Getting Ready  

As I mentioned last week, I am lucky enough to be cancer free now and have returned to my other specialists. But we are experiencing the Covid-19 pandemic which means most of my doctors are conducting telemedicine appointments.

What are those? Let’s go to my favorite dictionary, The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, and see what we can see. I found this at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/telemedicine:

“the practice of medicine when the doctor and patient are widely separated using two-way voice and visual communication (as by satellite or computer)”

Surprisingly, I also discovered this has been in use since 1968. Maybe that’s why the phone and/or iPad type devices weren’t mentioned in the definition.

Of course, if you need to be examined physically, you’ll have to go to the doctor’s office. For example, poor Bear needed several mole biopsies last week. Obviously, he had to present himself at his dermatologist’s office to have these procedures carried out.

But I’ve been fortunate to be able to stick with telemedicine. Yet, you’ve got to be prepared for such doctor appointments. Do you have a thermometer? You’ll be asked for your temperature. We use both the DTT (digital temple thermometer) and Target’s talking thermometer (for those days when neither of us can find our glasses… really.) It seems the DTT we use is no longer manufactured, but the updated one is only about $15.00. The talking ear digital thermometer is more expensive. That one runs about double the price of the DTT. I did discover that digital mouth thermometers can be as low as $8.00. Non-digital oral thermometers start at about $6.00 You can compare prices online for the best deal. However, we are apparently old fashioned. The newest form of temperature assessment is the no contact digital scan thermometer. This one starts at about $50.

So, you have your temperature reading ready. What else will you need? I’ve always been asked for my blood pressure and pulse. I use an arm, rather than a wrist, device since my family doctor explained to me that the wrist device takes a reading through two bones. Those are the radius and ulna. The arm device takes your reading through only one bone, the humerus. She feels a reading through only one bone is more accurate. What device do I use? No matter which ones I’ve experimented with, I always return to Omron. It’s easy to use and accurate. These run from about $33 to over $100, depending upon how fancy you want to go. This description is from Amazon’s mid-price Omron:

Platinum (new version)

  • Trusted brand – Omron is the #1 recommended home blood pressure monitor brand by doctors and pharmacists for clinically-accurate home monitoring, and the #1 selling manufacturer of home blood pressure monitors for over 40 years.
  • Unlimited memory and users with the free app – The Omron gold wrist monitor stores 200 total blood pressure readings for 2 users (100 per user, most of any Omron wrist blood pressure monitor). Memory and users are unlimited with the Omron connect free app which works with amazon alexa-enabled devices (on select IOS & android devices).
  • High morning average indicator – Among Omron Amazon-exclusive blood pressure monitors, this feature is unique to the Gold and Platinum monitors. The indicator alerts the user if systolic or diastolic measurements are out of normal range in the morning, when there is a higher risk for heart attack or stroke.
  • Dual display with backlight – The Omron Platinum monitor features a backlit dual-display LCD monitor with easy navigation that allows the user to immediately compare the current reading to the previous reading. The backlight feature is only available with the Platinum Monitor.
  • AC adapter included – The Omron Ac Adapter eliminates the worry of changing batteries in your Omron Blood Pressure Monitor. The convenient AC adapter helps make sure your monitor is ready whenever you are.”

What else now? Let me think for a minute. Of course, if you are prediabetic or diabetic, you’ll be asked for your latest blood sugar readings. Believe it or not, I prefer WalMart’s no nonsense, no frills ReliOn Prime blood glucose monitor. In case you didn’t know, WalMart also operates as Sam’s Club. For my non-U.S.A. readers, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walmart, Walmart International operates in these countries:

Let’s keep in mind that anyone can edit in Wikipedia, so be certain to check before you bank upon going.

My family doctor did prescribe another brand which is a bit fancier in that it has a nicer looking case, lancet ejector, and meter. It was also more expensive and a prescription was needed.

If this is all new to you, you need to know you not only need this kit (which contains the monitor, a lancing device for your lancets, and spaces to store both your test strips and needles), but also the afore mentioned test strips and lancing device. You can buy 100 ultra-thin lancets for under $3.00. I suggest ultra-thin because I’ve found the thinner the lancet, the less the poke to get that one drop of blood needed for testing hurts.

The test strips are another story. These are expensive. They usually cost a little less than $18.00 for 100. And the lancing device? That’s about $6.00. The monitor itself is $9.00. The case comes with your starter kit. I haven’t found one sold separately by Walmart, although Amazon has a few for other brands. The number of times you need to test your blood glucose daily determines the weekly cost of your supplies.

You’ll also be asked for your height and weight. I have to admit I’m partial to digital devices and so have a digital scale from Amazon. Their scales run from $18.00 to $35.00. Of course, non-digital will be less expensive.

As for the height, I guess I cheated. I looked up the most recent height recorded on my last doctor’s appointment and used that.

Conclusion: You’ll need your temperature, blood pressure, height, weight, – if you’re prediabetic or diabetic – your blood glucose, and a phone, iPad sort of device, or computer for your telemedicine appointment.  Now you’re ready.

May you only have good results.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Not For Us

What an incredible weekend. I’m involved with Landmark Worldwide and spent a truly edifying three days at a Wisdom Unlimited Weekend (Comment if you’d like to know more about this.) and then had the pleasure of seeing my wickedly funny ventriloquist cousin – Steve Bernard – Jackperform at The Comedy Spot here in Arizona.  You may have noticed the blog is a bit late today.  Gee, I wonder why….

