common problem from taking lithium is a form of diabetes due to kidney damage called nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. This type of diabetes is different than diabetes mellitus caused by high blood sugar. In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the kidneys cannot respond to anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), a chemical messenger that controls fluid balance. This results in greater than normal urine out-put and excessive thirst. It can be hard to treat nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.”

As we can see, this is not the first time I’ve written about a dual diagnose of these two diseases – one mental, one physical – and how they affect each other. One of the interesting facts I found is that you need to tell your doctor if you have kidney disease when he prescribes lithium. None of my friends has CKD yet, although one is under surveillance (if that’s the proper word) since she’s having some decline in her eGFR.

Remember I asked you to keep that sodium reference in mind? One problem with lithium is that it requires you to include sodium in your diet. As a CKD patient, you’re asked to limit your sodium intake. You can’t do both at once. This is from WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/bipolar-disorder/guide/bipolar-disorder-lithium#2:

“Tell your doctor about history of cancerheart diseasekidney diseaseepilepsy, and allergies. Make sure your doctor knows about all other drugs you are taking. Avoid products that are low in sodium (salt) since a low sodium diet can lead to excessively high lithium levels.

So what can you do to protect your kidneys if you must take lithium for your mental health? This is what Psychiatric Times at https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/6-ways-protect-kidneys-while-prescribing-lithium has to say about the subject:

Tip 1. Avoid toxicity

The link between lithium and renal dysfunction may be explained by exposure to toxic lithium levels. Toxic levels kill renal cells, and that damage builds up every time the level rises above the toxic line….

Tip 2. Keep the level low

Keeping the lithium level as low as possible can prevent renal impairment. The ideal level needs to be personalized and tends to fall with age….

Tip 3. Dose lithium once a day

Dosing lithium once in the evening reduces the risk of renal problems….

If high serum levels are needed to treat active mania, dosing twice a day may be necessary to avoid toxic peaks. The line of toxicity is different for each patient because it’s defined by symptoms.…

Tip 4. Drinking and urinating too much

Polyuria and polydipsia are common adverse effects of lithium (30% to 80%), and they are not always benign. When severe, they may indicate nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which means that changes in the renal tubules are impeding the kidneys ability to concentrate the urine. Those changes raise the risk of future renal impairments.

Besides stopping lithium, the main treatment for NDI is amiloride, a potassium sparing diuretic (5 mg po qd). Amiloride may prevent further renal problems by reducing fibrotic changes in the kidneys…. This medication is best managed through consultation with the medical team because it carries a risk of hyperkalemia, particularly in patients with renal insufficiency or diabetes.

Tip 5. Consider N-Acetylcysteine

N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is an antioxidant that can protect and even reverse renal toxicity, including toxicity from lithium…. NAC is part of a healthy diet, and the capsule form is safe, well-tolerated (the main risk is constipation), and inexpensive. Sounds like a winner, but there is one catch. The renal studies…were all done in animals.

However, there is another reason to use NAC in bipolar disorder. This supplement is effective for bipolar depression in some, but not all, studies… and those benefits are more pronounced in the medically ill….

The dose in bipolar disorder (2000 mg/day) is about twice the amount that was used for renal protection (10 mg/kg)….

Tip 6. Measure

Renal function should be monitored every 3 to 6 months on lithium. Older patients benefit from more frequent monitoring, as do those with a history of toxicity, high serum levels, or drug interactions. Creatinine is usually sufficient, but a more accurate measure of renal function is the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)….

Laboratory changes that should prompt a nephrology consult include:

  • eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73m2
  • Creatinine ≥ 1.5 mg/dL
  • A decline of eGFR by more than 4 ml/min/1.73m… per year….”

There’s more, much more, on this site if you’re interested.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

A Different Kind of App  

Periodically for the last decade, I’ve written about apps that could help us manage our Chronic Kidney Disease. They would be those with electrolyte counters, portion counters, GFR calculators, and even calorie counters or exercise counters. They were helpful. Some still exist; some have gone by the wayside.

In recent years, I’ve been vocal about the necessity for CKD patients to understand what our disease is, how it came to be, and what we might do about it. This is different from wanting people to be aware of CKD. My contention is that the educated patient is the one most able to help him or herself.

Responsum for CKD does just that, but I’ll let them explain their app themselves. This is from their April 28th blog at https://responsumhealth.com/great-news-for-the-ckd-community/.

“I have great news to share with Responsum Health’s extended family of supporters and everyone around the world whose lives are affected by kidney disease. Responsum Health, with support from Otsuka Pharmaceutical, is launching a new platform and app designed specifically for people with kidney disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD)—a condition that affects 37 million Americans.

