Taming the Wild Weed

I know someone who is a kidney donor. That’s actually how we met. I went to a conference to learn what I could learn and she was there at the invitation of the presenters. I was drawn to her right away not knowing who she was or why she was there… something about her magnetic personality, I think. That was years ago and since then I’ve attended her social media workshop and followed her closely on Instagram. Now she’s involved with medical marijuana. That got me to thinking.

So I did a little searching. Back in 2013, the National Kidney Foundation answered a reader’s question in their Ask the Doctor blog by responding more to the smoking than the marijuana:
“Smoking is not good for any person. Smoking is not safe for any person. I know of no specific ill effects of marijuana on the kidney.”

It seemed to me something must have been discovered about medical marijuana and chronic kidney disease in the last four years, so I kept digging and found this 2014 article from Phoenix New Times at http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/arts/can-i-get-a-medical-marijuana-card-for-chronic-kidney-disease-6577499:

“Medical-grade cannabis can help with pain management, but there are still alternating schools of thought as to whether weed helps or hurts the kidneys. Claims that marijuana injures the kidneys often point to smoking as a damaging factor, but there are alternative methods of ingesting cannabis, including vaporizing, tinctures, and infusing the drug into food.

Additionally, a joint study by the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta concluded that, ‘Even small improvements in symptoms with the use of THC: CBD [cannabinoids, the active ingredients in cannabis] in patients with difficult-to-treat symptoms may be clinically meaningful.’

It seems, if you avoid smoking it, much more evidence exists that cannabis can help with the side effects of CRD, including nausea, loss of appetite, and weight loss.”

CRD means Chronic Renal Disease, an alternative name for CKD.

Well, that’s a bit more informative, but still, three years old. By now I was curious to know how marijuana worked in the first place. United Patients Group at https://unitedpatientsgroup.com/resources/how-medical-marijuana-works had the answer and the date on their site was only last year.

“Major Cannabinoids in Medical Marijuana

What THC Is and Its Effects

THC stands for delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol. It is probably the best known cannabinoid present in medical marijuana. Physically it acts as a muscle relaxant and anti-inflammatory and psychologically it acts as a stimulant. This makes medical marijuana strains high in THC a good choice for patients who need relief while also to remain alert and active.

THC in medical marijuana acts in the following ways:
• anti-epileptic
• anti-inflammatory
• anti-depressant
• stimulates appetite
• lowers blood pressure
• apoptosis (self induced cell death)

What CBD Is and Its Effects

CBD stands for cannabidiol. Cannabidiol actually reduces the psychological effects of medical marijuana. For most patients, a strain that has high THC and high cannabidiol will have fewer “mental” effects and more physical ones. High cannabidiol medical marijuana strains, like Blueberry and Harlequin, are especially effective for illnesses with strong physical symptoms.

Cannabidiol’s effects include:
• reduced pain
• reduced anxiety
• reduced nausea
• sedative effects
• anti-convulsive
• anti-schizophrenic
• arrests the spread of cancer

What CBN Is and Its Effects

CBN is cannabinol, not to be confused with Cannabidiol. Cannabinol is very similar to THC, but has less psychological effects. It is produced as THC breaks down within the medical marijuana plant. High THC will make cannabinol’s effects stronger, and very high cannabinol concentrations can produce undesirably strong head highs.

Cannabinol levels tend to be high in medical marijuana strains like Strawberry Haze and Blue Rhino, which can be particularly helpful for:
• lowering pressure in the eye (such as with glaucoma)
• analgesic
• anti-seizure

What CBC Is and Its Effects

CBC stands for cannabichromene. Cannabichromene’s main action is to enhance the effects of THC. High cannabichromene levels will make a high-THC medical marijuana strain much more potent.

Cannabichromene working together with THC is known to be a:
• sedative
• analgesic
• anti-inflammatory

What CBG Is and Its Effects

CBG is an abbreviation for cannabigerol. Cannabigerol has no psychological effects on its own, and is not usually found in high amounts in most medical marijuana. Scientists believe that cannabigerol is actually one of the oldest forms of cannabinoids, meaning it is essentially a “parent” to the other cannabinoids found in medical marijuana. It also has anti-microbial properties.

Cannabigerol has physical effects such as:
• lowering pressure in the eye
• anti-inflammatory
• sedative
• sleep assistance

Combining Strains

Alone, none of the five major cannabinoids are as effective as when they work together. These five cannabinoids also work with the minor compounds in marijuana, and this is probably one reason that medical marijuana replacements like Marinol do not work very well.

Professional medical marijuana growers can analyze their medical marijuana strains to breed and grow medication for patients with the desired range of levels of each major cannabinoid. Using this knowledge of what each compound does helps medical marijuana pharmacists, or budtenders, find the right combination for patients to treat specific conditions and find maximum relief.”

I am not at a point where I would consider medical marijuana since my only symptoms are occasional brain fog and tiredness. Should I be experiencing the kind of pain some CKD users do, I would revisit this decision but I’d have to keep in mind that using this substance could hurt my chances of a transplant.

According to Joshua L. Rein, DO and Christina M. Wyatt, MD of the Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY as stated in their research study at http://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(17)30810-7/, as of this year:

“Twenty-nine US states have established medical marijuana programs, 8 of which have also legalized recreational marijuana, and Canada is expected to legalize recreational marijuana in 2018. Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are chronic conditions with significant associated morbidity and mortality.”

Don’t get confused. Medical marijuana is not a cure for CKD and is not suggested as one. However, should you have need of pain relief, it may offer you some… IF you live in a place where it is legal and IF your doctor thinks it’s a good option for you.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!