Before I forget, Janet Cook of JuicePlus received a response from the company’s medical advisor addressing my concerns about the amount of phosphorous and potassium in their products.

“Two Vineyard Blend capsules provide less than 30 milligrams of potassium and less than 20 milligrams of sodium, less than 10 mg of phosphorus….The potassium content of the daily recommended amount of Juice Plus+®, two Juice Plus+ Orchard Blend® capsules and two Juice Plus+  Garden Blend® capsules, will provide approximately 45 milligrams of potassium. Two Juice Plus+ Vineyard Blend® capsules provide approximately 30 milligrams of potassium. The phosphorus content of a daily adult serving of Juice Plus+  Orchard Blend® and Juice Plus+ Garden Blend® is less than 10 milligrams.”

That certainly takes care of my going over the limit of sodium, phosphorous, and potassium concerns which place the decision as to whether or not to indulge in this product smack dab back in your hands.  Thanks to Janet for quickly and efficiently getting this information to me.  I do appreciate the transparency of this company.

sad faceConfession time.  When I was a younger woman dealing with a newly diagnosed ill daughter, a difficult order of protection for my children, and an unexpected dumping by a boyfriend who had been a friend since high school, I threw up my hands and decided I needed help to control my weight – the one thing I thought I might be able to control.

A trusted friend introduced me to her new business and its products.  It was Shaklee, which is still in business over two decades later.  I can’t be certain this is the same product, but I think this was what I was taking, especially since I was a chocoholic at the time. (Ah, those were the days, my friends.) I also had never heard of soy at the time.

Shaklee Life Energizing Shake  canister

New delicious meal shake contains nutrients clinically proven to help create the foundation for a longer, healthier life. It is designed to increase your energy, help you achieve a healthier weight, and provide incredible digestive and immune support from fiber and probiotics.

Available in soy and non-soy formulas

The Shaklee Life Energizing Shake Mix comes packed with:

  • 24 grams* of protein, including 16 grams of plant-based, non-GMO protein
  • Added leucine to help preserve lean muscle and achieve a healthier weight
  • A powerful combination of prebiotics and one billion CFU of patented probiotics
  • Omega-3 (ALA) to support heart and brain health

And Life Shake:

  • Gluten free, lactose free, low glycemic, and Kosher
  • Contains no added artificial flavors, sweeteners or preservatives

* When prepared as directed with 1 cup of nonfat milk.

You can take a look at this yourself on their website at https://www.shaklee.com/us/en/shop/healthyweight/shaklee180meals/product-_p_shaklee-life-energizing-shakep. My buddy is no longer selling the product and has regained all the weight she lost and more.  Me, too.  That’s why I wonder if these ‘miracles,’ are such miracles since they don’t work if you don’t keep taking them.

Okay, enough philosophy, let’s take a look at this product through the eyes of a Chronic Kidney Disease patient.  When I clicked on Features for this product, I found more information.

  • 24 grams* of protein, including 16 grams of proprietary, plant-based, non-GMO protein with precise ratios of 9 essential amino acids, optimized for high protein quality
  • Non-soy formula contains an exclusive blend of sacha inchi, rice, pea and potato protein

As a CKD patient, I don’t think I’d like that. My renal diet allows 5 ounces of protein daily rather than the 24 grams each shake contains. I couldn’t find the information on the website, but vaguely remember having two shakes a day and a balanced meal. Two shakes? That’s 48 grams of protein. To put it in perspective, that’s less than 2 ounces a day, but I’ll pass. I can think of other ways I’d like to have my protein.

Just for fun, let’s look at the other two Ps and S, too.  The sodium is not bad at 250 mg. a day for two shakes. The potassium is 620 mg. for two shakes a day, also not despicable. As usual on nutritional labels these days, the phosphorous is not listed. However, we do know that milk, even non-fat milk, is a high phosphorous food.Label

Wait a minute, I just noticed something else. Are you prone to kidney stones? If so, you need to avoid high oxalate foods. Thought would have meant no chocolate shake for me.

I was curious about sacha inchi protein powder since it was new to me. About.com at http://altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/Sacha-Inchi.htm provided the following information.

Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis) is a plant native to Peru. The term “sacha inchi” typically refers to edible seeds produced by the sacha inchi plant. sacha inchiAlso known as sacha peanut, mountain peanut, or Inca peanut, these seeds have a nut-like flavor when roasted. Often marketed as a “superfood,” sacha inchi is said to offer a variety of health benefits.

So it looks like young(er) and foolish is the way I was. There’s no double about this one: with our protein restrictions, it’s not for CKD patients.

Topic change: In keeping with my strict policy of using all the profits from my kidney books to further spread awareness of CKD and ways to slow down the progressive decline of kidney function once you have CKD, I did the smart thing. I turned to a professional indexer to index The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2.Book CoverIMG_1398

Whether they’re for you, a newly diagnosed patient, friends, family, or anyone else, these books make excellent Christmas and Chanukah presents for those in the renal community and others who want to know about CKD. By the way, you can now order them in Sweden on Bokus.com.

I hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving. I’m sorely tempted to empty the jar of our daily gratitudes on that day, but I’ll be good and wait until New Year’s.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!