Responsum for CKD represents our company’s second disease-specific platform—the first being Responsum for PF—and includes some amazing new features. These include a translation function into seven languages and a dynamic social wall called Community Chat, which automatically suggests articles and resources based upon each comment or entry. Just like with pulmonary fibrosis, Responsum for CKD will be available as a free web-based platform and a mobile app for iOS and Android.

We’ve recruited an all-star Content Advisory Council made up of some of the top specialists in CKD to serve as our content validators. Instead of partnering with a specific patient advocacy group to vet our content, we chose this approach to ensure that the platform is free of commercial bias. We will roll out the names of our esteemed council alongside the app launch.

To the CKD community, Responsum Health is on the way! We can’t wait to serve you, join you, learn from you, and listen to you.

Let’s get started!

Andy Rosenberg
Founder and CEO, Responsum Health

Perhaps we could use a bit more information. Let’s try their May 5th press release at https://responsumhealth.com/press-and-media/responsum-health-launches-innovative-kidney-disease-information-platform/.

“Responsum Health Launches Innovative Kidney Disease Information Platform
New technology supports patients, families, caregivers, and healthcare professionals

​[WASHINGTON, D.C., May 28 2020] — Today, Responsum Health (Responsum), an innovative developer of personalized patient apps and chronic disease knowledge communities, with support from Otsuka Pharmaceutical, a global healthcare company, announced the launch of an online connection and knowledge platform for patients with kidney disease, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), a condition that affects an estimated 37 million Americans. The platform, called Responsum for CKD, can be accessed for free via web browser or mobile app.

Designed to meet the needs of patients, families, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, Responsum for CKD offers a number of informational and community-oriented features. At its core, Responsum replaces unreliable web aggregators and social sites by providing patients and caregivers with a customized Newsfeed that has easy-to-read summaries of important kidney health news items. All of the information found on Responsum’s platforms is written by professional health writers and vetted by a team of researchers under the guidance of an advisory council, which is made up of leading kidney health experts.

Other features include a moderated social wall to serve as a community chat room and the Patient One-Sheet, which allows patients to easily collect, download, print, and share their key medical information. Patients will also have access to a robust collection of trusted patient support links.

“We are grateful that Otsuka is willing to support our mission to educate, support, and empower patients with chronic conditions through our unique approach to providing patients with the information they need to drive better outcomes,” said Andrew Rosenberg, founder of Responsum Health. “By working with recognized leaders from the patient advocacy community, we have created a trusted online platform that fills a vital information gap—while simultaneously creating an authentic, welcoming online community for people with kidney disease.”

About Responsum Health

Responsum Health’s mission is to build and support online knowledge communities for chronic disease patients. The company offers a free, revolutionary patient engagement platform that monitors, searches, and curates the Internet to generate a personalized news feed of article summaries, which are vetted by Responsum’s patient group partners. Responsum wraps the news feed into a comprehensive platform that enables patients to comment on and rate the articles, as well as share them with their professional care team and loved ones. Responsum also enables patients to better organize their health information, find local patient support groups and services, and support one another through a moderated, disease-specific social wall.”

The one thing that has been missing from other CKD apps is the education. I write to help people become aware of CKD and maybe understand a little bit of what affects you as a CKD patient. Responsum has articles in real time, so to speak. What I mean by that is if you’re interested in potassium and ask a question in the community about it, you also have articles attached that will explain more about your topic: no searching, no delay, just click on the upper right hand corner. How marvelous.

I think I’ve mentioned that I’ve been involved in what we used to call think tanks about what CKD patients need. My answer has always been education… and what could be better than immediate education? The one sheet with your medical information is also a boon, but not specific to only this app.

But the community with instant articles about your topic? Priceless. I would say that it’s free is also priceless, but that’s a little bit obvious. Do I recommend this app? Yes. Do I use this app? Yes… and if asked my opinion, I would say you should use it, too. The key to our kidney health just may be self-education.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Echo… Echo… Echo…

Remember that golden time I’ve mentioned before? The time when I problem solve and write in my head just as I’m waking up? Well, today the word was echo at that time. Echo? As in echo chamber? Echo Canyon? No, doesn’t feel right. Got it! Echocardiogram.

The English teacher in me is already delighted. Why? I know what most of the word means through my college study of Greek and Latin roots. Card means heart, io is simply a connective, and gram means write. What about echo you ask? I think we all know what that means in common usage, but in conjunction with cardiogram? Yep, time for some help.

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, still my favorite, at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ echocardiography tells us an echocardiogram is,

“the use of ultrasound to examine the structure and functioning of the heart for abnormalities and disease”

Let’s put in a little reminder of what an ultrasound is here. This is from MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5897:

“A test in which high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off tissues and the echoes are converted into a picture (sonogram).”

Oh, like the picture of my grandson growing in his mom’s womb. Great, now what does this have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease? I just had an echocardiogram because my oncologist was concerned about the great distance between my diastolic (lower) and systolic (upper) numbers on my blood pressure readings. It was fine, but it did get me to thinking about what CKD and the heart have in common.

Here’s a reminder from Healthline at https://www.healthline.com/health/diastole-vs-systole#:~:text=Your%20systolic%20blood%20pressure%20is,bottom%20number%20on%20your%20reading of what the two numbers mean:

“Your systolic blood pressure is the top number on your reading. It measures the force of blood against your artery walls while your ventricles — the lower two chambers of your heart — squeeze, pushing blood out to the rest of your body.

Your diastolic blood pressure is the bottom number on your reading. It measures the force of blood against your artery walls as your heart relaxes and the ventricles are allowed to refill with blood. Diastole — this period of time when your heart relaxes between beats — is also the time that your coronary artery is able to supply blood to your heart.”

Got it. This next quote is a little medicalese, but basically it’s saying there are specific difficulties if you have both CKD and high blood pressure. It’s from Kidney International at https://www.kidney-international.org/article/S0085-2538(19)30276-5/fulltext :

“In CKD and ESKD, risk factors for HF include long-standing hypertension with often worsened blood pressure (BP) control as CKD worsens, salt and water retention causing excessive preload, and cardiomyopathic factors including left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and fibrosis. In addition, there are CKD- and ESKD-specific factors that affect afterload (increased arterial stiffness and high output shunting through arteriovenous fistulae or grafts) as well as load-independent factors (neurohormonal activation, impaired iron utilization, anemia, demand ischemia, profibrotic factors [e.g., fibroblast growth factor 23 {FGF-23}], inflammation, etc.)…. Arteriovenous fistulae or grafts have been reported to worsen right ventricular hypertrophy, increase pulmonary pressures, associate with significant right ventricular dilatation, and reduce right ventricular function, which are closely linked to survival….”

An echocardiogram can show in real time if all the ventricles of your heart are working correctly as far as pumping blood and and/or leaking when your heart should be at rest.

Well, why get an echocardiogram if you already know you have CKD and high blood pressure? Here’s WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/diagnosing-echocardiogram#4’s response.  You can find much more information there, too, as is true of all the sites mentioned.

“An echocardiogram can help your doctor diagnose several kinds of heart problems, including:

  • An enlarged heart or thick ventricles (the lower chambers)
  • Weakened heart muscles
  • Problems with your heart valves
  • Heart defects that you’ve had since birth
  • Blood clots or tumors”

Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/echocardiogram/about/pac-20393856 offers an easily understandable explanation of the actual process. There are many types of echocardiograms, but this is the most usual.

Transthoracic echocardiogram

In this standard type of echocardiogram:

  • A technician (sonographer) spreads gel on a device (transducer).
  • The sonographer presses the transducer firmly against your skin, aiming an ultrasound beam through your chest to your heart.
  • The transducer records the sound wave echoes from your heart.
  • A computer converts the echoes into moving images on a monitor.”

This is yet another reminder of why we need to have both the heart and kidneys functioning well. This one is from Heart.org at https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/health-threats-from-high-blood-pressure/how-high-blood-pressure-can-lead-to-kidney-damage-or-failure#:~:text=The%20:

  • Damaged kidney arteries do not filter blood well. Kidneys have small, finger-like nephrons that filter your blood. Each nephron receives its blood supply through tiny hair-like capillaries, the smallest of all blood vessels. When the arteries become damaged, the nephrons do not receive the essential oxygen and nutrients — and the kidneys lose their ability to filter blood and regulate the fluid, hormones, acids and salts in the body.
  • Damaged kidneys fail to regulate blood pressure. Healthy kidneys produce a hormone called aldosterone to help the body regulate blood pressure. Kidney damage and uncontrolled high blood pressure each contribute to a negative spiral. As more arteries become blocked and stop functioning, the kidneys eventually fail.”

The American Journal of Kidney Disease at https://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(18)30598-5/fulltext gives us these final words on why an echocardiogram could be necessary for certain CKD patients:

“Abnormal cardiac structure and function are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and linked with mortality and heart failure.”

Topic change: We tried Flavis’s high protein spaghetti and found it just as light and delightful as their penne. This, I can endorse.

Oh, before I forget. I like to read… a lot. One of the books I read recently was Ray Flynt’s Transplanted Death. I don’t want to tell you too much about it, except that it is a well-written murder mystery with a good story that revolves around transplant recipients, two of them kidney recipients. I am recommending this book.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!